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Publication numberUS2241600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1941
Filing dateSep 27, 1938
Priority dateSep 27, 1938
Publication numberUS 2241600 A, US 2241600A, US-A-2241600, US2241600 A, US2241600A
InventorsHunsicker Clyde L
Original AssigneeHunsicker Clyde L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for removal of vapor from gases
US 2241600 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May-39 @4L c. L. HUNSICKER MEANS FOR REMOVAL OF VAPOR FROM GASES INVEN'TOR C/yoe Z. #M75/crer ATTORNEY Patented May 13, 1941 PATET ris azimut MEANS FOR REMOVAL 0F VAPOR FROM GASES Clyde L. Hunsicker, San Francisco, Calif. Application September 27, 1938, Serial No. 231,884

5 Claims.

- This invention relates generally to apparatus and methods for the treatment of gaseous mediumsl and is particularly applicable for the removal of water vapor from gases.

It is an object of the invention to provide apparatus of the above character which will afford utmost effective contact between gases and a chemical absorbing medium.

More particularly it is an object of the invention to afford means for effective contact between a stream of gas and a moisture absorbing chemi` cal like calcium chloride, whereby al maximum amount of moisture can be absorbed by apparatus of a given size.

Another object of the invention is to aiord apparatus or means of the above character which will readily adapt itself to repeated re-cycling operations without material deterioration.

. Additionalobjects of the invention will appear from the following description in which the preferred embodiment of the invention has been set forth in detail in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view, partly in crosssection, illustrating apparatus incorporating the present invention. y

`Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional detail taken along the line 2--2 of Fig. 1.

The apparatus illustrated in the drawing consists of a conduit I0 which can be of any convenient contour, and which is adapted to convey a stream of gas to be treated. In Fig. 1, one end of this conduit is shown coupled toa pipe or conduit ll,l for inflow of gas, while the other end is connected to the outflow or discharge conduit l2, The space Within conduitY Il! is occupied by a mass I3 of uncompacted filamentary wool. A wool made of non-corrodible metal can be used to advantage, as for example a`wool of stainless steel. Also I can employ so-called glass wool, made of threads or filaments of spun glass.

Whatever is the character of the filamentary wool employed, it should be such that gas may iiow through theiwool without undue flow resstance.

Interspersed throughout the mass of lamentary wool, and enmeshed within the same. are the fragments il., These fragments are made of loose fibrous material impregnated with a salt or compound having the desired absorptive properties. I prefer in this connection to make use of asbestos or mineral wool, as the fibrous structure of this material is particularly desirable for my purpose, and because mineral wool is inert to most chemicals and gases.

For the purpose of removing moisture from gases, the compound with which the fragments are impregnated is preferably calcium chloride. As is well known; calcium chloride has the property of deliquescence and is capable of absorbing a relatively large amount of moisture. Assuming use ofthis salt, the mineral wool can be impregnated by soaking it in a. hot concenl trated solution of calcium chloride.

After being impregnated lthefragments are enmeshed and distributed throughout the mass of iilamentary wool by applying the fragments to the surface of the wool, after which they are4 worked into the filaments. This working Vin process can be carried out manually, by repeated spreading or distorting the filaments of the wool to cause the fragments of asbestos to penetrate into the interior of the mass. It will be evident that the amount of asbestos fragments so introduced into the lam'entary wool should be insufficient to seriously block flow of gas, but should .be sumcient to afford adequate surface contactA with the stream of gas. i

To facilitate re-cycling operations, the apparatus shown in the drawing iS equipped with eleci asbestos are impregnated' with calcium chloride, there is maximum surface contact with the calcium chloridewith the result that there is an eiective and eflicient absorption of water vapor. A relatively large amount of water may be absorbed by the calcium chloride, Without occasioning any displacement of the salt with respect -to the fragments of asbestos. This is attributed to the fact that even though sufficient water is absorbed by the calcium chloride to cause lthe salt to completely deliquesce to form a liquid. the liquid is retained by the asbestos fiber. To re-genera-te the apparatus it is simply necessary to apply `heat by supplying current to the heating elements I6. vWhen heated vto an elevated temperature, water vapor '.evaporates from the calcium chloride, and the salt is again deposited as a solid upon the asbestos nbers in such form liquid to evaporate Water a hard caked mass resuits which affords a minimum of exposed surface area.

