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Publication numberUS2241834 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1941
Filing dateApr 19, 1934
Priority dateApr 19, 1934
Publication numberUS 2241834 A, US 2241834A, US-A-2241834, US2241834 A, US2241834A
InventorsOscar W Wentz
Original AssigneeOscar W Wentz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 2241834 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 13, 1941. Q w, WENTZ 2,241,834

Filed April 19, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet. 1

INVENTOR O-Sca r- W- wen BY M ATTORNEYS May 13, 1 941.

' b. w; WENTZ 2,241,834

CONTAINER Filed April 19, 1934 5 Sheets- Sheet 2 INVENTCR Oscar W- Wen T:

BY 2 My ATTORNEY6 May 13, 1941. o. w. WENTZ 2,241,334

CONTAINER iledApril 19, 1934 5 Sheets-Shag; 3

INVENTOR Oscar N- Went:

BY $34. #XM

ATTORNEYS.

y 1941- o. W.'WIENTZ 2,241,834

CONTAINER Filed April 19, 1934. 5 sheets-sheet 4 FIG. /8

i i W55 I? I I2 INVENTOR 25) Oscar W. Wenfz I BY ATTO R N E 5.

May 13, 1941 o. w. WENTZ 2,241,334

coumnwa Filed April 19, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet '5 P1 v W;

W III Patented May 13, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CONTAINER Oscar W. Wentz, Long Island City, N. Y. Application April 19, '1934, Serial No. 721,272

14 Claims.

The invention herein disclosed involves containers preferably air tight, which are shaped up from foldable material and particularly adapted to the packaging of liquids or fine granular substances.

An object; of the invention is to produce an oil or moistureproof material having for its base paper, paste-board or other cellulosic fibre stock adaptable for folding into containers for liquids and the like. Many attempts have heretofore been made to produce oil-proof paper containers, but the results have been unsatisfactory because of the tendency of the oil-proofing materials to dry out and chip or crack off with the passage of time. Such containers have been formed usuability, or plasticity of the coating, and will not crack .or chip off when ther material is bent, folded or creased.

- requiring a minimum'of shipping sp ace.

cordance with this invention it is preferable, in one type of container, to provide a taper from I one side towards the other by making the sides A still further object of the invention is to produce an inexpensive foldable, oil-proof container especially suitable for packaging lubricating oils and other liquids.

Another important feature of the invention is the construction of the container so that it may be effectively sealed so as to withstand rough handling without leakage or damage, and is further of suitable form for packing, shipping and -handling.- I

A still further and important feature of the container is the provision of effective closing and sealing means of such form as to make the contents of the container readily available, and from which they may be easily poured through a small opening provided, into for example, the crank case of an automobile. Furthermore, the sealing means is so constructed that when the contents of the package are discharged any attempt to The construction of the container is of such a r nature that the important manufacturing operations thereon may be effected at one point and of the blank of unequal width. This provides a convenient discharge spout on the narrower I side.

These and many other objects as will be apparent from the following description, are secured by means of this invention.

This invention resides substantially in the combination, construction, arrangement and relative location of parts, all as will be described in full detail below in connection with the attached drawings and pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of one form of container in accordance with the invention;

the containers shipped partially assembled and flat to the filling point. At the filling point they are readily completely assembled by simple equip ment, filled and sealed. This permits of con- Fig. 2 is a perspective View of this container with the sealing means removed;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a modification;

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3; I

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of another modified form of container;

Fig. 6 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 66 of Fig. 5; I Fig. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the top portion of the container of Fig. 5 with a part of the sealing means displaced;

Fig. 8 is g. perspective view of still another form of container in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of this container when unsealed;

Fig. 10 is a vertical section along the line III-I 0 of Fig. 8;

I formed; I

Fig. 14 is a diagrammatic view in perspective of apparatus illustrating the several operations in the processing of the container;

Fig. 15 is a plan View of a modified form of blank from which the container oi Fig. may be formed;

Fig. 16 is a plan view of a modified form of blank from which the same container may be formed.

