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Publication numberUS2241670 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1941
Filing dateMar 12, 1938
Priority dateMar 12, 1938
Publication numberUS 2241670 A, US 2241670A, US-A-2241670, US2241670 A, US2241670A
InventorsMcmaster Archie J
Original AssigneeRayolite Rifle Range Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric target range
US 2241670 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 13, 1941-. A. J. MCMASTER 2,241,670

` ELECTRIC TARGET RANGE Filed March 12, 1958 6 sheets-Sheet 1 May 13, 1941 A. J. McMAs-rER y 2,241,670

ELECTRIC TARGET RANGE Filed 'March l2, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Hlm 1 "1 I@ @2L Pw@ May 13, 1941. A. J. MCMASTER ELECTRIC TARGET RANGE s sheets-sheet :s

Filed March l2, 1938 INSULATION Q Q QQQQQ QQQQQQQ QQQQQ May 13,

A. J.' McMAsTER ELECTRIC TARGET RANGE Filed March 12, 1938 )man uw? 34 I fwra- 7'1/55 Il 37 @www AMP 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 DECORATIVE ./6/7'7'5 TARGET Pfr/MARI May 13, 1941.

A. J. MCMASTER l' ELECTRIC TARGET RANGE Filed March l2, 1938 .5 A5665? da .34 Ill A56 f .34 HHH i 3?/ REL AY 6 Sile-ets-Sheet 5 |73? /04 MA. ,wg/HER /69 PUTE C/,c/f/

M6, REL/:y 7 J4@ /68 /00 /49 i @ECW/YER #547m /24/05," www5/FORME? SECONDARY HM/wmmmf-Ww 000 M070@ CAM May 13, 1941. A1 J. MCMASTER '2,241,670

ELECTRI C TARGET RANGE GUN LAMP M0701? CAM .g f6@ ECQR/I T/ VE LAMPS J7@ y?? for /f/ da@ Mejas/f Patented May 13, 1941 2,1241,6no ELECTRIC TARGET RANGE Archie J. McMaster, Highland Park, Ill., assignor to Rayolite RieItangeCompany, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Oklahoma Application March 12., 1938, Serial No. 195,443

14 Claims'.

An object of the present invention ccnsists in i the provision of new and novel target arrangements for target games.

Another object consists in the provision of a targetY game apparatus which presents a realistic game tcl the player and which. simulates actualsituations in which firearms are used.

A- fin-ther object consists in the provision of target game apparatus which requires the player to change his aim for each shot and which prevents the player from attempting to correct an erroneous aim by taking repeat shots at the target.

A further object is the provision o target game and apparatus therefor Which emphasizes skill and marksmanship.

Av further object is the provision o apparatus for presenting to a player a number of targets, one at a time, and for brief intervals, and for requiring` the player to take his aim and ire quickly.

A further object of the present invention consists in the provision of apparatus for presenting a number of targets, one at a time, in such a manner that the targets are made to appear to be presented at random.

Still a: dilerent object of the present inven tion consists of the provision of anI improved electrical control system for a target game for accomplishing the above enumerated objects.. It includes the provision of a shot control relay which requires resetting after each shot.y It includes the provision of a game and target control timer for controlling the presentation of targets,Y for turning the targets on and off and for controlling the resetting of the shot control relay. It includes also the provision of target indicating lamps controlled by the game and. target control timer for indicating the on and off conditions of the targets as Well as a reset relay in the circuit to said lamps: to reset the shot control timer during the orf conditions of the targets and to permit shots to be: made only during the on conditions of. the targets.

These and other objects of the present invention will appear as the description proceeds.

In order better to acquaint those skilled. in the art with the teachings and practice of my present invention, I noW shall describe a specific embodiment of the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification and in Which:

Figure 1. is a general View in perspective of agame apparatus embodying my present invention; Figure 2 is a View of the target field thereof;

Figure 31isa side elevation in section illustrating the` construction of one of the individual photoelectricv targets, the same being taken along the line 3-7-3 in Figure 2`;

Figure 4 isa sectional View showing the mechanism of the light projecting gun;

Figures5 and 6 respectively are front and side elevations of a motor driven target control and game control timer included in the apparatus of my present invention;`

Figures 7 and 8 are frontv elevation and side sectional viewsv of the shotcontrol timer used in the apparatus of my present invention, Figure 8 beingx aA section along the line 3--3 of Figure 'I taken. in` thedirection indicated bythe arrows;

Figure 9 is a schematic diagram showing the complete electric circuit connections; and,

Figures 10., 11,.1-2,'13 and 14 are across the line diagrams of the circuit connections shown schematically in Figure 9.

Referring to- Figures 1 and 2, the apparatus of the present invention includes a cabinet itl which. houses the targets and the control mechanism, and includes alsoA a light projecting gun Ilr connected theretol by an electric cable I2. The gun Il' is adapted to be held in the hand of the player of the apparatus and is of such size, shape and appearance as to simulate an ordinary pistol. An open compartment I4 is provided for receiving the gun ll when the machine is not being played'. The cabinet is,v equipped With a coin chute I3 intowhich a` coinlmay be inserted for setting the apparatus into operation. The

cabinet` is equipped with: front and side glass panels enclosing, an empty space, at the back of which is located a target field I6.

Preferably the targetveld I6 includesl` a glass panelb having painted thereon a number of representationsy of individual animals constituting parts of individual targets 2 IA to 25 inclusive,

The painted animals of the targeteld i5v are set in a decorative background (background de tail not shown) and on each animal is painted the outline of a` bulls-eye, the center of which is leftunpainted. The pictures of the animals are painted with translucent paint while the background preferably is made opaque (as by backing with., opaque paint or the like) so as to prevent light from being transmitted therethrough. The targetsY are intended to be shot at in turn (-as Will be explained hereafter) and to this end electric lamps are located behind the individual pictures of the animals and are adapted to be controlled to illuminate the animals one ata time for indicating the times at Which the various targets are to be shot at. A photo tube is located behind each target and is adapted tov respond to the light beam projected by the gun Il to actuate a signaly device such as a bell (not shown in Figure 1)v provided for indicating hits. In addition, a series of painted translucent numbers or legends 3| are located across the upper portion of the target eld for indicating the total number of hits or the score of the player during each game. A series of electric lamps, called score lamps, are located behind the individual numbers and are adapted to be lighted one at a time to illuminate the number which represents the players score at any particular time. 'I'hese lights, like the bell, are controlled by the photo tubes of the targets. Additional lamps I8 are provided in the cabinet to illuminate the target eld from the viewing side.

