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Publication numberUS2242932 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1941
Filing dateJan 31, 1939
Priority dateJan 31, 1939
Publication numberUS 2242932 A, US 2242932A, US-A-2242932, US2242932 A, US2242932A
InventorsBreidenbaugh Christian P, Turner James F
Original AssigneeFlynn & Emrich Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice cubing machine
US 2242932 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 20, 1941 J. F. TURNER Erm. 2,242,932

ICE CUBING MACHINE Filed'Jan. 51, 1939 l 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 'i Pa' f 59 May 20, 1941- J. F. TURNER ETAL 2,242,932

ICE CUBING MACHINE Filed Jan. 3l, 1939 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 y May 20, 1941. J. F. TURNER x-:rAL 2,242,932

ICE CUBING MACHINE Filed Jan. 31, 1939 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 May 20, 1941- J. F. TURNER ETAL ICE CUBING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jan. 3l, 1939 May 20, 1941- J. F. TURNER ET AL 2,242,932

ICE CUBING MACHINE Filed Jan. 51, 1939 e sheetssheet 5 May 20, 1941 J. F. TURNER ET AL ICE CUBING MACHINE Filed Jan. 3l, 1939 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Patented May 2l), 1941 UNITE stares ICE CUBING MACHINE James F. Turner and Christian P. Breidenbaugh, Baltimore, Md., assignors to Flynn & Emrich Company, Baltimore, Md., a corporation of Maryland Application January 31, 1939, Serial No. 253,736

12 Claims.

This invention relates to a machine for cutting blocks, from relatively large bodies of material and is particularly adapted for cutting cubes of ice.

It is the object of the present invention to provide an ice cubing machine which is not only highly efficient in its operation but adapted to be constructed at a relatively small cost so that it can be sold at a price suitable to hotels, restaurants, and those who consume cubes in relatively small quantities.

This machine, like the previous machines comprises a single set of scoring saws and a single cut oi saw, the cakes being reciprocated on a single predetermined rectilinear path and turned at each end of the path. The scoring saws are intermediate of said path, the cut oif saw being at one end of said path and the loading station at the other end of the path.

While the direction of the path oi reciprocation of the cakes in the machine shown is substantially horizontal, a degree of inclination to the horizontal would not be regarded as harmful. Relatively important features of the machine of the invention are that the cake of ice or other body being cut, though it is controlled and turned by means of cage or container, referred to herein as a hopper, which encloses it laterally, is supported on a table, the hopper being open downwardly for this purpose and the hopper is turned at the ends of its stroke about an axis which eX- tends upwardly being substantially normal to the table which except as to certain phases of the invention is essentially inclined to the horizontal in a direction transverse to the path of re- Y ciprocation.

In the present machine the saw guard serves, in addition to its function in the previous machines, to support the cake after the cut off, for

this, and other purposes, it is an important fea- .f

ture of the machine, the hopper is mounted eccentrically or off center as to the axis about which it rotates so that when it is turned after the cut off operation, the cake is thrown off center and rests on the guard at the side of the saw instead of resting on the saw. This makes it possible to cut any size or shape of cake so long as it will enter the ice container or hopper.

' It is also an important novel feature of the invention that the turning of the hopper is so related to the inclination of the axis about which it turns that one corner of the hopper, preferably having the greatest radius of the hopper about said axis, is always in registration with the low side of the table. with the converging sides of the hopper at the corner and remains positioned by these converging sides, during the entire cutting operation. Preferably the handle by which the hopper is operated extends voutwardly in the direction of The cake is placed in contact CII a diagonal of the hopper through this corner.

The cake is further clamped and held against yielding by a clamp which has an automatic takeup which causes the clamp to follow the cake downwardly as it diminishes in height due to consumption of its lower end by cutting so that clainp operates until the cake is consumed. This automatic clamp serves to steady the cake and hold it in a fixed position relatively to the hopper as it passes in cutting relation with the saws and at all times. Without it the ice cake would have a tendency to yield laterally or upwardly due to the action of the scoring saws resulting in injury to the saws or insuicient and irregular scoring as to depth. 1t is also of interest that the ice container or hopper which is supported on a reciprocating carrier is so mounted on the carrier that it turns about a single'bearing at its top, the elaborate and expensive construction oi the corresponding portions of the previous machines being dispensed with, thus reducing the friction to a minimum and making it easy to operate the machine manually in the manner hereinafter described, and greatly simplifying and correspondingly reducing the cost of the present machine.

This suspension of the hopper by a single bearing at the top is important in its relation to the inclination of the axis of the hopper in a plane transverse to the path, in that it provides in a convenient manner for the eccentricity of the lhopper and thereby for holding the cake at all times in a satisfactory cutting position throughout its cycle from the time the cake is loaded until the cubing operation is completed, the cake or supply of ice in the hopper being exhausted.

While this machine is designed with a view to the operation of the carriage by hand, it may be otherwise operated, and the details of the hand operation are regarded as in themselves constituting an important feature of the invention.

As already pointed out, the hopper is turned at each end of the path and the handle is so arranged that the hopper is turned by the natural swing of the handle in reversing the stroke. Stops are provided for limiting the motion of the hopper as it turns at each end of the path and an additionals top is provided in the form of a roller which engages a track intermediate of the path, i. e. extending substantially from one turning position of the hopper to the other. The track is engaged by this roller after each turning operation thus preventing turning or partial turning of the carriage intermediately of the stroke and particularly in the portion of the path occupied by the scoring sawsV so as to prevent deflection of the cake during scoring andA consequent break-V ing of the saws or other undesired operations 01' effects. f

With these and other objects in view we have Yillustrated in the drawings a preferred form of v ure 2.