While use of calcium chloride is preferred for absorption of moisture, other chemicals can be employed, as for example potassium lhydroxide which also has the property of deliquescence.

I claim:

1. In means for the removal of vapor irom gases, fragments of fibrous material carrying a vapor absorbing compound, said fragments being enmeshed in a mass of uncompacted lamentary wool.

2. In means for the removal of vapor from gases, fragments of mineral vwool carrying a vapor absorbing compound, said fragments being enmeshed in a mass of uncompacted iilamentary wool, the lamentary wool having non-absorbent characteristics, being of a material which is substantially inert with respect'to chemical reaction with the compound.

3. In means for the removal of water from gases, fragments of brous material carrying a moisture absorbing chemical, said fragments being enmeshed in a mass of uncompacted lamentary wool having non-absorbent characteristics.

4. In means for the removal of watervapor from gases, an uncompacted mass of non-absorbent wool adapted for disposition in a stream of gas to be ltreated, and fragments'of mineral wool carrying a. vapor absorbing' compound, said fragments being enmeshed in and interspersed through said mass.

5. In means for the removal of vapor from gases, fragments of fibrous material carrying a vapor absorbing compound, said fragmentsbeing enmeshed in a mass of filamentary wool and supported by said wool in spaced apart relation, said wool being uncompacted and being free oi.' coating and said fragments providing the only vapor absorbing medium in said mass.

CLYDE L.l HUNSICKER.

Vapor

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2957828 *Apr 4, 1956Oct 25, 1960Mansfield Stanley JDesiccant for odor and moisture control
US3382141 *Nov 8, 1963May 7, 1968Mead CorpDesiccant paper
US4615823 *Jan 31, 1985Oct 7, 1986Nippon Gohsei Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaDesiccating agent
US5298231 *Nov 13, 1992Mar 29, 1994Rocky ResearchMethod for achieving high reaction rates in solid-gas reactor systems
US5384101 *Jun 16, 1992Jan 24, 1995Rocky ResearchMethod and apparatus for achieving high reaction rates in solid-gas reactor systems
US5441716 *Aug 9, 1993Aug 15, 1995Rocky ResearchMethod and apparatus for achieving high reaction rates
US5598721 *Mar 28, 1995Feb 4, 1997Rocky ResearchHeating and air conditioning systems incorporating solid-vapor sorption reactors capable of high reaction rates
US5628205 *Feb 16, 1995May 13, 1997Rocky ResearchRefrigerators/freezers incorporating solid-vapor sorption reactors capable of high reaction rates
US5666819 *Feb 23, 1996Sep 16, 1997Rocky ResearchRapid sorption cooling or freezing appliance
US6224842May 4, 1999May 1, 2001Rocky ResearchHeat and mass transfer apparatus and method for solid-vapor sorption systems
US6276166Jul 20, 1999Aug 21, 2001Rocky ResearchAuxiliary thermal storage heating and air conditioning system for a motor vehicle
US6282919Jul 20, 1999Sep 4, 2001Rocky ResearchAuxiliary active motor vehicle heating and air conditioning system
US6415625Jul 9, 2001Jul 9, 2002Rocky ResearchAuxiliary active motor vehicle heating and air conditioning system
US6453576 *Mar 1, 2001Sep 24, 2002Clearwater, Inc.Control of solids deposition from used desiccant solution
US6736194Dec 7, 2000May 18, 2004Rocky ResearchHeat and mass transfer apparatus and method for solid-vapor sorption systems
WO2003035247A1 *Oct 16, 2002May 1, 2003SolvayDesiccant mass, method for obtaining same and use thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification252/194, 55/527, 502/407, 96/118, 502/400
International ClassificationB01D53/02, B01D53/26
Cooperative ClassificationB01D53/261, B01D53/02
European ClassificationB01D53/02, B01D53/26B