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Publication numberUS2237190 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1941
Filing dateJun 6, 1939
Priority dateJun 6, 1939
Publication numberUS 2237190 A, US 2237190A, US-A-2237190, US2237190 A, US2237190A
InventorsAngus Mcleod
Original AssigneeAngus Mcleod
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inner sole
US 2237190 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. MCLEOD INNER some April 1, 1941.1-

Filed June 6, .1959

INVENTOR ATTO R N EYS Patented Apr. 1, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT ()FFICE 2,237,190 Y 7 INNER, soLE Angus McLeod, Hanapepe, Territory of Hawaii Application June 6, 1939, Serial No. 277,721

' 5 Claims. (o1. 36-29) My invention relates broadly to footwear, and more particularly to soles as used in connection therewith.

-An important object of my invention is the provision of a sole for a shoe that is'durable and comfortable in use.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a pneumatic sole for a shoe that will ease the walking movement of the wearer.

Yet another object of my invention is the provision of a pneumatic sole for a shoe that will render the standing posture of the wearer less fatiguing.

Still another object of my invention is the provision of a pneumatic sole for a shoe that can be cheaply constructed and that is capable of continuous wear for a considerable period of time.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the drawing, forming a part of this specification, and in which like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same,

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a device embodying my invention, and showing parts broken away,

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view, taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of my device and showing parts broken away, and

Figure 4 is a transverse sectional view, taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 1.

In the accompanying drawing, wherein for the purpose of illustration, is shown a preferred embodiment of my invention, the numeral l0 desighates an upper supporting member, preferably made from a light springy metal, and having transverse corrugations extending from end to end thereof. is similarly provided with transverse corrugations [3, and it is preferably similarly made from recess IS in the rearward end of the lower supporting member l2. The extremity of the filling neck I5 is folded under the supporting member l2 after the body l4 thereof has been inflated.

A suitable binding tape 20 extends circumferentially around the corrugated sole members [0 A lower supporting member if! and l2 and functionsto hold thesame in intermeshing relation withone another and with the inflatable member l4 positioned therebetween. The loweredge of the tape 20 will engagewith the extremity l5 of the inflating member to aid in preventing the air therein from, escaping.

A yieldable cover- I! of cork, or the like, is superimposedon the bottom face of the sole member l2,and the rearward end I8 thereof overlies the neck l5 of the inflatable sack M to form a pocket or recess in which the said neck is normally received. The manner in which the neck is wrapped around the bottom sole will prevent the air within the body of the inflatable member from passing therethrough during the normal walking action. A similar yieldable covering IQ of cork, or the like, is superimposed in appressed relation to the upper surface of the upper wall support I0.

It may be easily seen that when the inflatable sack I4 is substantially filled with air, the upper and lower corrugated sole members l0 and I2 will be maintained in spaced relation with each other, and that a cushioning effect will be evidenced to the person supported thereon. The corrugations of the upper and lower sole members are positioned to intermesh when sufilcient weight is applied thereto, and due to the formation of the corrugations transversely of the members l0 and I2 a great flexibility longitudinally of the foot will be permitted and rigidly effected transversely thereof. The yieldable resilient cover I9 is superimposed on the upper surface of the member ID to prevent the sole of the foot from engaging directly with the corrugations, to the great discomflture of the person supported thereon. The cork material will also impart a substantial springiness to the sole and greatly increase the comfort of the wearer. The interposing of the air cushion between the supporting members It] and I2 will insulate the foot of the wearer from heat, cold and moisture. The sole may be used as the entire and complete sole of a shoe, or it may be made to function as an inner sole adapted to be inserted within the shoe and in appressed relation with the inner face of the outer sole.

It is to be understood that the form of the invention, herewith shown and described, is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that various changes in the size, shape and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of my invention, or the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A sole for shoes comprising longitudinally flexible, transversely rigid, upper and lower metallic supporting members, an inflatable member interposed between the said supporting members and superposed essentially resilient layers on the outer surfaces of the supporting members to hold the foot of a wearer from directly contacting the said metallic members.

2. A sole for shoes comprising longitudinally flexible, transversely rigid, upper and lower supporting members, an inflatable member interposed between the said supporting members, and

having a longitudinally extending filling neck, and coverings superimposed on the outer faces of the said supporting members and with the neck of the inflatable member wrapped around one of the supporting members and interposed between the outer surface thereof and the inner surface of the said covering to effectively seal the said inflatable member.

3. A sole for shoes comprising upper and lower metallic supporting members having transversely extending corrugations, said corrugations in the upper and lower members adapted to intermesh, an inflatable member interposed between said supporting members to normally hold the same spaced apart, and superposed yieldable layers on the outer surfaces of the said supporting members. 1

4. A sole for shoes comprising an upper supporting member having transversely extending corrugations, a lower supporting member having a rearward recess and transversely extending corrugations adapted to intermesh with the corrugations of the said first-mentioned supporting member, and an inflatable member interposed between the said supporting members and having a rearwardly extending filling neck received in the said rearward recess of the said lower supporting member and with the extremity thereof extending under the said member.

5. A sole for shoes comprising an upper supporting member having transversely extending corrugations, a lower supporting member having a rearward recess and transversely extending corrugations adapted to intermesh with the corrugations of the said first-mentioned supporting member, an inflatable member interposed between the said supporting members and having a rearwardly extending filling neck received in the said rearward recess of the said lower supporting. member and with the extremity thereof folded under the said member, and yieldable coverings superimposed onthe outer faces of the said supporting members. ANGUS McLEOD'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2682712 *Dec 30, 1950Jul 6, 1954Owsen Paul JShoe with inflated sole and heel
US2981010 *May 13, 1960Apr 25, 1961Helmer AaskovAir-filled sandals
US2983056 *May 12, 1959May 9, 1961Murawski Steven APneumatic foot wear
US4805319 *Feb 19, 1987Feb 21, 1989Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Cushioning and impact absorptive means for footwear operative component
US4813161 *Jan 23, 1985Mar 21, 1989Milliken Research CorporationFootwear
US5046267 *Nov 8, 1989Sep 10, 1991Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with pronation control device
US5247742 *Dec 11, 1990Sep 28, 1993Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with pronation rearfoot motion control device
US5297349 *Feb 22, 1991Mar 29, 1994Nike CorporationAthletic shoe with rearfoot motion control device
US5930919 *Sep 14, 1998Aug 3, 1999Mathias; Timothy ScottShoe sole
US6625905 *Aug 31, 2001Sep 30, 2003Mizuno CorporationMidsole structure of athletic shoe
US6675501Jul 26, 1999Jan 13, 2004Phoenix Footwear Group, Inc.Insole construction for footwear
US6922914Nov 24, 2003Aug 2, 2005Phoenix Footwear Group, Inc.Insole construction for footwear
US7171764Apr 1, 2005Feb 6, 2007Phoenix Footwear Group, Inc.Insole construction for footwear
US7434338Dec 20, 2006Oct 14, 2008Phoenix Footwear Group, Inc.Insole construction for footwear
EP0452576A1 *Apr 18, 1990Oct 23, 1991Chi-Ming ChenShoe insole laminate
WO1998023180A1 *Nov 19, 1997Jun 4, 1998Perron MauriceTherapeutic and insulating insole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/29
International ClassificationA43B17/03, A43B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B17/03
European ClassificationA43B17/03