'I'he gun i, the photo tubes of the targets and the score lamps and bell are controlled to permit each photo tube to control the score lamps and bell only while its particular target is on, to permit only one shot each time a target is presented and to denne each shot. The details of the apparatus for accomplishing this control and its mode of operation will be described more fully hereinafter.

The machine is intended to be played and operated by the player as follows: The cabinet lamps i3 burn continuously to illuminate the target eld i3 at all times. When the machine is idle, one of the targets in the field may be brightly illuminated from behind by its own target lights, this being the last target which was presented to the last person playing the machine. In addition, the light behind one of the numbers in the score register 3| will be lighted showing the final score made by the previous player. The player will take the light projecting gun out of the compartment |4 and will insert a coin into the coin chute I3 to set the apparatus into operation. Immediately the hit register will return to Zero. That is, the light indicating the previous score will be extinguished and the character zero or the word hits will be illuminated instead. Also, the single target which remained lighted from the previous game will be darkened and presently another one of theV targets will.

be illuminated and will remain so for a few seconds after which it will be darkened. Presently, still another one of the targets will be illuminated for a similar period of time. This continues until the end of the game, at which time each of the ve targets 2| to 25 inclusive will have been illuminated four times, making a total of targets presented to the player. Each time one of the targets is illuminated in the manner described 4above it is also put in condition to be shot at with the light projecting gun That is, it is turned on. If the gun is properly aimed at the marked bulls-eye on the illuminated target and fired by pulling the trigger, a hit will be made. This will cause the bell to be sounded inside the cabinet, and .the light on the hit register 3| will change to indicate the additional hit. That is, each time `a hit is made a number one unit greater will be illuminated. Thus, the rst hit will cause the numeral l to be illuminated; the second, the numeral 2; etc. The player is given only one -shot at each presentation of a target. That is, when one of the animal targets, 2| to 25, is illuminated it is put in condition to be shot at and the shooting control apparatus is put in condition for operation. After each shot is taken the shooting circuit is left in inoperative condition and is reset so as to operate onlywhen the next target is illuminated, ythat is, turned on..

Thus the player has 20 tar-gets presented to him to be shot at and he is permitted one shot each time a target is presented. After the 20th target has been presented, the apparatus returns to its idle condition, leaving illuminated the number of the score register 3| which indicates the players linal score. Twenty hits constitutes a perfect score.

Referring to Figure 3, the various targets include portions of the glass panel 33 of the target eld I6 already referred to upon which the animal illustrations are painted.

The section of Figure 3 is taken through .the target 22. The target 22 includes the animal illustration and the bulls-eye painted on the glass panel 33, The translucent portion which constitutes the animal illustration is indicated by the reference numeral 29. The opaque background surrounding the animal illustration ls indicated by the reference numeral 30.

The target 22 includes also a photoelectric tube or photo tube 34 and a pair of target illuminating lamps 31 of which only one is shown in Figure 3. The photo tube 34 is mounted on a steel panel 35 which is spaced behind the glass panel 33 and has an aperture approximately in j register with the bulls-eye of the target, the

photo tube 34 being located behind the steel panel 35 in alignment with the bulls-eye and the aperture of the steel panel. A light tunnel 36 constructed of paper or thin fiber lsheet and extraneous light, such as from the lamp-,s 31

which serve to illuminate the target illustration. The lamps 31, of which there are two for each target (only one being shown in Figure 3), also are mounted in the steel panel 35 and are located behind the translucent portion 29 of the glass panel 33 which carries the illustration of lamps such as the lamp 38.

.the animal.

The score register 3| also is painted on the glass panel 33 and is illuminated by a series of Light bailles, such as the baffle 39, consisting of pieces of dark felt or the like, are positioned between the separate lamps 38 so as to prevent each lamp from illuminating any number or character of `the score register 3| other than the one behind which it is located.

. The light projecting gun Il is illustrated in detail in Figure 4. It includes two hollow castings (only one being shown in Figure 4) which constitute the case for the gun mechanism and which are shaped to represent a pistol, The mechanism is mounted in the casting 4|, shown in Figure 4. The other casting is similar in shape `and ts onto the casting 4| to completely enclose the mechanism and complete the representation of the pistol. Included in the gun II are a lamp 43 and a lens 44, the filament of the lamp and the axis of the lens being located on the approximate axis of the simulated gun barrel. A baille 45 formed in the casting 4| and located in front of the lamp 43 has an aperture just large enough to accommodate .the beam required to illuminate the entire face of the lens 44. Located just in front of this aperture in the baille 45 is a shutter 46 which is adapted to be removed from the path of the light beam by means of a solenoid magnet having a coil 41. The lamp 43, lens 44 and shutter 46 constitute the light projecting `apparatus of the gun,

The gun also includes a small single pole double throw snap switch i. rilhis snap switch includes anormally open contact gapl 55 anda normally closed con-tact gap- 5S; It is operated bya pivoted trigger member 52 through a suit-v able lever- 53; Preferably, the lever 53 consists of a cantilever spring adapted to provide an even tension ofsufiicient strength on the trigger member 52 so that thesameieels firm and comfortable in the han-d of; the player. Conveniently, the trigger snap switch 5| may be of the type shownv and described in U. S. Patent 1,960g020. This switch is small and compact andY can be operated with a slight motion of its actuating member. The cable I2, which includes the-severall conductors required for making the necessary electrical connections tothe gun, enters the gun near the heel of' the. butt and' is@ firmly anchored to the casting 4I by means of a clamp 54.