The preferred form of container illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, l2 and 13 will now be described. This container may be of rectangular or other suitable cross-section and constructed of a number of different materials determined by the use to which it is to be put. Where fluids such as oil or semi-fluid substances containing oil or grease are to be packaged, the material of the container may have as its base a sheet it (see Fig, 12) formed of papers, pasteboard, or other cellulosic material treated with one or more oil-proof substances. For example, a coating ii may be employed applied directly to the base sheet, and composed essentially of an oil=resistant watersoluble adhesive substance such as gum, glue, gelatin, or the like. Such materials, however, may not be separately employed alone since coatings formed therefrom dry out and become brittle, and therefore subject to chipping and cracking when the base sheet is scored, cutand creased to form the container. It is desirable, therefore, to add to the coating base glycerin in sufficient quantity to maintain the coating in a flexible and pliable condition. The coating may be kept pliable for long periods of time by adding a sufli cient quantity of glycerin or other suitable plas-' ticising agent. The pliability of the coating is important since in the normal handling of such containers they are often subjected to rough usage with the result that the coating if dry and brittle would be chipped off, exposing the base sheet to the action of the contents and introducing undesirable foreign materials into the contents.

Coatings of this nature which are permanently pliable are characterized by their sticky or tacky condition which is a result of the fact that the coating is not dry. Naturally a. sticky or tacky condition interferes with the shipment and handling of the base sheets from which the containers are formed. This difliculty must be eliminated without interfering with the ability of the coating to withstand moisture, oil, grease and the like. For this reason a second coating I2 is overlaid on the coating ii. The coating I2 may be of various compositions, and should preferably not chip off when dry, although it will not be serious if such coating should crack after drying. The important characteristic of the coating 92 is that it must not be sticky or tacky after it has dried. For this purpose a mixture of casein and glycerin is effective. Such a coating may crack after it is dry, but does not chip ed. The cracks are not objectionable masmuch as the liquid contents after passing through the crack will be repelled by the coating ii. A casein or glycerin coating will not be affected by oil and other liquids, and when dry will not interfere with the stacking of the sheets since they will not stick together.-

While it is not desired to restrict the disclosure to specific coating compositions or proportions of actress Per cent Glue 25 Sugar 15 Glycerin 50 Gelatin 30 Molasses l5 Glycerin 55 Per cent Clay 30 Casein m 45 Glycerin 25 Gelatin 30 Kaolin 50 Glycerin 20 Compositions from these ingredients will form a flexible oil-resistant coating which is not tacky when dry and will not chip-off. The addition of the kaolin to the composition acts as a filler, but too much of this should not be added.

These coatings are prepared by dissolving the ingredients in an amount of water which will impart the desired viscosity to the mixture. The coating should not be too heavy or thick as long as the more important requirement that the entire surface be well covered is met. The presence of any pin holes in the coating I I is not serious since the outer coating I2 will cover them. To reduce the possibility of pin holes the coating I I may be applied by building up several thin layers, if this precaution is desirable.

The base sheet may also be provided with a further coating to protect it against moisture. I

heat or cold. The third coating may be applied to either or both faces of the base sheet. This coating is indicated at I3 in Fig. 12 to protect the outer surface of the container. When applied to the inner surface it may be the first coating to be applied to the base sheet, or it may be applied over the coatings II and I2, depending upon the uses to which the container is to be put.

Suitable substances for this purpose are lacquer or mixtures of latex and fish glue or other suitable and well known moisture-reslstantsizing substances. A further suitable coating for this purpose comprises a mixture of 80% latex and 20% fish glue. Sodium silicate may also be employed.