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4-4 in Figure'v 2.

Figure 5 is a sectional plan on the line 5-5 in Figure 2. Y

Figure 6 is a sectional plan on the line 6 6 in Figure V2. Both Figures 5 and 6 are taken looking downwardly. Y

Figure '7 is a fragmentary plan of the cut-off saw and guard, the table beyond the guard being broken away and the super structure, i. e., the portions over the saw'and guard being removed.

`Figure 8 is a fragmentary top planv View of the machine showing the carriage and hopper over the cut-off saw after rotating the carriage following the cut-off, the carriage being ready for the returnstroke to the left toward the scorure 5, showing a fragment of the cut-off saw in f the operation of cutting off the cubes after scoring of the cake, the shute and table being also shown fragmentarily as vwell as the lower portion of the walls of the hopper. Y

Figure 10 is aV section on the line llli0 in Figure 8, itbeingassumed that the hopper handle is in mid-position for the purposeof illustrating the latches in connection with the automatic take up clamp. `.Figure 11 is a fragmentary elevation of the upper portion of the'structure shown in Figure 10. Y

Figure112 isla horizontal section on the line I2|2 in Figur-ell, looking downwardly.

Referring'y to the drawings by numerals, each of which is yused to indicate the, same or similar parts inV theV different figures, the machine as showni comprises end frames I and 2 which are connected by a table 3 and longitudinal top structure 4, .the machine beingY closed by side plates 5 and E. It is of interest that the table 3 is inclined transversely to the direction of the length of the machine which is the directionv of the path of reciprocation of the cake. The angle of the inclination of the table lin the Y'machineshown herewithis approximately l5 to 20 degrees from the horizontal, the exact inclination not being important-` i The loading end of the machine is open at 1 for vthe admission ofthe cake in loading, the opposite end being preferably closed to prevent con- These side and end walls also confine thev snow and iine particles of ice thrown off by the scoring annd cut-off saw members. At the loading end l the machine as shown is provided with a projecting shelf 8 in line with the inclined supporting plane of the table 3, the shelf supporting surface being similarly inclined, and this shelf as shown is provided with an upright side 9 to prevent the cake from sliding or slipping from the shelf. The purpose of the shelf is to support the cakes as introduced, and to be introduced.

The shelf as shown is provided with a pivoted shield l0, the purpose of which is to prevent the snow or ice dust from the scoring saws from being projected outwardly from the machine. A large proportion of the snow dust from the cutoff saw being discharged through the snow shute Il.

The shield lil as shown projects laterally across the shelf 8 and is pivotally mounted at I2 and has a counter-balance and stopat I4. VIn operation, the shield is turned downwardly into the plane of the shelf when the calrevindicated l5 is advanced over the shelf as the cake passes into the hopper, and the shelf is slotted at Bfor this purpose. The shield is returned to upright position as shown in dotted lines by the action of the counter weight i4. rIrhe shield forms a rigid part of the shelf surface when the same has been moved downwardly as shown, due to the counter balance stop lli', stopping the downward swing of the shield at the supporting plane of the shelf 8.

The scoring saws 20 consist of a single gang of saws suitably spaced to give'cubes of the desired dimensions and these scoring saws are mounted on a single mandril 2l' which is secured to a shaft 22. This shaft 22 rotates in bearings 24 which areV stationary being secured to suitable brackets 25 at the sides of the table. The mandril 2| and shaft 22 are parallel to the supporting plane of the table 3 at right angles to the length of the table, and path of reciprocatiori'of the cake, i. e. they extend transversely Vof the table and are similarly inclined, i. e. at an angle of approximately 15 to 20 degrees to the horizontal or any suitable variation thereof. The mandril 2l and shaft 22 are preferably positioned directly beneath the table as shown, the scoring saws 2t projecting upwardly through the table by way of slots 20 into scoring relation with a cake on the table or passing along the table.

The cut-off saw indicated by reference character 25 Vis parallel to the table 3 and mounted on the upper end of the shaft of an electric motor 21 which is supported on a suitable bracket 28 on the frame of the machine as best shown in Figure 4. The axis of the motor is inclined at an angle of 15 or 20 degrees to the vertical being at right angles to the table which is similarly inclined to the horizontal. The cut-off saw 2t being mounted on the motor shaft is parallel to the table 3 and it is also spaced above the table by a predetermined distance equal to the height or depth of the cubes being cut. The cutoff saw is mounted in an opening 32 in the saw guard 29 as best shown in Figures 4, 5,7 and 9. This cut-off saw guard 2S in the iorrnof the inventionshown, vis formed integrally with the j table` 3 which is deflected upwardly at 30 as shown in Figures 2 and 7, placing the guard 29 in a plane parallel to thetable 3, and spaced above the table suiciently yto giveV the'desired height to the cubes. The guard 29 is apertured at 3l, providing a circular opening a little larger than the saw 26, the guard and the inclined portion 3U are cut away in the direction of the path of the cake, i. e. in a direction facing toward the scoring saws 20. Thus providing an opening 32 for the admission of the scored cake for and in the cut-off operation. The opening 32 is of approximately the width of the largest cake to be admitted which corresponds to the short or the narrow dimension of the hopper hereinafter described.