The two castings of the gun il, when riveted together make the entire interior mechanism of the: gun inaccessible for tampering, excepting onlyv the lamp 43. The lamp is enclosed by a formed. metal hood 42' which ts over the two maink castings after they have Ibeen fitted together. Gun sights 48 and 49 are provided to assist. the player in aiming the gun atthe target. Strips of felt are laid over the joint betweenthe two castings of the gun (of which casting. 4l is: one) to prevent light from emerging from the crack between them.

The machine embodying mypresent invention utilizes a target and game control timer 5.8 illustra-ted in Figures 5' and 6. It includes a steel plate.- fupon which are mounted a series of oontact, stacks 6|, 62, $3, 54 and 65 which are disposed in a radial pattern about a rotating contactor. assembly 61. The several contact stacks El, 62, etc., are spaced 36 (2/20of a, circle) apart. Each contact stack carries two stationary contacts such: asA the ycontacts i-a and Sl-b `carried' by the stack Si. One contact of each stack liesv on each side of the disk 68, of the rotating contactor assembly 61. The disk 68- on each face. thereof carries two double ended, resilient, contactor strips (four in all) 1l, 12, 13 and 14. The two contactor strips on each side of the disc 68- (such as: the' strips 1| and 1"2) cross each other atan angleof 54 (/go) of a circle).

These resilient contactor strips 1I etc., are adapted toslideover the stationary: contacts carriedl in the stacks El etc., and make electrical connections or engagements therewith. Corre-A sponding contactor strips such as 1l and 13 on the; opposite faces of the disc G8 are aligned with each other so' that the two contacts of a single contact stack, such as the contacts (i4-a and i4-b of the stack 64, are engaged simultaneously by two of the rotating contactors such as 1f and 13. The two stationary contacts' of a single contact stack, such as the contacts G11-a and. 64-b of the stack 54, are assigned tothe control of the photo tube and the illuminating Iampsl respectively of: a single target and serve to close the circuits `to the photo tube and lamps of a single target simultaneously.. will" be explained more in detail presently. The arrangement of the two contactors, such as 1I and 12 'at an angle 4of- 54, as shown, causes these two contactors toengage the several stationary contacts of the stacks 6l, 12, etc., in an irregular order simulating a random order of engagement. The order of engagement of the contacts of the various stacks G'I, 62, etc., as the contactor assembly 61` rotates clockwise from theposition in which it is shownin Figure 5; is as follows: 6|?,

65,y 62, 6|, 63, 62, 641, 63, 65, 64. These ten enumerated engagementsresult from a 180 degree rotation of contactor assembly 61. These same ten engagements are repeated in the same order during'each successive 180 degree rotation.

The contactor assembly 5.1 is adapted to be rotated by an electric motor 1U. Preferably this motor is of small size and of the. split phase, self-starting, induction type, and includesV a geared speed reducer for driving the contactor assembly 61 at a low speed, such as, for example, the speed of one revolution per minute.

The' contacting surfaces of the stationary con tacts carried. in the stacks 6l, 12,. etc., and the contactorsll, etc., are of such. size that,. as the contactor assembly E1' rotates, theI moving. con- 'tactors 1l, etc.. do not simultaneously engage contacts in1 two of the stacks' 6l', 5'2, etc., but rather leave short periods during which none of the stationary contacts are engaged. For example; as--the contactor assembly 61 isA rotated by theY motor 10 at a speed of: one revolution per minute in a clockwise direction out of the posi tion in which it is shown in Figure 5, the contactors 1I and 'i3'l will disengage the contacts 64-a and Sli-b of' the stack 64' substantially simultaneously. Half a second` thereafter, the contactors 1-2 and 14 will engage the contacts of l-a and SI-b of the stack 6! and will continue in engagement therewith for a period of two andY one-half seconds when they will disengage. Another half a second later the contactors 1l" and/13 will engage the contacts [i5- a andfGE--boi the'stack G5, etc.

Several: contactor strips 1l, 12 and the corresponding strips on the opposite face of the disc 68 all are grounded to the frame', or plate, 60. The several contacts carried in.4 the-stacks 6|, 62, etc., are insulated from eachv other and from the plate 50 by insulating pieces included in the stacks.

The disc 68 of the' contactor assembly 61 is of insulating material, is circular andis provided with a notch 15 in its periphery. A stack of contacts16., consisting of two pairs of engaging contact blades-which are adapted to remain open under their own tension to provide contact gaps 'i8 and 19. These contactV blades carry a projection 11 which is adapted to ride against the edge of. the disc 68 to hold the Contact gaps 1.8 and 19 closed and to fall into the notch 15 to open the contact gaps-18 and 18. The stack 1S includes two strips of. insulating material t2v for insulating the two sets of contacts from each other and. also for insulating them from accldental contact,- with the plate 6B'. These contacts are. utilized for controlling the duration of each game as will be explained more in detail presently. An additional stack of contacts carries Ia pair of contacts S0, the tension of which is adapted to keep them closed. A pin 8| carried on the insulating disc E8' is adapted tov engage these contacts to open them and then disengage the contacts to permit them to close a short time priorl to the time at which the notch 1'5 comes into register with the projection 11 to open the contacts 18 and 19;

Figures 7 and 8 illustrate a shot control timer or slow relay 83. This timer consists of an air dash-pot solenoid magnet, together with Various contacts operated by the plunger or core thereof. The whole shot control relayr 83- is mounted on a steel panel 85. To this panel' is fastened a steel magnet frame t6 containingv a coil 81- through which extends a' brass tube 83.

The upper end of this brass tube 88 carries an iron plug 89 which directly engag-es the iron of the frame 86 to provide low magnetic reluctance therebetween. A core 90 i'lts inside the brass tube 88 and slides therein. It is adapted to be drawn by the pull of the current in the coil 81 up into engagement with the iron plug 89. The plug 89 includes a shading coil 9| of copper or the like so that a continuous pull may be exerted n the core 98 when the coil 531 is energized with alternating current.

The core 98 is only a few thousandths of an inch smaller in diameter than the interior diameter of the brass tube 88 so that the air escapes between the wall of the tube 88 and the core 98 comparatively slowly.