A continuous strip or sheets of oil-proof board prepared as indicated above may be cut in accordance with any well known practice to produce blanks adapted to be formed into the containers of the desired shape and configuration. One form of blank is illustrated in Fig. 13, composed of the four sections 34, i5, I8 and I! defined by suitable folding lines which may be scored into the material to facilitate creasing thereof if desired. The blank illustrated in Fig. 13 provides the container of Fig. 1, except for slight variations in the scoring and the shape of the t p, as will be described below. It is generally of the same form as the blank required for the container of Fig. 8. The outer edge of section I4 is provided with an integral flap l8 which is to receive an adhesive for attaching it to the inner face of the adjacent free edge of section ll when the container is folded to shape.

' The coating substances employed in the formation of the container will not interfere with the action of the adhesive, but will as a matter of fact, assist in its action. The bottom of the container is formed by the overlapping of the extensions IS, 20, 2| and 22 of the sections l4, l5, l6 and i1 respectively. The over-laying of these extensions, as indicated in Fig. 10, will provide a bottom of triple thickness insuring a strong rugged structure.

The top edge of section I1 is provided near its center, as indicated in Figs. 8 and 9 by the dotted outline 23, with a flap which is impressed in the sheet. This outline is not indicated in Fig. 13 since this tab is not employed in the construction of Fig. 1. The sheet is not entirely out through on the outline 23,but is weakened in accordance with well known practice, so that when pressure is applied thereto it may be readily punched in to provide a discharge opening. The outline 23. may be perforated if desired, in accordance with well known practice, to permit of this use.

When the blank is properly folded the edge 24 of flap l8 will be unprotected and will be exposed to the contents of the container. Since thi is undesirable this edge is protected by the coating 25 (see Fig. 12) which may be of the composition of coating II. The coating 25 should be of such consistency that when applied it will naturally-form a thicker layer. The addition of kaolin will have this effect. By way of example, the coating may be made of a mixture of two parts of kaolin, four parts of gum, and four parts of glycerin in water. This coating is applied in such quantity as to permit a layer of it to spread over the entire bottom of the container as illustrated in Fig. 10. The coating 25 on the bottom of the container will protect the free edges of the flaps I9, 20, 2| and 22, and will furthermore impart additional strength to the bottom of the container. Likewise, this sealing coating may extend over the top 23 to prevent any possibility of the oil or other liquid in the container from attacking the paper base.

When the container is formed as described, it may then be filled with oil or any other substance which is to be dispensed therein. It is then necessary to seal the container. As a variation it may be desirable to prepare the upper end of the container for sealing before it is filled. A suitable glue or sealing substance is applied as indicated in Fig. 11 at 26, to the upper edges of the sides l5 and 11. The sealing substance may be of the same composition as the coating ll, although here again it is preferably less fluid, which is accomplished by the use of a smaller quantity of water. If desired, a latex and glue solution, or any other suitable, thick, pasty ad.-

hesive may be employed. By way of example, a mixture of four'parts of 60% latex solution and one part of ,fish glue will be suitable.

The sides l4 and I6 may be secured along the lines 21, as indicated in Fig. 13. It is to be understood that both of the sides l4 and I6 of Fig. 8 are scored in forming the container of Fig. 8. The top of the container may then be folded as clearly shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 11. When the .vided to replace the apron 49.

may then have an extension 5| adapted to fit upper ends of the sides l4 and I6 are squeezed together the adhesive coating 26 will contact all of the exposed spaces between the various walls, thereby completely sealing the container. The result is that the opening, which might otherwise be produced between the ends 28 of the infolded sides will be sealed by .an excess of the adhesive which will accumulate between these edges.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, it will be noted'that the upper end of the side l6 instead of being folded inwardly as shown in Fig. 8, is folded so as to be substantially fiat. To