Figure 7 shows the saw guard 23 cut away at 33 and a plate 34 covering the opening. This is a relatively thin plate, the cut away portion corresponds to the opening 33 in Figure 4, where the ice dust from the cut-off saw is discharged. The reason for the cutaway and the thin plate, is to facilitate the discharge of the dust and to prevent it from accumulating in the vicinity of the cut-off saw 23. The scoring saws 20 and particularly the shaft 22 and the mandril 2! which carries the same, are driven by a belt 35 which drives a pulley 33 on the shaft 22 and this belt is driven from a pulley 31 on the shaft of the motor 2l, the belt 35 being deflected to the plane of the pulley 36, by means of idler pulleys 33.

The cake of ice to be cut is carried back and forth along the table 3 and presented successively to the scoring saws 2E) and the cut-off saw 28 by means of the hopper or ice container 49 which is pivotally mounted on and suspended from a carrier 4l, the carrier and hopper together composing the complete carriage 42. The carrier 4i comprises a base 43, which base 43 is provided with four rollers 44 which are mounted in pairs on two axes parallel to the transverse lines of the table, i. e., parallel to the axis of the scoring saws, each roller has a frusto conical portion 45 and a disc like flange 45. There are two of the rollers 44 on each side of the carrier, and the rollers run in horizontal tracks 41.

Each track is shown in the form of a channel iron, having its flanges 4l turned inwardly. In the form shown each pair of rollers 44 is mounted on one of two shafts 48 and the shafts 43 turn in elongated bosses 49 which extend across the top of the machine from one of each pair of rollers to the other. The said elongated bosses 43 are each provided with roller bearings 49 at their ends as shown. The spacing of rollers 44 and tracks 4'! corresponds to the width of the table and of the hopper, the latter to be further described. The shafts 48, the axes of which are the axes of rollers 44 are parallel to the transverse inclination of the table 3, or preferably so, it being understoood that the details described and presented herewith are the preferred details, however it is further understood that these details are subject to considerable variation without departure from the spirit of the invention.

The carrier is also provided with a roller 5G which is mounted to rotate about an axis parallel to the axis of the motor 2'? and at right angles to the axis of the scoring saws and the plane of the cake supporting surface of the table 3. The carrier 4! as aforesaid supports a hopper si! which depends therefrom and is pivotly mounted thereon in a manner to be hereinafter described. The roller 50 is carried and positioned on the top of the hopper 40 as shown and may be termed a stop and guide roller which cooperates with a track 5| which extends in a horizontal direction parallel to the path of the hopper and carrier structure and being limited to the center portion of the machine, and particularly in the vicinity of the scoring saws as best shown in Figure 2. This roller Eli engages the track or plate 5i as the hopper and cake approach the scoring saws and continue-s in engagement therewith until the cake carried by the hopper has passed out of scoring engagement with the said scoring saws. This stop and guide roller 53 acts in a cooperative manner with hopper stops indicated at 54 and 55, located on the top surface of the hopper 'structure 40 and serves to prevent any deflection of the cake and particularly of the hopper during scoring, deflection of the hopper and hence of the cake being regarded as tending to break the scoring saws or produce irregular and misaligned scoring, and to otherwise interfere with the desired operation of the machine. The roller 50 is shown in contact with the track 5i shown in 'broken lines in Figure 8, and the roller is also shown in similar engagement in Figure 3.

Having further reference to Figures 4 and 8, the hopper stop, i. e. the structural elements used to limit the rotative movement of the hopper 4i] to substantially 90" comprise a depending rib 52 on the carrier 43 and upright posts or other suitable stops 54 and 55 on the top of the hopper 49. The roller 53 and the track 5I cooperate with both of these stops 54 and 55 when they are respectively in Contact with the rib 52, and it may be further said that each of these stops serves to hold the carriage in one or the other of the two operative positions. These positions may be distinguished as the respective positions for scoring in two directions at right angles to each other, and it may be further said that the stop 55 engages and cooperates with the rib 52 during the cut-off operation.

The manner of mounting the hopper 40 on the base 43 of the carrier 4i will now be further considered.

The hopper 43 includes an upper or top portion 43 having a cap 51 which is shown in section in Figure l0, this cap 5l' and top portion 43 has depending flanges as shown in Figure l, to which the sides 53 of the hopper 4Q are secured, the hopper being open at the bottom and at one side, the latter for the admission of the cake; this opening as indicated at Si! in Figure 1 is partiallly closed to retain the cake by means of a gate 3l which is hinged at one side at 3l' and fastened at the other end bya hook 5I" which engages the pin 39 or other suitable engaging and releasing means.

Having particular reference to Figures l0, 11, and l2, the cap or top portion 5l' of the hopper is provided at its center with an integral upright tubular member 62. The axis of which is parallel to the axis of the cut-oli saw 25. This upright 62 extends inside of and through a corresponding tubular upright S3 which extends upwardly from the carrier 4l. This member S3 is likewise tubular and of sufiicient inside diameter to provide for the free admission of the tubular member 62, and the tubular member B2 is mounted to rotate within the tubular member 63 on the carrier by means of ball bearings G4 and 65 at the bottom and top of the carrier assembly which bearings are not only provided for rotation but to take up end and side thrust whereby the tubular member 62 and the hopper connected thereto are rotatively supported on vthe carrier 4|. The combined hopper and car- Ysame with a minimum of frictionalresistance, as

hereinafter more fully described.V The hopper is open at the bottom to permit kthe cake to rest on the table.