The core 90 is adapted to descend under the action of gravity and to have its descent retarded by the dash-pot action resulting from its close fit in the tube 38. Due to the comparatively great length of the core 90 it provides a better seal against the passage of air than does the pin 92 and its cap 93 in the plug 89. Actually it is desirable to enlarge a portion of the bore of the plug 89 as at 96 to reduce the electiveness of the seal provided by the pin 92 so as to permit the core 90 to descend sufliciently fast. The time of descent should be in the neighborhood of one-sixth of a second.

The plug 89 has a central bore containing a pin 92 which is capped by an insulating button 93. This pin 92 is adapted to be lifted by the core 90 as it comes to the top of its stroke and stops against the plug 89. A pin 94 carried by the plunger 90 extends axially from the lower end thereof and carries at its lowermost end an insulating button 95.

The top of the panel 85 is bent forward to carry a stack of contact blades 98. These contacts provide a normally open contact gap 99 and a normally closed gap |00 which are adapted to be operated by means of the plunger 92 and insulated button 93 immediately that the core or plunger 90 of the solenoid begins its descent. A stack of contacts |02 is carried on a similar bent portion at the bottom of the panel 85. This stack includes a normally open pair of contacts |03 and a normally closed pair |04. These contacts are adapted to be operated when the plunger reaches its lowermost position, that is, when it finishes its descent. The core 90 is adapted to be raised magnetically by means of the coil 81 and to be lowered by gravity.

The machine embodying my present invention includes the various individual pieces of apparatus just described, together with certain other pieces of apparatus to be mentioned presently which are believed to be individually of such conventional and known construction as to require no individual detailed descriptions.

The entire electric circuit is illustrated schematically in Figure 9. The same electric circuit connections are illustrated in the across the line type of diagrams in Figures 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14. The descriptions of apparatus will be directed largely to the schematic diagram of Figure 9 whereas the descriptions of the circuit connections and the operation of the system will be directed particularly to the across the line diagrams of Figures 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14. The across the line type of diagram (or line diagram as it sometimes is referred to) attempts only to show the electrical relations between the various elements of the system and makes no attempt to depict any mechanical relations diagrammatically. Itspurpose is to present the electrical circuits in their simplest form. Diagrams of this type are employed here to facilitate the explanation and undertsanding of the operation of the system. In the across the line type of diagram mechanical relations may be indicated only by legends. In Figures 10 to 14 inclusive, similar legends and names have been applied to parts which are mechanically related to each other in addition to the reference numerals applied thereto. The same reference numerals, legends and names are used to indicate the same parts in both the schematic diagram of Figure 9 and the several across the line diagrams of Figures 9 to 14 inclusive.

Referring particularly to Figure 9, a transformer ||0 having a primary winding and secondary windings H2, H3, ||4, H5, H6, and

\ ||1 supply power to the entire system. The coin chute I3 includes a slide bar |20 and is equipped with contacts |2| which are adapted to be normally closed (that is, closed when the slide bar is withdrawn) and contacts |22 which are adapted to be closed momentarily when the slide bar is moved to its innermost position. A motor maintaining relay |24 having a coil |25 and normally open contacts |29, |21 and |28, is provided for maintaining the motor 10 in operation and for supplementing the contacts 18 and 19 of the target and game control timer 58.

A reset relay |30 having coil |3| normally open contacts |32, and normally closed contacts |33, is arranged to respond to the operation of the 1 target control timer 58 to reset the shot control timer 83 so as to condition it for controlling the operation of the gun each time that a new target is presented.

An `amplifier |36 (not shown in detail in Figure 9) is provided for amplifying the impulses from the photo tube 34, produced therein by the light from the gun to operate a relay |38, which in turn controls a step switch |4|, and a bell |45. The step switch 4| in turn controls the score lamps 38. The relay |38 includes a coil |39 and contacts |40, the coil |39 being shunted by a condenser |31. The step switch |4| includes a coil |42, a rotating contacter |43 and a series of stationary contacts |44. Eachof the contacts |44 is connected to a separate one of the score lamps 38.

The step switch I4| is adapted to step its contactor |43 forward from one stationary contact |44 to the next, (one contact at a time) each time that its coil |42 is energized. It is further .y adapted to return its contactor |43 to a zero or |4| and the mechanism by which it is reset from the coin chute |3 are not shown inasmuch as such apparatus is well known and the details of the same do not constitute any part of the present invention. The bell |45 preferably is of the single stroke type.

Two targets 22 and 23 are represented diagrammatically in Figure 9. As shown, target 22, for example, includes the photo tube 34 having one terminal connected to the amplifier |36 and the other to the contact 62-a of the target control timer 58. It also includes the two target lamps 31 shunted by a resistor |56 connected to the contact 62-b of the target control timer 58. The remaining targets include similar elements andare connected to the amplifier |36 and the lshunted across lthe lamps 31.

lamps 31 and .resistor vtarget and game .control timer 56 `in :the same manner.

The detail-s of theamplifier |36 are shown only in Figure l0. vIt includes va vacuum tube |45 which has a rectifier section |41, .an .amplier section .|46 and ra heater |49 forheating .the cathodesof both the ampl-ier and `rectiiiersections |41 and |48.

The lamplifier sect-ion |48 is of the vpentode Atype and .includes a cathode |65, a control .grid |66, a `screen .grid .161, a 4.suppressor ygrid 68 and .an anode |69.

A resistor |56 suppliesthe coupling .impedance between the various -photo tubes of the `targetsrZl to 25 and the amplifier section |66. .A condenser v|'5.| .and `voltage dividing resistors Aandpotentiometers |52, l|53 `and 1.54 serve to nlter .the direct curr-ent :output of .therectifier 4|61 and to supply the various voltages required by the photo .tubes and vthe amplifier .section 1460i the valve M6. A milliarnmeter .L55.isincludedinlseries with the anode |69 of the amphi-ler section |48.

