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Publication numberUS2239821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1941
Filing dateAug 1, 1939
Priority dateAug 1, 1939
Publication numberUS 2239821 A, US 2239821A, US-A-2239821, US2239821 A, US2239821A
InventorsKnox Stuart C
Original AssigneeMedical Engineering Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fracture frame
US 2239821 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Apri129, 1941. s. c. KNOX 2,239,821

FRACTURE FRAME Filed Aug. 1, 1939 4, sheets-sheet 1 /mven Zar. jlaarl C'. Knox.

April 29, 1941. s. c. KNox l FRACTURE FRAME Filed Aug. 1, 1939 4 sheets-sheet 2 um wh nvenior. aan? C Knox.

April' 29, 1941.

s. c. KNox FRACTURE FRAME Filed Aug. 1, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 "77 70,0 /ao y/d Apri129, 1941. s, QKNQX 2,239,821

FRACTURE FRAME Filed Aug. 1, 1939 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 y; IQ

L'la //4 i I @f lay-I Inl/enfer. ,52a arl' Cno Je.

Patented Apr. 29, 1941 Medical Engineering Company,

Los Angeles,

Calif., a copartnership composed of` Stuart C. Knox, T. Keith Glennan and' Daniel Cornwall Hickson Appunti@ August 1, 1939, sel-inno.' 287,779

` 6 Claims.

This invention relates generally to fracture frames, and more particularly to apparatus for supporting patients suffering from fractures of various varieties requiring immobilization in bed, either in casts or in traction apparatus, for long periods of time.

It is a matter of common medical knowledge that nursing care for `fracture patients requiring immobilization in bed is extremely diicult, and also that previously employed fracture frames, which are designed to be fastened to the bed, allow alteration of the force and direction of any applied traction apparatus when the patient is moved in the bed. If the patient is conined in a cast, the problem is principally concerned with the matter of turning or moving the patient and cast, a task usually maneuvered clumsily and with diniculty for both patient and nurses.

The general object of the present invention is to provide a fracture frame within which many types of fracture patients may be immobilized, and which enables the patient to be turned from side to side or completely over without interfering with the immobilization of the injured parts or with applied traction apparatus.

In accordance with the present invention, there is providedv a light, cylindrical frame, within which may be placed a patient confined in a plaster cast and/or requiring the application of traction and counter-traction apparatus. frame is supported for rotation about its longitudinal axis within. a stationary cradle, in such a manner as to permit easy rotation of the frame about said axis, and so that the patient together withall of his encumbering apparatus may be turned over, partially or completely, as may be desireds without producing any distortion of his body and especially of the alinement of any injured portion thereof. The invention provides a system of cross-bars and braces attachable to the rotatable frame in a variety of ways to accommodate the requirement of diiferent cases, these cross bars providing support for the mattress and for construction of various types of apparatus which may be required.

It is a matter of common medical knowledge that a fracture patient should not be moved any more than' is absolutely essential prior to splinting of the injured parts. In the ordinary case', under present practice, the patient .is nevertheless liited about considerably during transportation to the hospital, lifting to and from litters, X-raying, and finally placing in the hospital bed.

A further purpose of the present invention is to provide a fracture frame capable of quick as- This sembly out. of a' group of standard members, and a part of whichmay first be assembled to form a stretcher on which the patient can be transported to and about' the hospital, and which may then be completed to form the kfull fracture frame. Thus a part of the apparatus, in the form of a stretcher, may in appropriate cases be transported to the injured patient, and when the patient has been once positioned thereon, he may remain there,not evenbeing removed for X-raying. When the patient is ready to be placed in bed, the stretcher is simply converted into the complete fracture framey by building thereon certain additional structure.

Various additional objects and features of the invention` will appear and be described in the course of `the following detailed description of 'a present illustrative embodiment of the invention, reference for this purpose being had tov the accompanyingr drawings, vin which:

Fig. l is a side elevation of the fracture frame in accordance with the invention;

Fig.2 is an end elevation of the fracturev element lbeing a view taken in the direction of arrows 2-.2 of Fig. 1V; y

Fig. 3 is a detail section taken on line 3-'3 of Fig. 2;

l Fig. lis a detail section taken on line ll-l of Fig. 2;r

. Fig. 4a Fig.n2; l

Fig. 4b is a view looking at the clamp device of Fig. 4 fromthe right; Y Y *y Y 5 is a View similar to Fig. 1,I but showing a typical application to one type of'pauent;