accomplish this the front wall l5 and the corresponding back wall l1 are provided with the score lines 46 (see Fig. 13), while the top of the side l6 may be similarly scored as indicated at 41 to provide a slight taper to the edges of this portion. This permits the top to be folded as indicated in Fig. 1. By varying the inclination of the score lines 46 and 41 the width of the upper end of side I6 may be varied and its inclination from the vertical may also be varied. By tapering the edges 41 slightly inwardly in the manner shown the wall I6 may be made substantially vertical throughout its length, The container is. sealed by the adhesive 26 which is applied in the manner previously described. The generally T-shaped clamp 48 is then applied over the top of the container, and is secured in any one of a number of well known ways such as for example by means of indentations or apertures as shown. The head of the clip is provided with a downwardly extending apron 49, which may be grasped to open the container when lifted to the position shown in Fig. 2. The T-shaped clamp 48, being unitary or of one piece throughout, thus permits the cross or head portion, using the part 49 as a finger piece, to remain attached to the container through that portion of the T-shapedv member that connects its two Parts together, that portion being bendable from the v position of Fig. 1 to the position of Fig. 2. This flap is normally secured to the extension 41 by means of tabs 50 which are bent therearound as clearly indicated. By pulling upwardly on the flap 49 the tabs will be bent outwardly and the spout 41 may then be opened merely by pressing on the edges. thereof. The contents of the container may then be readily poured therefrom into small openings such as into the crank case of an automobile for example. To facilitate the formation of the spout the score line 5| is provided near the center of the side. It is of course apparent that both sides of the container may be given'the form illustrated in Fig. l and the metal clip will then be of substantially H-shape.

In some cases the sealing composition applied to the edges of the spout may interfere with the proper opening thereof. To prevent this a strip of suitable material may be inserted in the spout opening as it is being sealed, and this strip may then be readily withdrawn when the head of the clip is thrown back in the manner indicated. This strip may be formed of metal and replace the apron 49 of the clip, as shown in Fig. 3. The clip itself terminates along the edge 49 and a separatemetal insert 50' is pro- The insert 50 into the spout, as shown in Fig. 4. When it is desired toopen this form of container the head of the clip is simply thrown back by lifting the 4 the container of Figs. 8 and 9 will now be de- 4, actress scribed in detail. The container is sealed and closed as previously described, and the metal clip 29 is secured over the sealed edge by crimping or the indentations 38. One side of the clip is provided with an extension 3i having therein a shaped slit 32 above the outline 23. Perforations or score lines 33 are provided from the free edges of the branches of the Y-slit to the corners $35. By this arrangement the wings or flaps 35 may be readily bent back into the position indicated in Fig. 9 to expose the push-out tab 38 defined by the dotted line 23. A slight pressure against the tab 36 will force it inwardly, providing a discharge opening. As shown in Fig. 9, the wings 35 serve as guide Walls or form a channel to con.- fine the contents of the container in a limited stream as they are poured therefrom. If desired the downward extension 3i may be provided with a trough construction so arranged that it can be swung upwardly as. a single unit along a scored line or weakened section along the upper edge of the clip. By this arrangement a convenient pouring extension for pouring beyond the end of the container would be provided.

During the operation of pouring the oil or other liquid from the container, some of it flewing over the outer surface of the section it will contact with the free edge of the opening from which the tab has been pressed. This will quickly stain the base sheet thereby frustrating any attempts to use the container again.

Furthermore, any attempt to flatten out the bent wings 35 will cause them to snap ofi because of their weakening by the perforations 33 or the scoring if that is used. This construction therefore provides an efiective package which protects the original manufacturer from reuse, as well as the customer from having an inferior product foisted upon him while believing it to be of a higher quality and of difierent origin.

One of the many various ways of processing the container will now be described in connection with Fig. 14, in which is illustrated one method of applying the protective coating 25 and the sealing substance 26. After the containers are folded and secured by the adhesive as previously explained, they are placed upon a continuously moving conveyor band 3! and held in proper spaced relation thereon by means of spring clips 38. The movement of the conveyor first presents the containers for contact with a roller 39 having tapered ends, as shown, and positioned to contact the upper side edge ll of the container. The adhesive composition which is contained in the tray 42 is moved up by the roller 4|, which continuously revolves in the composition into contact with the roller 39, which revolves in contact therewith. The edge of the container scrapes the adhesive from the roller 39 and is permitted to run down the edge 24 and over the outline 23. 7

As an alternative the adhesive may be fed to the roller 39 by means of a spout 40. If desired the apparatus can be constructed to provide inward and outward movement of the roller 39 and the associated devices, so that it will contact the upper edge I! of the container only when the edge 24 and the outline 23 are in position to receive the sealing substance. Similarly the roller may be provided with a spiral surface of a pitch synchronized with the movement of the conveyor.