Referring to Figure l-.0, .-125 volts alternating current isadapted toibesupplied from vthe :transfiormer secondary 1| |5.tothe1notor 16 for .operating `the ,same and .also .tothe rectifier. |4.1f.or providing .a uni-directional .voltage .across the conductors '|6| .and 16.2., `conductor |62 .being positive. This .furnishes .direct .current for the .operation of the amplifier section |68 and :the various phototubes of the targets. 'The-.cell .coupling `resistor |56 :is connected 'between 'the .negative conductor '|61 and the control grid |66 ofthe ampli'er |48. The cathodes of .all 'the phototubes',

such as the phototube '34, fare connected to the grid |66 of the .amplifier and .their anodes are adapted to be connected through the .contactors 1| and 12 of Ythe target control .and game timer 58 to thejnnction between the voltage dividing resistors |53 and |54, which ,junction has a ,potential positive with respect to the .conductor 6]. The cathode |65 of 'theamplier |48 is connected vto an adjustable tap |'1| of .the loleeder resistor or potentiometer |52 toprovlide .an adjustment of the grid bias .voltage applied lto the amplifier. vThe coil |36 of the relay |38 shuntedbythe condenser |31, and also contacts v|66 `and 1|6`4 ofthe shot control'timer L83 are connected inthe circuit with the anode |66 of theamplier section |48.

`The transformer winding |11 is adapted to supply current through the .coil |.3I of the .relay |36 -and'thenceito the target `lamps of a single one of the targets, such as, 'for example, the lamps 31 .of vt-l'ietarget 22, the resistor |56 "being It is desirable to operate the lamps 31 at their full operating l'ternperature, and inasmuch as they .are subject to burn out `under such conditions, it is desirable that the simultaneous lburn-out of two lamps of ia single target be avoided. Inasmuch as the coil |3| of the reset relay |36 is in series `with the lamps, a *burn-out of `one lamp increases the voltage impressed across the remaining lamp.

Therefore, .the resistor .|56 is designed to draw .a large current compared to the individual lamps 31 so that .the Thurn-out of a single lamp reduces the current drain by asmall percentage .compared to the percentage reduction which would .be suffered hy a burn-out of one of the larnps if the resistor |56 were .not employed. Inasmuoh as 3g the relay coil |3| is connected .in .series with .the |56., afburn-out .of .one .of thelarnps '31 raises the'vol'tage applied tothe remaining lamp, because of .the reduced voltage drop in the Vco'il 13|.

A certainnum'ber of volt.-

amperes are required at the coil |3| for operation of the relay |36. If the current 4is increased the relay coil may be designedfor a lower voltage by giving it a lower impedance. Consequently the change of current resulting from a lamp burnout produces a smaller change in the voltage drop in the coil |3| and therefore in the voltage impressed across the remaining lamp. The presence of the resistor |56 serves to reduce the amount -by which the voltage rises on the remaining lamp when one of the lamps burns out.

The machine just described operates as follows: The `heater |49 of the' valve |66 is energized continuously by the secondary winding of the transformer H4 (Figure 10). Likewise the decorative lights I8 (Figure 1l) are energized continuously from the transformer winding H6. Some one of the score lights 38 (Figure 13) is energized at all times from the transformer winding ||2 through the contacter |43 and contacts |44 ofthe step switch Ailli. Whenever the contactors 13 and 14 (Figure l0) cf the target control .timer 58 engage one of the stationary contacts lil-b, etc., the corresponding target lights are energized from the transformer winding H1 through the coil i3| of the .reset relay |36.

When a coin is inserted in the coin chute |3 (Figure 9) and .the slide bar |26 thereof is pushed in, the rotating contact arm |43 of the score switch 14| is returned mechanically (mechanism notshown) to its zero or starting position. Also, the slide har |26 (Figure 9) engages the contacts |22 to close them and (in Figure 1l) energine the coil |25 .of the motor maintaining relay |24 (the contacts 86 of the target control timerbeing closed at the time). When the motor maintaining .relay |24 picks up, it closes its contacts |26 (Figure l1) which shunt the contacts |22 of the coinchute so as to maintain the coil |25 energized after the contacts |22 open. The operation of the relay |224 also closes the contacts ,|28 (Figure 10.) which sets the motor 16 of the target and .game control timer 56 into operation. Under this condition the contacts |2| (Figure 10) of the coin chute i3 are open so tha-t the photoelectric amplier remains deenergized except for the heater |66 which is energized continuously. The slide bar |26 of coin chute I3 (Figure 9) must be withdrawn promptly, .and to this endit conveniently may be provided with a spring (not shown) for returning it to its withdrawn position when released by the player who inserts the coin.

The return of the coin chute to its withdrawn position opens the contacts .|22 (Figure il) and thereafter closes the contacts |2| (Figure l0) to energize the photoelectric amplifier. In this condition the machine is in operation.

Prior to the time that the .slide har |26 of the coin chute .I3 is operated, the core 96 of the shot control timer '63 was in .its released position or lowermost position. Under that condition, its lcontacts |63 (Figure 1l) were open so that the shuttermagnet 41 .could `not he energized. `Also .contacts ,|64 (Figure 10) were open vto prevent operation .of the relay |33. Consequently the ,gun `could not be shot and hits could not be indicated. or recorded. 'I he contacts '66 (Figure 1l) were `open. In addition, the target lamps (Figure lo) of one ci the targets were illuminatedand .the coil Il (Figure 16) of the reset relay |36 was energized. Consequently .contacts y|33 (Figure 1 1.) were open andcontacts |32 (Fig-- ure 11`) were closed. So long as the trigger A52 (Figure 4) of the gun I I is released, the contacts 55 (Figure ll) of the trigger switch are open and the contacts 56 (Figure 1l) are closed.

As the game and target control timer 58 begins its operation, as above described, its rotatage of the transformer winding H3 is impressed` across the coil l to draw up the core 50 (see Figures 7 and 8) to its sealed position. When the core 30 of the shot -control timer 33 reaches its uppermost position, it closes its contacts 89 (Figures 7 and l1) to for the coil 8l, (Figure ll) which circuit includes the normally closed contacts 58 of the trigger switch, the contacts 89 and the resistor |33. The contacts |03 (Figure ll) ofthe shot control timer also are closed when the core 80 is drawn up. Contacts |04 (Figure l0) have closed but contacts |00 have opened so that the plate circuit relay still may not be operated.