Fig. 5d is a detail takenl on line 5a- 5a of Fig.

is an enlarged detail of a portion of Fig 6 is' a section taken on linel (ir-6 of Fig. 5`; Fig. 7 is ay section similar to Fig. 6, but showing the apparatus' rotated through 180 to invert the patient;

Fig. 8 is a'detail of one ofthe cro'ss'bars;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged detail of a cross bar clamp;`

Fig. l0 is a section on line lil-l0 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 1l is a section one line I l-l I'of Fig. 9;

Fig. 12 is a detail sectionv taken as indicated by line I2 al2 of Fig. k1, certain parts being broken away and the small platform between the two mattress platforms being omitted;

Fig. 1'3 is a section taken on line lf3-i3 of Fig. 12';-

Fig.' 13a is a detail section taken on line |311- I'3a ot Fig.- 13; -f

Fig. 14 is a view of the undersidemoi, themattressj supporting frame, showingda clamp-rec I A" les the clamp device cooperable therewith being omitted;

Fig. 15 is a detail section on line |5-I5 of Fig.

Fig. 16 is a d'etail section on line |6|6 of Fig. and

Fig. 17 is a detail perspective showing an arm rest.

In the drawings, numerals 20 and 2| designate la pair ,of light ihoops or rings of tubular cross section, which are connected by four equally spaced longitudinal tubular members or rails 22, the K occasionally be required with diiereni-I types of patients, the connections between the longitudinal rails 22 and the rings 20 and 2| arefof such a nature as will permit the rails 22 to be readily moved in a. longitudinal direction relatively to the rings, and to be clamped in any adjusted position.

Fig. shows one typical and present preferred quickly releasable connection means between the longitudinal rails 22 and rings 20 land 2|. As shown in said gure, which is a section on line |5|5 of Fig. 6, the rail 22 is sldably received within a sleeve 26 which is Welded to the end ring, in this case ring 20. This sleeve 26 has near one end a screw-threaded section 21 and a tapered portion 28 beyond said screw-threaded section, the tapered and threaded portions of the sleeve being longitudinally split ias indicated at 29. This split portion of sleeve 26 is adapted to be compressed to apply a clamping force to rail 22 by means of a clamp ring 30 having internal screwthreads 3| engaging .the threaded section 21 of sleeve 26 and having a tapered portion 32 engaging the tapered yend portion 28 of the sleeve. When this ring 30, which is externally knurled or ribbed for convenience in gripping, is tightcned on sleeve 26, the interengagement of the described tapered surfaces causes the split portion lof sleeve 26 to become compressed and clampedv tightly to tubular rail 22.

Rings and 2| are each supported at the bottom by a pair of horizontally spaced rollers 35,

each of which is mounted on a shaft 36 carried by a vertical supporting plate 31 and a bracket 36 mounted on plate 31. The tw-o plates 31 carrying :the roll-ers 35 for each end ring of the apparatus are secured to and supported by the vertical ange a of an angle member 40 having a floor flange 4| (see Fig. :3). The angle members 40 at thetwo ends of the apparatus are connected by longitudinal tubular members 43, which are slidably received in sleeves 44 welded to supporting plates 31 (Fig. 3), plat-es 31 and angle members 48 being suitably boredto pass the projecting ends of the members 43. Sleeves 44 are split, as indicated at 46, and are adapted to be clamped tightly to members 43 by screws 41 and wing nuts 48, screws 41 passing through lugs 49 formed on said sleeves. 'I-hus by virtue of this adjustment means, the supporting members 40, which Iare adapted to rest on the longitudinal rails of a standard hospital bed, may be moved toward or from one another to accommodate the desired spacing distance between end rings 20 and 2|.