The tubular member 62 isshown as having a reduced cylindrical portion 67 at the top which is suitably threaded at ABlj and positioned at the said threaded top portion, to be hereinafter described in detail, is a hopper or carriage rotating handle member 68 mounted on a collar 69 which coll-ar surrounds the cylindrical portion 61 and is keyed thereto jat lt. The handle 63 and the collar 69 being held in position by a locknut or threaded collar member l.

VWhile the cake of ice is held by gravity in the corner'of the hopper which is on the low side in both angular positions of the hopper as hereinafter described, it is also held in Xed relation to said hopper and against vibration, and lifting,

and horizontal movement caused by the impact of the cake with the'scoring saws and also prevented from yielding backwardly in the cut-off operation due to its impact with the high speed cut-01T saw 26 by an ice engaging takeup clamp structure 'I3 which is part of the clamp operating assembly indicated as a whole by reference character l2. The clamp 'i3 is in the form of a claw foot, which engages the top of the ice cake l5. In the form shown, claw foot 'E3 is mounted on an upright sliding shaft 'M which is yprovided with` a rack 'l5 rigidly secured thereto being as shown mounted in a key slot 16. This rack has its teeth inclined on the downward side and flat on the top side. As the top of the cake recedes and is lowered by cutting of the cubes from the bottom ofthe cake, the clamp or clamp claw foot I3 which isV on the top of the cake recedes `and the shaft lliY slides downwardly'and is locked in each successive position by the pawl assembly 11. This Vpawl lassemblyV consists of a plurality of pawls 18 and "i9, one over the other and in sliding Contact. YThese pawls slide radially of the shaft 14 in a radial portion 8E! of thehandle 68 which is offset for this purpose and contains a plugV 8l inwhich the pawls are mounted, this plug may be held infxed rrelation to the said Y radial portion Si! of the handlev in which it is located by a set screw 8l', the said plug being hollow and open toward the shaft "M, carrying the rack 75. The pawls are advanced by means Y of springs 82 wrapped around their Shanks 83. The lower pawl 19j is controlled by aY button Btl downwardly with the cake and in constant engagement therewith.

The downward or follow-up movement of the ice engaging claw foot or take up clamp 13 is effected by gravity, due particularly to the weight of the vertical shaft member 'M to which the clamp 13 is attached. As the pawls 'I8 and 'I9 are passed by the teeth of the downwardly moving rack and bar elements 75 and M respectively, the rack toothengaging ends` of the respective pawl members move in and out of engagement with the respectively passing rack teeth until the rack member Yceases its downward movement, due to the termination of the downward Vmovement of the ice cake when one or the other of the tooth engaging pawls 18 and 'I9 coming into fixed locked engagement with the respective rack tooth in regis-tration with la pawl member locks and Xes the position of the bar M and clamp 13 against upward movement thereof. The purpose of using a double pawl assembly in the present instance is to split or divide the distance between the teeth whereby the points of pawl engagement therewith will be increased by ya ratio of two to one for a given distance between two teeth. This arrangement-also allows for the use of less teeth, whereby a heavier and more sturdy tooth may be used with a short locking throw. Thus a reliable and strong latch structure is provided to hold the cake down to its normal operating position during the scoring and cutting operations, preventing the cake from being kicked or raised upwardly by either the scoring or cut-oil saws.

This clamping element is also effective in holding the cake in Xed relation and operative position in the lowermost swinging corner of the offset or extended hopper end as hereinbeiore described. It will be fully understood that the above described follow-up and clamping function is constantly-progressive, during normal operation of the machine until the cake is exhausted. Y

At the lower end of the rack iti, see Figures 1G, 11, and V1:2 of the drawings, there is a projecting key like portion 3l. In this connection Y itmay be noted that Vthe upper portion of the mounted on its shank 83 as shown. VBy means of this Vbutton Ythe pawl may be withdrawn when desired. The two pawls are interconnected by a pin 35 in the lower pawl member. 'The upper 'exposed portion of this 'pin engages in a short 'the pawl 18, thus enabling both-the said" pawls Y to be fully disengaged from the teeth of the rack 'l5V in a simultaneousY manner, thereby releasing Further the shaft l, and permitting it to be drawn upwardly, As theV top of thecake moves downwardly due to the cut-off operations on the bot- -torn of the cake, the top of the cake Supports the Clawfoot 13, thus allowing the same to move tubular upright $2 at 67 provides a bearing 88 for the sliding of the shaft it, this bearing portion is slotted at 8S' for the passage of the rack l5 and key member 3i. A fur-her function of whichV is to support the shaft 'it and its claw foot or clamp i3 in withdrawn or in operative. position when it is desired toinsert a new cake. In this respect raising the shaft 'lli to the position in Figures 11 and l2 and then partially rotating the shaft lllA as shown, the key $1 is thrown out ofl registration with the slot so thatV it engages the top of thecylind'rical portion 5i of the upper end of the tubular member B2.

IThis with holding of the claw foot member and Y shaft ifi inV this manner prevents injury to the handby dropping of the claw foot Vclamp member 'F3 and when the new cake has been inserted the shaft 'i3 may be rotated tov bring the key member 5l into registration with theslot 35i which permits the claw foot 'E3 and the shaft Fit toY move downwardly, the clamping member of claw foot 'i3 then engages the new cake and' in engaged position with the cake will be locked Yby the pawls 78 and'll. YA transverse pin 'i3' Yprojecting from the topY of the shaft 'ilprevents the claw from contacting the table.