Now as the contactors I3 and 'I4 (Figure l0) of the target control timer 58 continue to move and come into engagement with another set of stationary contacts to energize the lights 3l of another one of the targets and also to connect the photoelectric cells thereof to the amplifier, the coil I3! oi' the relay |38 is traversed by the current drawn by the target lamps of the particular target, so that the relay |30 picks up. This opens the contacts |33 (Figure ll) so that the coil 81 of the shot control timer must draw its current through the normally closed contacts 55 of the trigger switch, the contacts 93 of the shot control timer itself and the resistor |73. Also, the contact |32 is closed. In this position of the apparatus, the gun I I is in condition to be shot. 52 (Figure 4) operates the snapswitch 5I to open the contacts 56 and close the contacts 55 (Figure 1l) thereof, This de-energizes the coil 81 so as to permit the core 90 thereof to drop.

It is to be noted that a resistor |14 shunts the" normally closed contacts 5S of the trigger switch. This resistance is comparatively high and permits insufcient current to pass for holding up the core 30. However, it does supply sufficient current to the coil S7 to supply the necessary` coercive force for demagnetizingr the iron structure of the magnet so as to release the core 90 in the event that it should tend to remain held by residual magnetization.

The closing of the contacts the trigger snap Switch 5| energizes the gun lamp 43 and also the coil 41 of the solenoid of the shutter 46 in the gun II, the latter being energized through the contacts |32 of the relay I 30 and the contacts |03 of the shot control timer 83.

The normally closed contacts 56 (Figure 1.1.) of the trigger snap switch 5I, having opened as described above, the core 90 (Figures 7, 8 and 9) of the shot control relay 83 begins to descend. Its initial motion opens the contacts 99 (Figure 11) so that the trigger switch 5| may not be manipulated to re-energize the coil 81, The initial motion of the core 30 also closes contacts |00 (Figure 10) to complete the circuit to the coil |38 of the relay |38.

prepare a holding circuitv A pull on the trigger piece 'Y (Figure 11) of'60 vto correct his aim Thus, in this condition while the core of the shot control timer is descending, the lamp 43 is energized and the shutter 45 (Figures 4 and 9) is withdrawn from the path of the light beam so that the gun projects a beam of light. Also, the plate circuit of the amplifier is completed through thev plate circuit relay |38 so that if the gun is properly aimed at the bulls-eye of the proper target (the one which is on at the time as indicated by its lighted target lamps) the light; from the gun II will energize the proper photoelectric cell to actuate the relay |38 which, in turn, actuates the score switch |4I and the bell |45. This will serve to advance the contactor |43 (Figures 9 and 13) to the next stationary contact |44 of the score switch so as to energize the lamp, such as lamp 38, which is located behind the first score number in the score register 3|.

As already has been explained, the core 90 of the solenoid timer 83 descends slowly because of the retarding eiTect imposed on the core 90 by the dash-pot action of the core 30 in the tube 88. The time required for the descent of the core 90 of the shot timer 83 is the time allowed for the shot. It need be only long enough for the lamp 43 to come up to full brilliance and for the photo tube, the amplifier |36, etc., and the score switch I4| to respond thereto. It is desirable that the time of descent of the core 90 of the shot timer 83, and therefore the time, of the shot, be less than the time required by a person to observe the position of the projected spot of light on the target eld and correct his aim therefrom. For example, I have found that a time of .016 to .015 second produces satisfactory operation of the apparatus, and that that time is much too short to give a person opportunity after observing the position on the target field of the spot of light projected from the gun. When the core S0 reaches its lowermost position, it operates its contacts |03 and |04 (Figures 7 and 8). The contacts |03 (Figure 11) open the circuit through the coil 41 so as to cause the shutter 46 again to obstruct of the light beam in the gun I I; tacts |04 (Figure 10) disconnect of the relay |38 from the amplier so as to leave the scoring apparatus unresponsive to any further illumination of the photo tubes of the targets.

When one of the targets is on properly aimedfat it, the bell |45 and the score switch |4I and lights 38 are responsive to the pull ofthe trigger 52. The pull of the trigger causes the gun I to project a beam of light which illuminates the photo tube of the target, which in turn actuates the relay |38 to operate the bell I 45 and score switch |4|. The shot can be effective onlv if this chain of control is complete Consequently the duration of the shot may be effectively termina-ted either by interrupting the light beam from the gun or by interrupting the chain of control between the photo tube of the target and the score switch I4I and bell |45.

The light beam may be interrupted by means of the shutterI 46 as described herein. It might be also interrupted by extinguishing the lamp 43 the path and the conthe coil |38 and the gun is ,or by employing a shutter at the target to cover operating bell .|45 and the .coil |42 of the score switch i 4|.

Thus, either the opening of the contacts |03 (Figures 9 and l1) or the contacts |04 (Figures 9 and 10) will terminate the responsiveness of the scoring switch |4| to the actuation ofthe trigger switch 5|. Thus, for example, if the contact |03 only were employed, the light beam would be interrupted by the shutter 46, although the score switch remained responsive to an illumination of the photoelectric cells 34. Also, if only the contacts |04 only Were employed the light beam would remain unobstructed but the score switch |4| would be made unresponsive to the illumination of the photo tubes of the targets. If desired, the gun lamp 43 may be de-energized automatically by contacts such as the contacts |03 of the shot control timer 83.

It is desirable that the light beam projected from the gun be interrupted in order to simulate' more faithfully, from the players point of View, the action of a firearm. That is, if the projection of the light beam is initiated and then quickly obstructed, the result will `be an apparent flash simulating the apparent instantaneous ring of a firearm. Also, it is desirable that the contacts |04 be employed for rendering the score switch |4| .unresponsive to an illumination of a photoelectric cell 34 at times when the gun is not being red in order to lessen the possibility of the player or another person from actuating the score switch |4| by directing Vonto the photoelectric cells 34 a light originating elsewhere than the gun Il.

I Vclaim:

1. In a target for electric target ranges, a base structure, a target background member mounted on said structure, a plurality of individual tar-- get elements associated with said background, each such element including a translucent pictorial representation, and means for illuminating it from the rear, and a photosensitive member, and means for shielding said member from said illuminating means while leaving said member exposed to a flash of light directed at the target.