The frame R consisting of the endhoops 20 and 2| and the four connecting members'22 is thus rotatable by a rolling action yof hoops 2|) and 2| .on the rollers 35 of the stationary cradle C made up of the described end members 40 and connecting members 43. As a means for locking frame R against rotation in this cradle C, I here show `a typical clamp device 50 (see Figs. 2 and 4), one of which is preferably mounted on each of the yangle members 40, these clamp devices being adapted to apply a positive braking action `on the end hoops of the rotating frame. The preferred clamp here shown for illustrative purposes (Figs. 2 and 4) comprises a somewhat springy clamp arm 56a mounted on and projecting `upwardly from one of the angle members 40, the upper end portion of which is provided with a pad 5i, of felt or the like, adapted to bear against the side of ring 28. An opposed clamp arm 52, the upper end ,portion of which has a pad 53, similar to pad 5|, is arranged to bear against the opposite side of ring 29. This clamp arm 52 is mounted at its lower end for movement toward and from ring 26; as here illustratively shown, the lower end .of arm 52 has an aperture 54 through which projects a tongue 55 on the end of a supporting arm 56 mounted on the vertical flange 40a of angle member 40. A clamping shaft 58 passes through arms 50av and 52 below ring` 20, and disposed about this shaft between arms 59a and 52 is a coil compression spring 59, while disposed about said shaft between arm 52 and a washer 60 supported near the end of the shaft is a coil spring 6|. A clamping lever 62 comprising a handle 63 land a pair of arms or cam lugs 64- is pivotally mounted on the other end of shaft 58, in the varrangement clearly illustrated in Figs. 2, 4a and 4, cam lugs 64 being arranged to bear -on the surface of arm 50a on opposite sides vof shaft-l 58. When clamp handle 634 is movedfrom the full line to', the dotted line "position of Fig. 4, shaft 58 is drawn in a lefthanded direction relatively to the two clamp arms, and the clamp arms are caused to engage ring 20 under the pressure of spring 6|, thus locking the ring against rotation on supporting rollers 35. When clamp handle 63 is moved to the full line position of Fig. 4, the shaft 58 moves a short distance toward the right under the act/ion of the springs, the spring 59 acting to spread the clamp arms apart, and the ring 29 thus being released for rotation.

A number of tubular cross bars are provided, such as indicated at 18 in Fig. 8, and at 10a, 13b, etc., in the other gures, each .cross bar having at opposite ends clamp devices 1| by which said cross bars may be tightly clamped to the longitudinally extending members 22 of the rotatable frame, or to other cross-bars 18. These cross bars are of such length that they will just t between ,the four, `equally spaced longitudinal members 22, or between any two lparallel cross bars 10 which have been clamped to the members 22, as will later be more fully described.

A present preferred clamp device 1| by which these bars 19 may be easily clamped to and re- 4leased from the members 22, and which, when in clamping position, so tightly grips the members 22 as to be incapable of displacement therealong, is shown in detail in Figs. 9 to 11. As

shown in said figures, there is received Within the end of the tubular cross bar a shank 12 having extending therefrom a substantially semicylindric clampv portion 13 adapted to t approximately half-way around one of the longitudinal members 22 of the rotatable frame..

Hinged to member 13, as at 14, is a swbstantially the end of the tubular cross bar has an in- 5 ternal cam surface 'Il overriding a lug 18 projecting from the hingedr closure member '15, and also has a notch 19 adapted to pass lug 18 when rotated into alinement therewith (see Fig. 9). The clamp device being in the po-sition of Fig. 9, rotation of sleeve 'I6 to the position of Fig. l1 causes cam surface to engage against surface 80 on the outer side of lug 18, the locking sleeve becoming wedged tightly against lug 13 so that it is restrained against displacement by the frictional engagement with `said lug. To release the clamp, locking sleeve 16 is simply rotated in the reverse direction until lug 18 is alined with aperture 19, whereupon closure 'l5 may be swung outwardly to the dotted line posi tion of Fig. 10. Sleeve 16 is confined against endwise movement on tubular cross bar 'I0 between an enlarged head 8|a on the end of a pin 8| extending through tubular member l2, and a shoulder 82 formed at the base of clamp member 13. A stop lug 83 formed on sleeve lf3 engages pin 8| when locking lug i8 is in alinement with aperture 19, this provision enabling the position Lat which the clamp device may be opened to be readily found.