Further travel. of the conveyor band presents the container to a pair'of rollers 43 for applying the sealing substance 26' to the upper edges I and I1. Here againthe substance is applied to the rollers 53 through their contact with the rollers dd revolving'in a bath of the adhesive substance within the trays 65. Of course, any suitable means not shown may be employed for imparting rotation to the rollers.

Other operations can also be performed "while the container is on the conveyor 3?. For example, at later stations in the movement of the band the containers can be filled with oil or the like, or preferably can be filled at a station intermediate the two stations where the adhesive substances are applied. Still further on the advance of the band devices not disclosed can be provided for ciosing the container and applying the clips.

Another modification of the container of tzis invention is illustrated in Figs. 5, 6, l, and 16. In this form the containers may be easily nested. It is thus formed at the point of manufacture complete with the exception of sealing. In this case the bottom 52 is of less area than the crosssection along the line 53. For convenience in handling in use after the container is filled and sealed, the side 55 is formed larger than the opposite side This causes the container to not only taper outwardly from the bottom to- I wards the top, but also inwardly from the side towards the side 55. This construction provides a better pouring spout and permits a number of the containers to be conveniently mounted in a circular carrier.

One form of blank from which this modification may be constructed is illustrated in Fig. 15. The blank comprises a single piece of material in which the bottom 52 and the sides 54 and 55 are in longitudinal alignment, and are properly scored for ease in folding into the finished shape and dimensions. One of the larger walls is formed by the section 56 extending transversely from one edge of the side 54, and is reinforced by a similar flap 59 formed as a transverse extension at one edge of the side 56. The lower end of one wall of the container is further strengthened by an extension 55 of one of the edges of the bottom 52.

When the container is folded the flap 58 is preferably secured between the flaps 55 and 5? in the manner shown in Fig. 6. In a similar manner the opposite wall of the container is formed by the flaps 59, 50 and Si. The upper end of the side 54 may be formed in the same way as indicated in Fig. 8. It is preferable, however, to form this side so that it will be flush with the edge throughout its length. This is accomplished by means of the score lines 62, 63 and 64 arranged as shown in Fig. 15, in addition to the score lines 65. In forming the side the score lines 63 are forced inwardly while the edges 62, 64 and 65 remain flush with the wall 54. The upper ends of the long side walls 596l60 and 585851 are then capable of being squeezed together preferably after applying an adhesive as at 26 in Figure 11, preferably to bring the upper edge portions together along substantially a straight line.

Preferably, however, a convenient spout is formed at one end of this straight line closure ing perhaps somewhat inwardly as well as downwardly inclined, while the generally triangular panels (Figure 15) subtended between the score lines Ill-6849 merge from that downwardly and inwardly inclined edge 6969 into the planes of the upper ends of the side walls that are squeezed together, as above noted, and at their free edges these panels form a continuation of the earlier above-mentioned straight line closure.

Suitable clip meansis-preferably employed to hold the juxtaposed parts of this straight-line closure against separation and in Figure such a clip or clamping means is indicated at 66-1! and it preferably has two portions, portion 66 acting to hold together the edges of the side walls and portion H acting to hold together the edge portions of the above-mentioned triangular panels, portion 66 being, if desired, more securely held in place by means of indentations or apcrtures 61, as shown in Figure 5.