Referring now to Figures 4 and 9, it is of in- `terest that a sheet metal shute is provided bcneath the cut-off saw 26 whereby the cubes are discharged into any suitable container positioned as shown. The shute being indicated by reference character 96, the shute as shown is inclined downwardly toward the low side of the machine by an angle exceeding that of the table. It is also of interest that a deflecting plate or disc QI is lprovided overlying the pulley 3l and concentric with the cut-off saw arbor, this plate 9| protects the motor bearings from the ice dust discharged by the saw and likewise prevents the cakes from being drawn in between the pulley 31 and belt 35, whereby the belt might be dislodged from the pulley. 'There is also, as already pointed out, an aperture 33 for discharging the ice dust from around the saw 26. An additional ice dust dispel-sing opening I I is provided in the end wall of the machine at the termination of the cut-oi saw guard to prevent accumulation of ice dust on the top of the said guard in this zone of operation. This opening may be provided with a chute II as shown to deflect the ice dust in a downward direction.

A feature of primary importance in the control of the cake is that the hopper 4D is oif center as to the axis of the bearings 64 and 65 of the carrier assembly 4I, see particularly for said bearings Figures 5 and 6, and 10 of the drawings. The hopper is shown as rectangular in shape as to its cross section in a plane parallel to the table and of somewhat greater dimension IBG in a direction at right angles to the gate 6I when closed and at right angles to the plane of the opening 6U, its short dimension Iiii being in the direction of the width of this opening 6I] and in the direction of the length or radius of the gate 6I when closed. The axis of said bearings 64 and 65, while it is in the center of the short dimension, is unequally spaced as to the long dimension I, i. e., in the position shown in Figure 5, the gate 6I and the opening 6I) are nearer to the axis of bearings 64 and 65 than is the other end of the hopper at 6i. This eccentric-ity is of particular advantage in that the hopper 4B as it moves toward the cut off saw has its long dimension |80 disposed in the direction of reciprocation, i. e., in the direction of the length of the table and when the carriage is rotated, after the cut-oif, the eccentricity of the carriage throws the long end 5 l of the hopper down the incline and throws the cake off center causing the cake to be transferred from the saw 26 on to the guard 29. The hopper having been turned by means of handle 68 to the full line position of the latter in Figure 8 and to the position of the hopper in that iigure, the long dimension ISG being transverse to the table, the hopper is ready for the next stroke, i. e., to be returned over the scoring saws. The cut-01T saw is shown slightly below the upper surface of the guard, and while the cake overhangs the saw, its weight is thus supported on the guard and removed from the saw as shown in Figure 8, and in the advance of the carriage toward the scoring saws the weight of the cake is carried by the guard until the cake passes the cut-off saw and has advanced to the supporting surface of the table 3.

In Figure 5 the low side of the machine is at the top of the figure as it is likewise in Figures 6 and 8. In rotating as above described, the hopper moves from the position Figure 5 to the position Figure 8, and the back 6I' of the hopper in rotating moves or rotates or swings down the incline to the lowest position, Figure 8, and

in the next angular motion of the carriage at the other end of the stroke, the side 6I moves back to the relative position it occupies in Figure 6, so that by gravity the cake I5, even if it be smaller than the hopper or container 40, remains in contact with the sides which converge at the corner IUI. Incidentally, when the cake is introduced or loaded, it is pushed into the back of the hopper into contact with the back side 6I and the side |62 being on the low side of the incline, it contacts this side and thus is seated in the corner IDI. When the lock 'I2 is released by releasing the key 81 as before described, the claw foot 'I3 descends and becomes fixedly engaged with the top of the cake by means of its pointed ends as shown. Both gravity and the clamp contribute to the holding of the cake in this position. For the sides of the hopper converging at II, any converging positioning members may be substituted.

In the operation of the machine, the hopper 40 is rst moved to the position in which it is shown in Figure 6. A cake of ice I5 is then placed on the shelf B causing the shield I0 to swing down into the slot in the shelf as already described and the gate 6I having been thrown open, the cake is advanced into the hopper as shown. The gate being then closed, the clamp assembly 'I2 having been previously raised and checked in uppermost positio-n to prevent injury to the hand, it is released and permitted to descend bringing the foot 13 into engagement with the cake. The toothed rack 'I5 is then engaged by the pawls 'I8 and 19, and the claw foot 'I3 is held in engagement with the top of the cake as hereinbefore described and as best shown in Figures 1 and 4. The hopper is now in the position Figure 6.