Shank '|2 is preferably it somewhat loosely within the end of tubular cross-bar 10, its transverse bore a through which pin 8| extends being somewhat oversize, as indicated, and the shank being capable of comparatively free longi- 3- tudinal `as well as rotational movement within member 10, within the limits, of course, provided by oversize bore 10a and pin 8|, This provision enables the cross-bar to be more readily clamped between the longitudinal members, it being apparent that if no such play were provided, the slightest difference in distance from center to center of the members 22 and from center to center of the clamp devices at the two ends of the connecting cross bar would otherwise make 4" the cross bars difficult to assemble with the frame. This provision, of course, also enables the cross bars to be more readily mounted between two other cross bars already on the frame, and also enables ready movement of the cross bars along any two parallel members simply by rele' sing` the lclamping pressure somewhat. T'he des ibedjplay .between the clamp members and crossl a`1' s'also [aids in forming a tight grip betwefenj thercrossibar and5 the members to which .imposed on the wkedvgrvsligh Y ing, the eiectfof causing the lar'np to bit tightly interne vertical-ment able actionn wouldfotfffco clampsfwere rigidlyin nte l cross bar., vReference `is here 'madVw Walter H. Righter, entitled, med vangustiv 23,1929; ser; i291; the above described cla devic claimed'perfs'e. l n f `The described A`cross. bars A[0, -1 ciampedvf'betweerrn longitudinally 5 tubular members 22Jan`d2i between eacn'o'tlerh-Eor I porti-ngplatform, |20

a variety of purposes, among whichisthe support of the mattresses on which the patient is rested. Thus, a pair of cross bars 10a and 10b are shown as clamped between the two lower longitudinal rods 22 (see Figs. 1, 2 and 6), the member 10a being positioned close to' end ring 20 and the member 10b being positioned approximately or nearly half-way of the distance from ring 20 to ring 2|. A mattress-supporting platform is mounted on this pair of cross rods 10a; and 10b, being releasably clamped thereto as presently to be described. Thi-s plate form 90 is rectangular in outline, and of approximately the length and breadth dimensions of the half-length mattress 9| which is employed. As shown in Figs. 12, 13 and 14, platform 90, which is preferably fabricated of sheet metal, typically comprises a top` wall 92, sides 93, ends 94 and 95, the latter having a projecting ange portion 95a, and inwardly turned bottom iianges 96, which are adapted to rest directly on cross bars 10a and 10b.

For the purpose of releasably clamping this platform 90 to cross bars 10a and 10b, a pair of quick-releasable clamp devices |00 are employed, a preferred form of which is shown in Figs. 12 and 13. Secured to the underside of the top wall 92 of platform 90 is a supporting member or bracket |0| embodying a longitudinally slotted wall |02 spaced below the top wall 92, the slot being indicated at |03. This slotted wall |02 is braced above and below and onv both sides of slot |03 with bracing strips |04 and |05. A T-member |08 has its cross part |09 received in the space between wall |02 and wall 92, with its shank ||0 projecting through the slot |03 in wall |02. Secured to the depending end of this shank ||0 is a somewhat springy clamp arm hav-k ing at one end an arcuate portion ||2 adapted to engage a cross bar, as bar 10b, and having pivotally connected to its opposite end, as at ||3`, a handle member ||4 having a pair of cam lugs H5 adapted to engage strips |05 on opposite sides of slot |03. With the parts in the position of Fig, 13, clamp arm is braced against the underside of cross bar 10b, and is under exure and acting through T-member |08 to hold platform 90 tightly down to cross bar 10b. The clamping construction at but one end of platform 90 is illustrated in Figs. 12 to 14, it being understood that this construction is duplicated at the other end, a second clamping device |00 being employed for holding the platform down to the other cross-bar 10a.

Thev mattress 9| may be of any suitable type, and is preferably provided with some convenient means for fastening it to its platform 90; for eX- ample, straps Il secured to the mattress may be fastened to the underside of platform 90 as by means of conventional snaps, indicated in Fig. 12 at H8,

,qnerdescribed half-length mattress supportingfplatform. 9 0 and ma-ttress 9| are for the upper portionyoi-the patient, a separate mattress sup-y ,Y l i ,y ia .nd mattress |`2|, of construct-ion;exactly-.isi ilarftorthat of platform 90 and mattressgltf-'but botte. dalength, being providedifor the lejgsgfiof atienQ-i'and being positioned inthe frame, platforr'nL :9.0;: and-:mattress 9 |V ,this-frisecond mattress .zsupportinD platform ,0 and@ its'mattressi: |21; aresupported: by VclQSs mein-7 .bersiiindi'catedati? '|10czaand .pldfawhicli faire ycon? nected between.;atlie.:lwer; longitudinalzmembers 22. The horizontal cross bars 10c and 10d will be understood to be connected or clamped between the lower longitudinal members 22 in eX- actly the same way as are members 10a. and 10b. Fig. 1 shows a modified arrangement, in which the platform |20 and its mattress |2| are mounted on cross bars 10c and 10d, which in this instance, instead of being secured betweenthe lower longitudinal members 22, are secured between parallel vertical cross bars 10e and 10j which, in turn, are secured between the longitudinal members 22 on the two sides of the frame R. It will be understood that in many cases it is desirable that the legs of the patient be elevated, and this is provided for in the arrangement of Fig. 1. It will also be understood that while the mattress |2| and platform |20 are shown in a horizontal position in Fig. 1, a tilted position is readily obtained simply by arranging the cross bars '|00 and '10d at different elevations on their vertical supporting bars 10e and 10j. It will also be understood that while I have illustrated the upper mattress supporting platform 90 as supported on cross-bars 10a and 10b, with the latter fitted between the two lower longitudinal rails 22, the bars 10a and '10b may, in case elevation of either end of the upper mattress should be desired, be supported by vertical cross bars in the same way as illustrated for the lower mattress in Fig. 1.