Two portions are preferably provided in such a clip or clamping means to permit release of the spout-forming portion of the closure without having to release the rest of it and suitable means are provided for releasably securing the clip portion H in place. Thus, and of course, the clips 68 and" may be formed of a single piece of material with provision made for separately bending back the portion H, thus to release the upper edges of the spout which may be spread apart for pouring purposes. Or, the clip means 86 and H may be made in two separate pieces.

But with the above described preferred form of construction of the clamp 66--1l, where thesetwo parts are formed of a single piece of material, the junction between the two, as is better shown in Figure '7, is bendable just like the junction between the two parts of the T-shaped clamp of Figs. 1-4, and hence the clip portion H may be forced out of clamping position, to release the spout-forming portions of the upper end of the container, and the parts Il may remain connected to the more securely clamped clip 68, again as indicated in Fig. 7, just as the two parts of the T-shaped clamp of Fig. 2 remain connected together.

Fig, 16 illustrates a different form of blank from which the container of Fig., 5 maybe formed. This blank approximates in form that of Fig. 13, but is formed so as to produce the double tapered effect explained above. This container comprises the main side sections 14 and I5 and the narrow and broad ends 16 and 11 respectively. A flap I8 is formed as an extension of the end 11 and may be adhesively joined to the side 14 in the assembly of the blank. The bottom is formed in the usual way by the interlocking of the flaps I9, 80, 8| and 8.2. This arrangement provides a very strong bottom construction. The upper edge is scored along the lines 83 and 85 to permit folding and closing the top of the container as previously explained in describing the construction of Fig. 5. A variation may consist of forming the upper edge of the blank so that there is a gradual upward inclination toward the pouring spout which .fa-

. cilitates pouring.

I The various forms of the invention illustrated in this case amply illustrate the adaptability of the basic principles of construction of the invention by means of which. a large number of forms in the art, with the aid of this disclosure, may make many modifications without departure from the scope of the invention.

What I seek to secure by United States Letters Patent is 1. A container comprising side walls formed of a paper stock pinched together at their upper ends to form a ,closure, and a clip for securing the pinched ends of said walls together, said clip having a portion normally concealing a discharge opening, said portion being bendable to expose said opening and to provide means for directing a fluid as it is poured through said opening.

2. A container comprising side walls formed of a paper stock pinched together at their upper ends to form a closure, a clip for securing the pinched ends of said walls together, said clip having a portion normally concealing a discharge opening, and means beneath said portion for sealing said opening, said portion being bendable to expose said opening and to provide means for directing a fluid as it is poured through said opening.

3. A container comprising a foldable blank folded and secured to form an enclosure, portions of said blank being pinched together to close said container, and clamping clip means tightly clamped to said pinched portions and clamping them together in sealing relationship, a portion of said clip means integral therewith and normally concealing a discharge opening and being readily bendable relative to the rest of said clip means to expose said discharge opening but held assembled to said container by its bendable connection to the rest of said clip means.

4. A container comprising a blank folded and secured to form a bottom and side walls, the upper ends of said walls being pinched together to form a T-shaped closure, and clip means for securing the ends of said walls together, said means having a portion over the head of said T-shaped closure readily shiftable to" provide a pouring outlet, said outlet being constructed and arranged to form a spout.

5. A container comprising a blank folded and secured to form a bottom and a plurality of flat side walls, the upper ends of said walls being pinched together to form a closure, sealing means between the abutting faces -of said walls, and

clip means for securing the abutting faces of said walls together, a portion of said clip means being readily movable to provide a pouring spout.

6. A container comprising a foldable blank folded to provide a bottom and side walls for the container, the side walls tapering outwardly from the bottom toward the top to permit nesting of similar containers, the upper ends of the'walls being pinched together to form a closure extending in the direction from the plane of one side wall toward the plane of the opposed side wall, with a portion of said closure adjacent one of said planes shaped to provide a spout, and a clip over the abutting ,edges to hold them together, that one of said two opposed side walls adjacent to which said spout is formed being narrower than the other, thereby giving said container a tapering cross-section to provide a secure gripping thereof by the fingers of the hand in effecting pouring of the contents through said spout after the latter is released by said clip and the container tilted.