2. In a target for electric ltarget ranges, abase structure, a target background member mounted on said structure, a plurality of individual target elements associated with said background, each such element including a translucent pictorial representation, and means for illuminating it from the rear, and a photosensitive member, and means for shielding said member from said illuminating means while leaving said member exposed to a flash of light directed at the target, including a passage member extending from said photosensitive member toward said pictorial representation and terminating closely adjacent the rear thereof.

3. In combination in a shooting gallery, a stationary target continuously in view includingY a photoelectric cell, a gun including a trigger and also including means adapted to project a beam vo-:t' light, said gun v.being adapted to be aimed manually at said target, signal means adapted to be actuated by said photoelectric `cell Afor indicating a hit, target control means for turni-ng said target on and oli repeatedly yand for maintaining said target on each time suiciently lo-ng to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull the trigger,- game limiting means for defining a cycle Aof 'operation of isaid target control means-and for stoppingeaid tar.-

v get control means at the yend .of/said cycle, said cycle including. .a predetermined number of on conditions :of said target, starting means adapt- ,ed to be actuated to start said target control means, target indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and off conditions of said target and then simultaneously turning oil said target .and said indicating means, sho-t control means operable when said gun is .aimed properly while said target is on to respond to a pull of said .trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating :the `projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate said photoelectric cell and by ypermitting said signal means to respond to .the illumination of said photoelectri-c cell `whereby to indicate ,a hit, said lshot control means being operative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive 'to the pulled condition of said trigger within a period of time after Ithe initiation of the projection of the light beam which is of less duration than the .time required :by a person aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and .correct his aim therefrom, said signal :means :being unresponsive to a 4pull of said trigger when said target is off regardless of vwhether or not the gun is aimed properly.

4. In 'combination in a shooting gallery, a stationary target continuously in View including a photoelectric cell, a gun including a trigger and also including means `adapted to project a beam of light, said gun being adapted to be m'med manual-ly at said target, signal lmeans .adapted to be actuated by said p-hotoelectric cell for indicating a hit, `target control means for turning :said target on and oil repeatedly and for maintaining said target on each Atime s vciently long to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull the trigger, game limiting means `for defining a cycle of operation of said target ycontrol means and for stopping said target control .means at the end of said cycle, said cycle including a predetermined number of fon v'conditions of Ksaid target, starting means adapted lto be actuated to start said ytarget control means, target indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and off conditions of said target, shot control means operable when said gun is aimed Aproperly at Isai-d target while said target vis on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actnate said `signal `means by initiating the projection Vof said beam of light 'from said gun to illumina-tesaid Yphotoelectrilc ycell and by perrvtherefrom, whereby to simulate a shot Vfrom a firearm.

5. In combination in a shooting gallery, a plurality of targets all of which are continuously in view each of which includes a photoelectric cell,

4`a gun including a trigger and also including means adapted to project a beam of light, said gun being adapted to be aimed manually at said targets, signal means adapted'to be actuated by said photoelectric icells for indicating hits, target control means for turning on said targets one at a time and for keeping each target on for a length of time suiiicient to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull said trigger, indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and oi conditions of said targets, shot control means operable when said gun is aimed properly at a target which is on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating the projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate the photoelectric cell of said:`

target and by permitting said signal means to respond to the illumination of said photoelectric cell whereby to indicate a hit, said shot control means being operative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive to the Pulled condition of said trigger within a period of time after the initiation of the projection of the light beam which time is of less duration than the time required by a person aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and correct his aim therefrom, whereby to simulate a shot from a firearm.

6. In combination in a shooting gallery, a plurality of targets all of which are continuously in view each of which includes a photoelectric cell, a gun including a trigger and also including means adapted to project a beam of light, said gun being adapted to be aimed manually at said targets, signal means adapted to be actuated by said photoelectric cells for indicating hits, target Icontrol means for turning on said targets one at a time and for keeping each target on" for a length of time suicient to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull said trigger whereby to present said targets one at a time to be shot at with said gun, indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and ol conditions of said targets,V game limiting means for stopping said target control means when a predetermined number of presentations of individual targets has been eiected, starting means adapted to be actuated to start said target control means, shot y control means operable when said gun is aimed properly at a target which is on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating the projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate the photoelectric Icell of said target and by permitting said signal means to respond to the illumination of said photoelectric cell whereby to indicate a hit, said shot control means being operative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive to the pulled condition of said trigger within a period of time after the initiation of the projection of the light beam which time is of less duration than the time required by a person aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and correct his aim therefrom, whereby to simulate a shot from a firearm.

'7, In combination in a shooting gallery, a plurality of targets each of which includes a phoeating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and ,off conditions of said targets, game limiting means for stopping said target control means when a predetermined number of presentations of individual targets has been effected, starting means adapted to be actuated to start said target control means, shot control means operable when said gun is aimed properly at a target which is on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating the projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate the photoelectric cell of said target and by permitting said signal means to respond to the illumination of said photoelectric cell whereby to indicate a hit, said shot control means being cperative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive to the pulled condition of said trigger within a period of time after the initiation of the projection of the light beam which time is of less duration than the time required by a person aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and correct his aim therefrom, whereby to simulate a shotl from a rearm, said shot control means including shot limiting means for preventing said signal means from responding to additional pulls of the trigger during the interval that a single target is on", whereby to prevent a hit to be indicated by any except the first shot taken during said interval that a single target is on,

8. In combination in a shooting gallery, a plurality of targets all of which are continuously in view each of which includes a photoelectric cell, a gun including a trigger and also including means adapted to project a beam of light, said gun beingadapted to be aimed manually at said targets, signal means adapted to be actuated by said photoelectric cells for indicating hits, target control means for repeatedly turning on said targets one at a time in irregular order of occurrence and for keeping each target on for a period of time sufficient to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull said trigger, whereby to present said targets one at a time in irregular order to be shot at, indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and oli conditions of said targets, game limiting means for stopping said target control means when a predetermined number of presentations of individual targets has been effected, starting means adapted to be actuated to start said target control means, shot control means operable when said gun is aimed properly at a target which is on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating the projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate the photoelectric cell of said target and by permitting said signal means to respond to the illumination of said photoelectric cell whereby to indicate a hit, said shot control means being operative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive to the pulled condition of said trigger within a period of time after the initiation of the projection of the light beam which time is of less duration than the time required by a person aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and correct his aim therefrom, whereby to simulate a shot from a rearm.