The purpose of the space allowed between the adjacent ends of the two mattress supporting platforms 90 and |20 is to enable convenient bedpan care of the patient. A readily removable closure platform |10 is provided for bridging across this space, being provided with projecting flanges |1I adapted to be supported by flanges 95a and |20a projecting from platforms 90 and |20, the two platforms being spaced apart a distance proper to accommodate this closure platform. In many cases, especially those not of a body-cast type, it is highly desirable that the patient be provided with continuous support and suitable padding or cushions (not shown), or an additional mattress of the type of 9| and |2|, supported by this intermediate platform |10 fulfills this need.

Figs. 5, 6 and '1 illustrate a typical use of the apparatus. The patient P is shown as encased within a body cast |30. The head, shoulders and upper back of the patient and the upper portion of the body cast are supported by upper mattress 9|, while the lower portion of the cast is illustrated as supported by a pair of horizontal cross bars 10g and 10h, which engage the cast above and below the knee, and are themselves supported by a pair of vertical bars 10i connected between the upper and lower longitudinal members 22 on each side of frame R (see Fig. 5a.). The foot of the cast is indicated as held down by another horizontal cross bar 10j connected between vertical cross bars 10k.

Fig. 5 also illustrates the case of a patient having a leg fracture, requiring the application of one type of traction apparatus. Thus, the left leg of the patient is shown in an elevated position, and covered from foot to just below the knee by an adhesive skin-traction device |38, the knee being raised and the leg passing over a horizontal cross bar at |t, which acts as a counter support for the traction apparatus, bar '|0t being supported between a pair of vertical cross bars 10m connected between members 22, as will be understood. The cross bar at 10i supports the leg again-st a spring tension or traction apparatus, indicated at |39, and which is con- Figs. 5, 6 and '7 show the arrangements made when it is desired to turn the patient over without interfering with the alinement of his body within the rotatable frame R. A pair of Vertical cross bars 10u are mounted between the upper and lower longitudinal members 22 on each side of frame R at a convenient location along the upper portion of the body of the patient. A pair of horizontal cross bars 10p are fitted between these vertical cross bars 10u, and clamped thereto in an inverted position, as by means of clamp devices |00, is a mattress supporting frame 90a to which is secured a mattress 9|a., frame 90a and mattress Sla being exactly similar to the previously described upper mattress supporting frame 90 an-d mattress 0|. The mattress supporting frame 90a passes beneath cross members 10p, with mattress 9|a below it and in contact with the upper portion of the body of the patient, the arrangement being such that when frame R is subsequently turned over, the weight of the upper portion of the patient will be transferred to mattress 9|a without substantial disturbance of the position of the patient with relation to frame R. Thus it will be understood that horizontal cross bars 10p are so positioned on vertical cross bars 10u that mattress 0|a is in rm, though not uncomfortable, contact with the patient.

To support the sides of the patient during inversion, the following provisions are made. A Vertical side board or panel |50 is placed alongside `the body of the patient on each side and is clamped to vertical cross bars 10u, a suitable and i preferred construction being illustrated in Fig.

16. Panel |50, which is preferably fabricated of sheet metal, has projecting therefrom spring clips adapted to be clamped to vertical cross bars u. According to the construction illustrated, each clip |5| comprises a pair of spring arms |52 having curved portions |53 adapted for engagement with opposite sides of a vertical cross bar. The panels |50 are mounted on the apparatus simply by engaging these clips |5I with the vertical cross bars 10u. Before turning the patient, the sides of the patient are suitably blocked with cushions placed against these panels |50, in the general arrangement indicated at |50 in Fig, 6.