The operator normally stands at the low side of the machine and grasps the handle with his right hand. Assuming that he is right handed; in starting after the introduction of a new cake, the machine may be manipulated in any suitable :manner to give two sets of scores at right angles to each other or the machine may be operated to cut the bottom of the cake which is rst scored in a plurality of strips. In the loading position Figure 6, the handle extends northeasterly (i. e. in the direction of a radius of the hopper through corner IUI). If it is desired to score the bottom of the cake at right angles so as to cut cubes in the first operation of the cut-off saw, it may be lbest to rst rotate the hopper 40 by moving the handle 68 to the left turning the hopper 4I) and the cake I5 to a position at right angles to the position in which it is shown in Figure 6. The hopper with the cake projecting downwardly' on to the table, it being understood that the bottom of the hopper is open and spaced above the table suiiciently to clear the scoring saws as shown, may then be advanced over the scoring saws cut- -ting a set of scores I5 in the direction relatively to the cake and hopper in which they are shown in Figure 6. The hopper and cake would then be returned over the scoring saws passing them through the same scores without turning. The hopper would be then turned moving the handle to the right and Ithe hopper to the position Figure 6 and the hopper and cake would be advanced over the scoring saws cutting a second set of scores at right angles to the set shown in Figure 6. The handle being inclined forwardly, as best shown in Figure 1 and in ne dotted lines in Figure 8, the carriage and cake would then be advanced beyond the scoring saws and over the cutoi saw 26, and the projecting scored portions of the cake indicated as l" in Figure 9 wouldbe severed as illustrated in said igure and would pass down the shute. At this time the long dimension lili) of the hopper d would be disposed in the direction of transverse or reciprocation which is the direction of the length of the table, the handle B8 would be in the dotted line position in Figure 8, i. e. inclined in the direction of the motion which has taken place. After the cut-oilF operation, the handle d8 would be moved to the left in Figure 8 tothe full line position therein shown and the hopper would be rotated eccentrically swinging its long dimension ld@ transversely to the direction of reciprocatio-n and the length of the table so that the back side 6i', see Figures 5 and 8, would be moved to the low point, i. e. down the incline to the low side of the machine or particularly to the side of the table that is remote from the observer in Figures 5, 6, and 8. which is the low side. This movement of the back side 6l of the hopper not only serves to retain the cake in the corner indicated by mi in Figure 5 of the hopper, which Vis always cnvthe low side of the table, but it will move the cake so that its weight rests on the low side of the guard. -While the cake extends over the cut-off saw, its weight will be shifted from the cut-off saw. As the cake moves backrtoward the scoring saws, the handle l*being inclined in the direction of the scoring saws, is in position to advance the hopper and carry it and the Ycake therein toward the saws for the neXt scoring operation, and when the cake reaches the opposite or loading end of the machine as already indicated, the handle 68 will then be swung to the right, i. e., in the direction of the next motion, and the carriage and hopper with the cake therein will again be moved over the scoring saws and a second score at right angles tothe one rst made will be formed. The cake then being further advanced the scored portion will enter the table siot 32 which corresponds to the narrow width of the hopper, and will come in contact with the cut-off saw 2B, whereby the scored cubes will be severed, as already described and as illustrated in Figure 9, and passed down the chute Sil It is of importance in the yoperation described to note that stops 5K3 and' 55 on the top of the hopper cooperate with the depending rib 52 on the carrier, the hopper being moved from one contacting position to the other in the angular motion mentioned, and that the roller 5B is so placed in relation to the track 5i that in each angular position of the hopper when it is moved over the scoring saws the roller 56 contacts the track 5I and cooperates with corresponding stop 5d and 55 and rib 52, preventing deflection of the hopper and hence of the cakerfrom the intended path which is a direct linear path, carrying it over the scoring saws. Deilection, as already pointed out, would tend to bend or break the saws and interfere with the desired operation of the machine., Y Y

The advantages of this invention are convenience and increased utility with great simplicity and consequently small cost, and numerous advantages of construction andy arrangement have *been fullydiscussed in the preamble and in connection with the drawings.

The inventionhas also been described specically and in'detail so that the manner of constructing, applying; 'operating and using the invention may be fully-understood; however, the specific terms" herein Lare used in a descriptive rather than in av limiting sense, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a machine for cutting bodies of material into uniform blocks, a carrier mounted 'to reciprocate on a single rectilinear path, a hopper rotatively mounted thereon and depending therefrom, a table beneath the hopper and substantially parallel to said path, the axis of the hopper being normal to the'table and the table being inclined transversely to the path of re ciprocation, a cut oif saw and scoring saws in operative relation to said path and means for limiting the turning of the hopper to positions in which one portion of the hopper, having converging sides to position the body being cut, is always on the low side ci' the incline, the cut olf saw being at one end of the path and having a guard to support the cake after the cut oif, the axis of the hopper being eccentric and the said portion of the hopper having converging sides which is` always on the low sideof the inoline being of relatively great radius as compared to other portions of the hopper.

2. In a machine for cutting bodies of material'into uniform blocks, a carrier mounted to reciprocate on a single rectinlinear path, a hopper rotatively mounted thereon and depending therefrom, a table beneath .the hopper and substantially parallel to said path, the axis of the ,hopper being normal to the table and the table being inclined transversely to the path of reciprocation, a cut off saw and scoring saws in operative relation to said path and means for limiting the turning of the hopper to positions in which one portion of the hopper, having converging walls to position the body being cut, is always on the low side of the incline, the cut off saw being at one end of the path and having a guard to support the cake after the cutl oi, the axis of the hopper being eccentric and the ,said portion of the hopper havingk lconverging sides which is always on the low side of the in- Cline being of relatively great radius as compared to the other portions of the hopper, and

means in continuous engagement during cutting with the top of the body being cut to assist in holding said body in the position determined by Said converging sides, said latter holding means having ratchet teeth and a pair of alternately operating pawls Vto lock the holding means inV closely related positions to prevent lifting of the body Iby Ithe saws.

3. In a machine for cutting bodies of material into uniform blocks, a carrier inounted'to reciprocate on a single rectilinear path,` a hopper rotatively mounted thereon and depending therefrom, a table beneath the hopper and substantially parallel to 'said path, the axis of the hopper being normal to the table and the table being inclined transversely to the path of reciprocation, a cut oi saw and scoring saws in operative relation to said path and means 'for' limiting the turning of the hopper to positions in which one portion of the hopper, having converging sides to position the body being cut, is always on the low side of the incline, the Vmeans for rotatively supporting the hopper on the carrier comprising a single rotary and thrust bearing and a shaft to which the hopper is secured rotatively supported in said bearing, said shaft being hollow and having a clamping shaft slidably mounted in said hollow, said clamping shaft having, on its lower end, a foot for engaging' the top of the body being out to hold the latter in cutting position.