9. In combination in a shooting gallery, a plurality of stationary targets all of which are continuously in view disposed in a target field, each target including a photoelectric cell, a gun including a trigger and also including means adapted to project a beam of light, said gun being adapted to be aimed manually at said targets, signal means adapted to be actuated by said photoelectric cells for indicating hits, target control means for turning on the targets in said i'leld one at a time in an irregular order as respects the respective locations of said targets in said eld and for keeping each target on for a period of time suihcient to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull said trigger, whereby to present said targets to be shot at one at a time in a manner simulating a random presentation thereof, indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and ofi conditions of said targets, game limiting means for stopping said target control means when a predetermined number of presentations of individual targets has been eiected, starting means adapted to be actuated to start said target control means, shot control means operable when said gun is aimed properly at a target which is on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating the projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate said photoelectric cell and'by permitting said signal means to respond to the illumination of said photoelectric cell whereby to indicate a hit, said shot control means being operative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive to the pulled condition of said trigger Within a period of time after the initiation of the projection of the light beam which time is of less duration than the time required by a person aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and correct his aim therefrom, whereby to simulate a shot from a firearm.

10. In combination in a shooting gallery, a plurality of stationary targets disposed in a target field, each target including a photoelectric cell, a gun including a trigger and also including means adapted to project a beam of light, said gun being adapted to be aimed manually at said targets, signal meansl adapted to be actuated by said photoelectric cells for indicating hits, target control means for turning on the targets in said field one at a time in an irregular order as respects the respective locations of said targets in said eld and for keeping each target on for a period of time sufficient to permit a person to take aim with said gun and pull said trigger, whereby to present said targets to be shot at one at a time in a manner simulating a random presentation thereof, indicating means controlled by said target control means for indicating the on and off condition-s of said targets, game limiting means for stopping said target control means when a predetermined number of presentations of individual :targets has been effected, starting means adapted to be actuated to start said target control means, shot control means operable when said gun is aimed properly at a target which is on to respond to a pull of said trigger to actuate said signal means by initiating the projection of said beam of light from said gun to illuminate said photoelectric cell and by permitting said signal means to respond to the illumination of said photoelectric cell whereby to indicate a hit, said shot control means being operative automatically to render said signal means unresponsive to the pulled condition of said trigger Within a period of time after the initiation of the projection of the light beam which time is of less duration than the time required by a person. aiming the gun to observe the position of the projected beam and correct his aim therefrom, whereby to simulate a shot from a iirearm, said shot control means including shot limiting means for preventing said signal means from responding to additional pulls of the trigger during the time that a single target is on, whereby to permit a hit to be indicated only by the first shot taken during the interval that a single target is on 11. In a gun game, in combination, a plurality of targets having stationary positions, an indicating means associated with each target, a photoelectric cell associated with each target, an amplier, switching means for energizing any one of said indicating means and connecting the associated cell to the amplier, and an electric motor for continuously operating said switching means to energize the indicating means and connect the associated cell of individual targets in sequence.

l2. In a target range a pluralityT of xed targets, a, photosensitive member lassociated with each, a light gun having a trigger, a light source associated with the gun, means for causing the light source upon the actuation of the trigger to project a flash of aimed light upon any selected target, .automatic means for successively conditioning one target after another for operation, a coin controlled mechanism and means controlled thereby for operating the target conditioning means and for stopping such operation after a predetermined number of targets have been conditioned and means forming a part of the target conditioning means for limiting the length of time during which each successive target remains yconditioned for operation, and indicating means controlled by the photosensitive member for indicating hits on the targets.

13. In a target range a plurality of fixed targets, a photosensitive member associated with each, a light gun having a trigger, a light source associated with the gun, means for causing the light source to project a flash of aimed light upon any one of said targets selected by the operator upon the actuation ofthe trigger, means for conditioning a plurality of successive targets for operation, a coin controlled mechanism, and means controlled thereby for operating the target conditioning means and for stopping such operation after a predetermined number of target conditioning operations have been completed.

14. In a target range a plurality of continuously visible xed targets, a photosensitive memer associated with each, a light gun having a trigger, a light source associated with the gun, means for causing the light source upon the actuation of the trigger to project a flash of aimed light upon any selected target, automatic means for successively conditioning one target after another for operation, a coin controlled mechanism and means controlled thereby for operating the target conditioning means and for stopping such operation after a predetermined number of targets have been conditioned and means forming a part of the target conditioning means for limiting the length of time during which each successive target remains conditioned for operation, and indicating means controlled by the photosensitive member for indicating hits on the targets.

` ARCI-IIE J. MCMASTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2527326 *Apr 19, 1946Oct 24, 1950New Fred MIndicating target for simulated projectors
US2536744 *Oct 19, 1946Jan 2, 1951Raymond T MoloneyIntermittent drive with oscillating lever reset and electromagnetic release
US2670066 *May 19, 1949Feb 23, 1954Bruce Anthony R NParking meter
US2710754 *Aug 24, 1951Jun 14, 1955Rey VarneyLight actuated target apparatus
US2727136 *Nov 24, 1951Dec 13, 1955Vought Lester ATarget light adapter
US2924321 *Jun 4, 1958Feb 9, 1960Ziskind Alan ERemote control typewriter
US4333657 *Feb 8, 1980Jun 8, 1982Marvin Glass & AssociatesElectronic dart game
US5437463 *Feb 14, 1994Aug 1, 1995Fromm; Wayne G.Target game apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/52, 250/554, 194/240
International ClassificationF41G3/26, F41G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G3/2655
European ClassificationF41G3/26C1E