To turn the patient over, the Clamp devices 50 at the two ends of the stationary cradle are released, thereby freeing the end rings and 2| of frame R for free rolling action on supportingV rollers' 35. Frame R may then be rolled either partly or completely over as may be desired, Fig. '7 illustrating the frame to have been completely inverted, so that the patient is then resting on the mattress vSila. Clamp devices are of course re-applied when frame R has been rotated to the desired position. v

While the patient is in the inverted position of Fig. '7, the mattress 90 may of course be removed, either for the purpose of resting the patient. or so that the back ofl the patient mayv be given any necessary attention. It will be evident that this inversion of the patient is accomplished frame is so designed that in the case of a severely injured fracture patient, a portion of theY frame may rst be assembledv as a litter on which the patient may be transported to and about the hospital prior to being taken to his hospital room.

Thus, for this purpose, the two lower longitudinal rails 22, the cross bars "ma, wb, c, and 1M,

and the mattress platforms all, |22 and |10, with their associated mattresses, may rst be assembled together and employed as a litter. Subsequently, without ever removing the patient, the

litter is converted' into the complete fracture.

frame by addition of end rings 211| and 2|, upper longitudinal rails 22, the necessary cross bars, employed in any necessary arrangement, and the frame R thus provided is then placed on the rollers 35 of the stationary sub-frame or cradle. The litter made up basically of the two lower longitudinal rails 22 and mattress supporting cross bars is also capable of variation for special types of patients. frame R, which is made up principally of light tubular members, and is therefore not unduly cumbersome, may be employed as a litter. Or, as a variation, certain temporary structure may be erected on the lower longitudinal rails 22. Thus, in case it should be desired to suspend an injured member from above during transportation on the litter, a suitable overhead support may be erected on lower rails 22 out of the cross bars,-

which may, at the top, be clamped to a single longitudinal rail, thus forming a temporary triangular structure, from the upper longitudinal member of which the injured member may be suspended.

The many types of cases to` which the frame of the present invention may be adapted involve the use of numerous varieties of traction and extension devices which may be clamped to the frame and its cross bars in various ways, as well as supporting of the patient in various ways within the frame R depending upon the pecularities of his injuries. The accompanying drawings, and especially Fig. 5, show how the standard length cross bars may be built into the frame in any desired fashion to accommodate any type of fracture patient. The cross bars may be clamped between any two of the longitudinal rails 22, or between parallel cross bars clamped between rails 22, or for special purposes, may be clamped at one end to one of the rails or cross bars and eX- tended therefrom outwardly of the frame, as may be required for the support of traction or extension apparatus, or of any other equipment. Fig. 17 shows a cross bar 10x thus clamped at one end to one of the upper rails 22 and extending outwardly and downwardly therefrom, its lower clamp gripping a second cross bar 18g, and the aforementioned panel |52, which was shown as employed for side support of the patient in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, is shown as clipped to bar lily and to lower longitudinal rail 22 to provide an arm rest for the patient. There are a number of different standard types of traction equipment and methods of support for different types of injuries, all of which may be duplicated with the standard In extreme cases, the entire `cross-bars of the present frame, which may be interbuilt into the apparatus in any wayy appropriateto the case in hand. The nature and location of the Various types of traction and extension devices and the precise manner of support of the patient or his cast within or on the frame R is,` however, a matter depending upon the ingenuity of the surgeon and the requirements of the individual ease, and no attempt is therefore made to detail all possible uses of the invention. And it will be understood that. the present disclosure of atypical embodiment'. of the invention is merely for illustrative purposes, various changes in design, structure and arrangement being possible' without departing fromv the spirit and scope of the invention or ofthe appended claims.

I claim: Y

v1. In a device of the character described, the combination of a rotatable frame comprising spaced end ringsand four parallel, equally spaced longitudinal rails connecting said end rings, said rails consisting of two normally horizontally alined bottom rails and two normally horizontally alined top rails, parallel horizontal bars connected at oppositeends to said two bottom rails, a mattress-supporting platform secured to said parallel cross bars, a mattress supported on the upper lsideof said platform, parallel vertical cross bars spacedlfrom one another longitudinally of said longitudinal rails and connected to the top 'and bottom rai-ls on each side of said rotatable frame, 'parallel horizontal cross bars deta'clnablyi connected at opposite ends to said vertical cross bars at a level above said mattress, a mattress-supporting platform disposed beneath and detachably secured to said last mentioned horizontal cross bars, a mattress secured to the underside of said last mentioned platformsaid two mattresses being spaced apart vertically to provide a space for a patient therebetween, and a cradle in which said frame is rotatable on a longitudinal axis substantially defined by the centers of said end rings.