7. A container comprising a foldable blank folded to provide a bottom and side walls for the container, the side walls tapering outwardly from the bottom toward the top to permit nesting of similar containers, one wall being narrower than the wall opposite it so as to produce a taper from one wall toward the other, the upper ends of the wallsbeing pinched together to form 2. closure, and a clip over the abutting edges to hold them together.

8. A container comprising side walls formed of its bendable connection with the rest of said clamping means. 1

9. A container comprising a bodyporti'on and [having a toppart scored to outline a plurality of panels for folding to close the container and including two opposed substantially quadrangular panels bendable to bring their upper end portions substantially together, thereby to give said top part a triangular cross-section, andincluding av triangular panel and panels connecting it to the adjacent lateral ends of said quadrangular panels and having their upper end portions folded into contact with parts of the upper ends of said quadrangular panels, and additional panels connecting the other adjacent side ends of said quadrangular panels and folded into closing position at their upper ends, and clamping means of sheet material of U-shaped cross-section shaped to take over the upper ends of said folded panels and to clamp and hold said upper ends together and in sealing relation to close the container, a portion of said clamping means normally concealing a discharge opening and having a relatively easily bendable connection with the remainder of said clamping means whereby said portion may be readily bent to expose said discharge opening but remain assembled to said container by its said bendable connection.

10. A container construction as claimed in claim 9 in which said discharge opening is bounded by the upper ends of certain of said folded triangular panels and when exposed by said bendable portion of said clamping means may be enlarged by unfolding the triangular panels thereof to form also a discharge spout.

11. A container construction as claimed in claim 9 in which said discharge opening is formed adjacent the end portion of one of said quadrangular panels and the portion of said clamping means that is bendable to expose said opening has its said bendable connection formed along a line such that, when being bent, said portion forms a guide for directing a liquid as it is poured through said opening.

12. A container construction as claimed in claim 9 in which said additional panels are shaped and folded so that their contacting upper end portions form a substantially straight line ex tension of the line along which said opposed quadrangular panels are closed together and form the discharge opening which is concealed by said portion of said clamping means, the bending of which exposes said discharge opening which, be cause of said additional panels, may be opened to form a discharge spout.

13. A container construction as claimed in claim 9 in which said additional panels are shaped and folded so that their contacting upper end portions form an extension at an angle to the substantially straight line along which said opposed quadrangular panels are closed together and form the discharge opening which is concealed by said portion of said clamping means, said portion extending at a substantially similar angle to the remainder of said clamping means.

14. A container formed of a paper stock and having portions folded to form a closure for the container, with sheet metal means for holding the folded portions in container-closing position, said sheet metal means having a readily bendable portion normally overlying or concealing a discharge means formed in the paper stock of the container, said discharge means being exposed upon bending said bendable portion of said sheet metal means, said discharge means comprising a portion of the paper stock of the container scored in the outline of a discharge opening and separable from the paper stock of the container along the line of scoring, upon bending said bendable portion of said sheet metal means, the latter limiting spread of fluid poured through said openmg.

OSCAR W. WENTZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2693875 *Dec 1, 1950Nov 9, 1954United Carr Fastener CorpFastener assembly
US3073503 *Nov 16, 1959Jan 15, 1963American Can CoContainer
US3217967 *Oct 7, 1963Nov 16, 1965Harold Jackson GeorgeMilk carton closure fastener
US4332344 *Feb 8, 1980Jun 1, 1982Strodthoff Glenn GResealable package
US20130186901 *Sep 22, 2011Jul 25, 2013Tetra Laval Holdings & Finance S.A.Packaging container, and blank usable in the production of such a packaging container
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/125.1, 229/103.1, 229/125.42, 229/243, 206/807, 229/125.8
International ClassificationB65D5/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/807, B65D5/069
European ClassificationB65D5/06D2