4. In a machine for cutting bodies of ice or other materials into relatively small uniform blocks, a carrier mounted for recip-rocation on a predetermined path, a hopper rotatively mounted on the carrier and open at .the bottom, a table spaced downwardly from the hopper to support bodies in the said hopper, the table being beneath the said hopper and substantially parallel to said path, a cut off saw in the path of the bodies in the hopper, scoring saws adjacent said path and parallel to the same and projecting through the plane of the table into said path, means for reciprocating the carrier and hopper along said path and turning the hopper through equal and opposite angles at the ends of the path, and means moving with the carrier for` holding the bodies .to be cut in said hopper preventing lateral and upward motion of said body relatively to said hopper, comprising a shaft extending downwardly into the hopper in line with the axis of said hopper, the same being mounted to slide freely in the direction of said axis and having an engaging foot adapted to engage and to be supported on the top of the body being cut and having automatic locking means for holding the shaft against upward motion in each position of rest of said foot as the top of the body recedes downwardly in correspondence with the consumption of the body by the operation of said saws.

5. In a machine for cutting bodies of ice or other materials into relatively small uniform blocks, a carrier mounted for reciprooation on a predetermined path, a hopper rotatively mounted on the carrier and open at the bottom, a table spaced downwardly from the hopper to support bodies in the said hopper, the table being beneath the said hopper and substantially parallel to said path and the axis of rotation of the hopper being normal to said table and upwardly disposed, a lcut off saw in the path of the bodies in the hopper, scoring saws adjacent said path and projecting through the plane of the table into said path, means for reciprocating the carrier and the hopper along said path and turning the hopper at the ends of the path, and means for holding the bodies to be cut in sai-d hopper preventing lateral and upward motion of said bodies relatively to said hopper, said holding means being mounted to slide freely in a direction normal to the table and having a foot for engaging the top of the body being cut and means for applying continuous downward pressure to said foot causing it to move downwardly and to continue in engagement with the top of said body as said top recedes downwardly in correspondence with the consumption of said body by said saws, and automatic locking means for holding said engaging means against upward motion, in a series `of closely related positions arranged in said direction normal to the table.

6. In a machine for cutting blocks from bodies of ice or similar material, a carrier mounted to reciprocate on a predetermined rectilinear path, a hopper mounted on said carrier to rotate relatively thereto and open at the bottom, a table beneath said hopper and parallel to said path, said table having a supporting surface for the body of the material in said hopper which surface is inclined to the horizontal in a direction transverse to said path, a gang of scoring saws projecting through the plane of the table into the path of a body carried by the hopper resting on the table, a cut off saw parallel to the table and spaced abo-ve the same the desired height of the blocks to be cut and means for reciprocating the hopper and turning it about an upwardly disposed axis normal to the table at each end of its path, a saw guard adjacent the cut off saw and slightly above the same, the guard extending along the low side of said saw, thehopper being eccentrically pivoted, means for controlling the turning of the hopper and limiting said turning to positions in which a portion of the hopper of the greatest radius is on the low side of the inclined table and below the hopper axis, said portion having converging members for positioning the cake, and a handle for operating the hopper and carrier, the handle being connected to lthe hopper to turn the same projecting in the general direction of a radius of the hopper at said portion of greatest radius.

'7. In .a machine for cutting blocks from bodies of ice or similar mat-erial, a carrier mounted to reciprocate on a predetermined rectilinear path, a hopper mounted on said carrier to rotate re1- atively thereto and open at the bottom, a table beneath said hopper and parallel to said path which is substantially horizontal, said table having a supporting surface for the body of the material which is inclined to the horizontal in a direction transverse of said path, the anis of the hopper being normal to the said surface, a gang of scoring saws spaced in accordance with the desi-red dimensions of the blocks projecting through the plane of the table into the path of a body carried by the hopper, a cut off saw in the path of the bodies in said lhopper at one end of said path and parallel to the table and spaced above the same the desired height of the blocks to be cut, and means for reciprocating the hopper and turning it at each end o-f its path, the hopper being eccentrically pivoted and having portions of different radii and stops limiting the arc of turning of the hopper to positions in which a portion of the hopper of greatest radius, and having converging lateral members to position 'the cake, is over the low side of the inclined table, whereby the bodybeing cut is given a tendency to remain in one -position in the hopper and in contact with the projecting portion of the hopper of greatest radius without regard to the size of the body.

8. In a machine for cutting blocks from bodies of ice or similar material, a carrier mounted to reciproca-te on a predetermined rectilinear path, a hopper mounted on said carrier to rotate re1- atively thereto and open at th-e bottom, a table beneath said hopper and parallel to said path which is substantially horizontal, said table having a supporting surface for the bodies of rmaterial being cut which surface is inclined to the horizontal in a direction 'transverse of said path, the axis of the hopper beingsecured to the table, a gang of scoring saws spaced in accordance with the desired dimensions of the blocks projecting through th-e plane of the table into the path of a body carried by the hopper and resting on the table, a cut voff saw in the path of the bodies in said hopper at one end of said path the .same being parallel to the table and spaced above the `same by the desired height of the blocks and means for reciprocating the hopper and turning it at eac-h end of its path, the hopper being eccentrically pivoted and having portions of different radii, and stops limiting the arc of turning of the hopper to posit-ions in which a portion of the hopper of greatest radius is. over the low side of vthe inclined table, said portion having converging late-ral members for positioning said body being cut, whereby the body being cut is given a Itendency to remainin one position in `the hopper and in Contact with the said positioning members without regardto the size of the body, and other means bearing downwardly continuously during the cuttingoperation on the body being cut to hold it in said position, and automatic locking means continuously operative Vduring cutting to prevent yieldin'g of said holding means,