2. In a device of the character described, the

" combination of a rotatable frame comprising spaced end rings and four parallel, equally spaced longitudinal rails connecting said end rings, said rails consisting of two normally horizontally alined bottom rails and two normally horizontally alined top rails, parallel horizontal bars connected at opposite ends to said two bottom rails,

a mattress-supporting platform secured to saidv parallel cross bars, a mattress supported on the upper side of said platform, parallel vertical cross bars spaced from one another longitudinally of said longitudinal rails and connected to the top and bottom rails on each side of said rotatable frame, parallel horizontal cross bars detachably connected at opposite ends to said vertical cross bars at a level above said mattress, a mattress supporting platform disposed beneath and detachably secured to said last mentioned horizontal cross bars, a mattress secured to the underside of said last mentioned platform, said two mattresses being spaced apart vertically to provide a space for a patient therebetween, side panels positioned inside and detachably secured to said vertical cross bars, and a cradle in which said frame is rotatable on a longitudinal axis substantially defined by the centers of said end rings.

3. In a device of the character described, the combination of a rotatable frame comprising spaced end rings, a plurality of parallel longitudinal rails extending between said end rings, clamp devices on said end rings slidably embracing said rails and adapted to be clamped thereto,

` a cradle in which said frame is rotatable on a longitudinal aXis substantially defined by the centers of said end rings, and means supported by said longitudinal rails for substantially immobilizing a patient Within said rotatable frame.

4. In a device of the character described, the .combination of a frame comprising spaced end rings adapted to roll in a cradle frame, a plurality of parallel longitudinal rails extending between said end rings, rail supporting means on said end rings slidably embracing said rails, whereby said end rings may be moved toward or from one another on said rails to adjust the spacing distance between the end rings, means for securing said rails against longitudinal moverment with reference to said end rings after adjustment of the spacing distance between the rings has been made, and means supported by said longitudinal rails for substantially immobilizing a patient within said rotatable frame.

5. In a device oi the character described, the combination of a rotatable frame comprising spaced end rings and four parallel, longitudinal rails connecting said end rings, said rails consisting of two normally horizontally alined bottom rails and two normally horizontally alined top rails, parallel Vertical cross bars spaced from lone another longitudinally of the longitudinal rails connected at opposite ends to the top and lbottom rails on each side of said rotatable frame,

top rails, parallel vertical cross bars spaced from one another longitudinally of the longitudinal rails connected at opposite ends to the top and bottom rails on each side of said rotatable frame, parallel vertical cross'bars connected top and bottom to the top and bottom rails on each side of the frame, and arranged in pairs each coin- Vprising individual members on opposite sides of the frame, and said pairs of vertical cross bars being spaced longitudinally of the longitudinal rails, and parallel, horizontal, patient-supporting cross bars detachably connectible at opposite ends to selected points along the lengths of said vertical bars between the upper and lower longitudinal rails on each side of the frame, and cradle means in which said end rings may be rotated.

STUART C. KNOX.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534471 *Nov 4, 1946Dec 19, 1950Norheim Ludwig MRevolving bed
US2690177 *May 25, 1951Sep 28, 1954Hogan Clifford WTraction maintaining turning frame
US3034152 *Nov 20, 1958May 15, 1962Orthopedic Frame CompanyHospital bed
US3107105 *Jun 10, 1960Oct 15, 1963Russell W HerifordStanding support for paraplegics
US3238539 *Sep 5, 1963Mar 8, 1966Koch AlbertRotatable beds for invalids
US4937901 *Nov 4, 1988Jul 3, 1990Brennan Louis GApparatus for turning a patient from a supine to a prone position and vice-versa
US5418990 *Mar 6, 1991May 30, 1995Risasen; BorgeOperation table
US5625913 *Mar 28, 1996May 6, 1997Singleton; William H.Oscillatory bed
US6282736Feb 7, 2000Sep 4, 2001Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Proning bed
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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/607, 5/624, 5/613, 5/621
International ClassificationA61F5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/04
European ClassificationA61F5/04