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Publication numberUS2239206 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 22, 1941
Filing dateJul 12, 1939
Priority dateJul 12, 1939
Publication numberUS 2239206 A, US 2239206A, US-A-2239206, US2239206 A, US2239206A
InventorsTietig Chester
Original AssigneeTietig Chester
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plastic shoe
US 2239206 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. TlETlG PLASTIC SHOE April 22, 1941.

Filed July 12, 1939 Patented Apr. 22, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PLASTIC SHOE Chester Tietig, Covington, Ky.

Application July 12, 1939, Serial No. 284,063

6 Claims.

This invention relates to a shoe made from plastic material.

Among the objects of the invention is to provide a shoe which will grip the wearers foot with a degree of pressure which is sufilcient to hold the shoe on tightly but insuillcient to cause discomfort. Another object is to provide a shoe which is easy and quick to manufacture and which costs less than a leather shoe. A third object is to provide a molded metallic arch support interior of the sole. A fourth object is to provide a shoe of striking appearance which is readily colored by dyes incorporated into the plastic mass and which is transparent and therefore adapted to show the wearer's foot.

In the drawing, Figure 1 shows the preferred form of the invention.

Figure 2 shows a low-heeled form in which the bands or straps across the foot are fused orv otherwise sealed together.

Figure 3 is a lengthwise section of the shoe which is shown in Figure 2, said section showing an incorporated arch support.

Figure 4 is a shoe according to my invention, said shoe being in flat form, 1. e., not folded to conform to the wearer's foot. Figure 4 represents a stage or intermediate product in the manufacture of my shoe. v

The plastic material which I prefer to use for making my shoes is the vinyl polymer of one of the vinyl halides probably vinyl chlorides, said polymer being known as Koroseal and manufactured by the B. F. Goodrich Company. The grade of Koroseal which I prefer to use is known as 117, it being so designated by the mani ufacturers. My invention is, however, not limited to this material. Harder grades of Koroseal may be used and entirely different plastics can also be employed. Another such plastic is methyl methacrylate (Lucite, Luxene). Another is cel lulose acetate ('I'enite). Another is polyvinyl acetal. Still other suitable materials are monomeric methyl acrylates, such as butyl, amyl, lauryl, stearyl, interpolymerized with methacrylate ester, vinyl compounds, butadiene or styrene. Still other equivalents are the polystyrols manufactured and sold commercially by the Dow Chemical Company of Midland, Michigan. To each or all of such materials, plasticizers may be added to promote flexibility. Such compounds and mixtures are very well known to the art and it lies within the skill of any competent plastics chemist to add such stabilizers in suitable amounts to get required degrees of flexibility.

The shoe shown is made of a sole III which is made of one of the resins named. The sole preferably encloses a metal shank or arch support II which ispreferably molded within the sole as shown in Figure 3, however, it may be omitted. A heel I! may be made of a different material than the sole and may be cemented thereto or it may be of the same material of and integral with the sole. A counter l3 may also be integral with the sole. Above the sole l0 and adherent thereto there is preferably a cloth covering ll extending completely over the sole and heel. This cloth is made preferably of cotton which will stand the molding temperatures although other suitable textiles may be used.

As shown in Figures 4, 3 and 1, the metallic arch support ll may have extensions or fins l5 which curve about over the foot. Such fins are embedded in bands or straps I6 which are made grip the foot, thus causing the shoe to give quite substantial support. The fins may be omitted if desired.

Referring to Figure 1, this shoe is open along the top of the vamp, this open space being designated II. It is intended that this open space coincide with the bony ridge down the top of the human foot, this ridge being further toward the inside of the foot than toward the outside. Such a shoe requires no lace. However, eyelets or holes and the usual laces may be provided if desired. The counter I3 is also molded around the last from the flattened counter integral with the sole shown in Figure 4.

The sole I0 as well as the bands I6 may have incorporated into the composition from which they are made from 1% to 25% by weight of textile fiber or asbestos fiber. I prefer to use cotton fiber of an average length of about A. Wool fiber (shoddy) may also be used. The textile or asbestos fiber has the advantage of hindering the transmission of heat through the sole of the shoe.

The cloth inner sole I may also extend to the inner side of bands It as shown at IS on Figure 4.

While no invention is claimed for the use of rubber in making shoes, nevertheless, it is within the purview of my invention to make a rubber shoe, 1. e.. the rubber being used in place of the named plastics, when my specific construction of shoe is used, provided such construction lies within the scope of the following claims.

As shown in Figure 3 there may be a number of cloth layers 2. interspersed with layers of flexible plastic making up both the bands II and the sole, the two being integral.

In this specification and the appended claims the term molded is to be interpreted broadly enough to include the hot or cold pressing of a powder or a syrup in a mold to harden or consolidate same, but also to include the pressing together to adhesion of already formed sheets of plastic material, said adhesion being either to textiles or to another plastic sheet of the same character.

Referring now to Figure 2, at 2| it is shown that the bands I may be attached to each other at their ends by fusing or cementing so that a longitudinally closed shoe is produced. Although a lap Junction is shown, a butt junction is regarded as being equivalent.

An equivalent for the cloth covering I4 is paper or a felt covering.

My shoe may be fitted to the human foot by heating the shoe to the softening point of the plastic and pressing the shoe manually or otherwise about the foot of the person who is to be the wearer and allowing the shoe to cool while so pressed.