9. In a machine for cutting bodies of material `into relatively small blocks, a carrier mounted to reciprocate von a predetermined rectilinear path, a hopper rotatively mounted on the carrier and open at the bottom, a table beneath the hopper and adapted to support a body to be out carried in the hopper, the table being substantially par-allel to said path and being inclined from the horizontal in a direction transverse to said path, v

Vthe Vside of the cut oi saw adjacent the low side of the table, means for reciprocating the carrier along said path and turning the hopper about its axis of rotation which is normal to the table at the ends of said path, the hopper being eccentrically pivoted providing a portion of relatively long radius adapted to hold and position the body to be cut and stops limiting the turning of the hopper to positions in which the portionV of the hopper having the long radius `is maintained over the low side ci Ithe table, whereby the body of th-e material b-eing cut is removed from the out oi saw by the turning operation immediately after the eut oir, and transferred to the guard support. Y

l0. In a machine for cutting bodies of material into relatively small blocks, a carrier mounted to reciprocate'on a predetermined path, a hopper rotatively mounted on the carrier and open at the bottom, a table beneath the hopper and adapted to support a body to be cut carried in the hopper, the table being substantially parallel to said path and being inclined to the horizontal in a direction transverse to said path and the axis of rotation being substantially normal to the table, scoring saws intermediate of said path projecting upwardly through the plane of said table into the path of a body in said hopper, a cut off saw at one end of said path substantially parallel to the table spaced above the table a distance corresponding to the height of the block to be cut, a support for the body being cut at the side ofthe out off saw corresponding to the low side of the table, means for Yreciprocating the carrier tions in which a portion of the hopper having the longest radiusis maintained over the low side of the table said long radius of the low side of the hopper and the angle of turning between .said stops being sufficient to provide for the transfer of the body of the material being cut which is held by gravity in the long radius portionof the hopper, from the cut off saw to said support by the turning operation immediately after the cut off, andan additional means operating intermediately of the path to prevent turning of the hopper while it is passing the cut off saw.

11. In a machine for cutting blocks from bodies of ice and similar materials, a carrier, means for reciprocating the Ycarrier on a predetermined path, a hopper mounted on the carrier to turn through predetermined angles about an upwardly extending axis, the hopper being open at the bottom, a table beneath the hopper and adapted to l Vsupport a body carried therein, the table being substantially parallel to said path and inclined to the horizontal in a direction transverse to said path, scoring saws projecting through the plane of the table into the path of a body in the hopper;

a cut off saw also in the path of the body in the hopper and substantially adjacent to one end of said path, the cross' section of the hopper parallel to the table being oblong, said axis being substantially in the center of the short dimension and off center as to the long dimension of said cross section of the hopper said cross section thus having two corners near the axis and two corners relatively remote from said axis, and stopping means for limiting the rotation of the hopper to positions in which one of said remote corners is on the low side of the incline.

12. In a machine for cutting blocks from bodies of ice and similar materials, a carrier, means for reciprocating the carrier on a single predetermined path, a hopper mounted on the carrier to rotate about an upwardly extending axis and open at the bottom, a table beneath the hopper and adapted to support a body carried therein, the table being substantially parallel to said path said axis being inclined to the vertical in a direction transverse to said path, scoring saws projecting upwardly into the path of the body in the hopper, a cut off saw at right angles to said axis and inclined to the horizontal and in the path of the body in the hopper and substantially adjacent to one end of said path, a support for the body being out, the support being adjacent the low side of the cut-off saw and slightly above the plane of said saw and the cross section of the hopper parallel to the cut-off -saw being oblong, said axis being substantially vin the center of the short dimension and o center as to the long dimension of said cross section, the hopper thus having two corners near its axis and two corners relatively remote from said axis, and stopping means for limiting the rotations of the hopper to positions in all of which one of said remote cor-V ners is on the low side of the incline, and a handle for said hopper whereby it is reciprocated, and turned at each end of its path, said handle projecting in the general direction of the diagonal at said low corner the long dimension of the said hopper section being parallel to the path as the hopper approaches the cut-oi saw, the turning of theV hopper after the cut-off serving to transfer the weight of the body from the cutoi saw to the support.

JAMES F. TURNER. CHRISTIAN P. BREIDE-NBAUGH.'

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2949138 *Sep 25, 1958Aug 16, 1960Edgerton Card CalebTimber handling apparatus for resawing mills
US3033067 *Nov 7, 1956May 8, 1962Miehle Goss Dexter IncWork holding and conveying means for automatic cutter
US4483226 *Sep 22, 1982Nov 20, 1984Edoardo CostarelliMachine for shearing films of thermoplastic material
US5189939 *Dec 23, 1991Mar 2, 1993Carbonic Reserves, Inc.Apparatus for cutting blocks of ice
US7726221 *Jun 6, 2006Jun 1, 2010Edward TwegFood dicer
EP0252056A2 *May 26, 1987Jan 7, 1988James Paul DelbekeMethod and apparatus for making a cut in a piece of wood
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/878, 83/425.3, 83/404.2, 83/915.3
International ClassificationB23D45/10, F25C5/00, F25C5/14, B23D45/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25C5/14, B23D45/102
European ClassificationB23D45/10B, F25C5/14