I claim as my invention:

1. A sandal comprising a sole of a tough thermoplastic material of limited flexibility at ordinary temperature and bands of the same material curving upwardly and inwardly from said sole and being integral therewith, for enclosing the forward portion of the human foot by the inherent resiliency of the material in the bands.

2. A sandal comprising a sole of tough synthetic resin thermoplastic material of limited flexibility at ordinary temperature and a plurality of bands comprising the same material curving upwardly and inwardly from said sole and being integral therewith for enclosing the forward portion of the human foot by the ininherent resiliency of the material in the bands and an inner sole of textile material extending over at least as much of .the inner surface of said sandal as the sole and being adherent thereto.

4. A sandal comprising a sole of a tough thermoplastic material of limited flexibility at ordinary temperature and bands of the same ma terial curving upwardly and inwardly from said sole and integral therewith for enclosing at least the forward portion of the human foot by the inherent resiliency of the material in the bands, said synthetic resin material comprising a polyvinyl halide.

5. A sandal oomprising a sole and bands of the same material as the sole and integral therewith, said bands curving upwardly and inwardly from said sole for enclosing the forward portion of the human foot by the inherent resiliency of the material in the bands, said sole and bands being built up of a plurality of textile sheets interspersed with at least one layer of a tough thermoplastic material of limited flexibility at ordinary temperature.

6. A sandal comprising a sole of tough thermosplastic material of limited flexibility at ordinary temperature and bands of the same material integral with the sole curving upwardly and inwardly from said sole and enclosing the forward portion of the human foot by the inherent resiliency of the material in the bands, a heel integral with said sole, a counter also integral therewith and being also adapted to assist the retention of the sandal on the wearer's foot by the resiliency of its material.

CHESTER TH'JTIG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2496782 *Mar 25, 1948Feb 7, 1950Engel Arthur CPrepared molded shoe vamp
US2509335 *Sep 20, 1946May 30, 1950Harry A DadismanShoe with channel members embedded in sole
US2568974 *May 20, 1947Sep 25, 1951John P TarboxVamp and sole connection
US2586747 *May 10, 1949Feb 19, 1952Atta VanDetachable body grounding device
US2606333 *Jan 8, 1949Aug 12, 1952Alan E MurrayMethod of making shoes
US2677201 *Jul 6, 1950May 4, 1954Albert Lyon GeorgeShoe of thin gauge sheet metal
US2736972 *Apr 22, 1953Mar 6, 1956Morris BinghamAttaching means for overshoes
US2747301 *Aug 4, 1953May 29, 1956Diamond Match CoMolded pulp slipper
US4592152 *May 20, 1985Jun 3, 1986Brown Group, Inc.Unlasted shoe
US4766680 *Dec 23, 1986Aug 30, 1988Grendene S.A.Shoe with transparent sole and scuff pads
US5659979 *Oct 17, 1994Aug 26, 1997Sileo; SteveTransparent footwear with interchangeable tongue and insole and kit therefore
US6128834 *May 20, 1999Oct 10, 2000A.K.A Advanced Kit Art S.R.LShoe using a moulded bottom provided with a series of slots for the application of a strap-type closed upper
US6874255Apr 3, 2003Apr 5, 2005Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear
US6990753 *Sep 8, 2004Jan 31, 2006Keen LlcThree point footwear
US7290356Jun 8, 2005Nov 6, 2007Keen, Inc.Footwear with multi-piece midsole
US7328527Aug 27, 2004Feb 12, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe strap changing system
US7513064 *Jul 22, 2004Apr 7, 2009Keen, Inc.Footwear having an enclosed and articulated toe
US7762011Jan 29, 2007Jul 27, 2010Keen, Inc.Toe protection sandal
US7762012Sep 27, 2007Jul 27, 2010Keen, Inc.Footwear with multi-piece midsole
US7997009Apr 1, 2009Aug 16, 2011Keen, Inc.Footwear having an enclosed and articulated toe
US8533976Aug 15, 2011Sep 17, 2013Keen, Inc.Footwear having an enclosed toe
US8834770 *Dec 11, 2012Sep 16, 2014Wolverine World Wide,Inc.Sole component for an article of footwear and method for making same
US20040049945 *Apr 3, 2003Mar 18, 2004Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear
US20050060914 *Jul 22, 2004Mar 24, 2005Fuerst Rory W.Footwear having an enclosed and articulated toe
US20050115109 *Aug 27, 2004Jun 2, 2005Jared GoldmanShoe strap changing system
US20050183289 *Apr 21, 2005Aug 25, 2005Roger NeileyFootwear fit system
US20050268492 *Jun 8, 2005Dec 8, 2005Fuerst Rory WFootwear with multi-piece midsole
US20050274040 *Sep 8, 2004Dec 15, 2005Fuerst Rory WThree point footwear
US20060037217 *Jul 25, 2005Feb 23, 2006Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear and methods of making
US20080010855 *Sep 27, 2007Jan 17, 2008Keen, Inc.Footwear with multi-piece midsole
US20090126229 *Jan 29, 2007May 21, 2009Keen LlcToe protection sandal
US20090265955 *Apr 1, 2009Oct 29, 2009Fuerst Rory WFootwear having an enclosed and articulated toe
US20130091638 *Dec 11, 2012Apr 18, 2013Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Sole component for an article of footwear and method for making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 36/25.00R, 36/DIG.200, 36/58.5, 36/154
International ClassificationA43B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/124, Y10S36/02
European ClassificationA43B3/12D