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Publication numberUS2243222 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1941
Filing dateSep 30, 1940
Priority dateSep 30, 1940
Publication numberUS 2243222 A, US 2243222A, US-A-2243222, US2243222 A, US2243222A
InventorsRebholz Elmer F
Original AssigneeJames F Barnes, Jean O Reinecke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cornice
US 2243222 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

CORNICE Jig a E. F. REBHOLZ Filed Sept. 30, 1940 h Zf@j May 27, 194 1.

Patented May 27,1941

COBNICE Elmer F. Rebholz, Chicago, Ill., assignor of onethird to James F. Barnes and one-third to Jean 0. Reinecke Application September 30,1940, Serial No. 358,985

9 Claims.

This invention relates to a cornice, and more particularly to a window cornice of variable or adjustable depth.

An object of the invention is to provide a window cornice which may be arranged to extend any desired distance from the window frame. Another object is to provide a window cornice which may be used with any width of window. Still another object is to construct a cornice bracket which may be readily and easily packaged and handled. Yet another object is to provide in a window cornice a cornice board and supporting brackets therefor cooperatively arrangedwith the board to present an attractive appearance. A further object is to provide a substantially flat cornice bracket bendable at spaced portions along the longitudinal sides thereof. Still another-object is to provide in a cornice bracket longitudinal channels for slidably receiving a cornice board, which channels do not interfere with the bending of the bracket.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the following specification and drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my improved window cornice in position on a window frame; Fig. 2 is a plan view of the cornice bracket blank; Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a corner member; Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line P4 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken along the line 55 of Fig. 4.

As is well known, window cornices are used with windows of widely varying width and also arranged to extend different distances from the window frame. By this invention, a simple cornice construction is provided which is adapted for use with different sized windows and adapted to provide a cornice of variable depth.

Broadly, the cornice construction includes a cornice board and a pair of brackets supporting the board. The board may be of any suitable length, depending upon the width of the window, while the brackets may be arranged to provide the desired depth for the cornice.

In the specific embodiment of the invention described herein, a pair of brackets I and II are mounted on a window frame l2 and support between them a cornice board l3.

As seen particularly in Fig. 2, the blank from which the bracket I0 is formed may be a flat, flexible, inelastic, metallic strip I4, the strip being preferably composed of a soft bendable metal such as steel or a suitable alloy. If desired, other bendable materials may be used in place of the metal.

To the strip or body M of the bracket II! are integrally secured a plurality of lugs l extending from the longitudinal sides It and I! of the strip II. The lugs are spaced apart along the sides of the strip. The lugs 15 may be made of the same material as the body of the bracket, and, if desired, may be continuous therewith as shown. If this construction is used, the bracket blank, including the lugs, may readily be formed by merely stamping it from a suitable sheet of material.

An extension I8 is secured to one end of the strip H, the extension being provided with apertures l9 and 20 and slots 2| and 22izommunicating therewith. As seen particularly in Fig. 4, the extension l8 may readily be right angularly bent with respect to the body of the bracket to form a lateral flange 23. It is by means of this flange 23 that the bracket may be mounted upon a wall or window frame.

The lugs l5, being of soft material and readily bent, are turned inwardly to form longitudinal channels (Fig. 1) on the strip It. The lugs may, of course, be turned inwardly towards either side of the strip It.

The surface of the strip I4 .is preferably provided with a plurality of transverse scores 26 extending across the strip at each of the longitudinal portions thereof between the lugs IS The scores 26 may consist of small grooves cut in the surface of the strip l4, and are preferably of sufficient depth to facilitate bending of the strip along the score lines.

The strip 14 may thus be bent transversely at any of the spaced longitudinal portions between the lugs l5. Preferably it is right angularly bent to form an end support 24 and a side portion 25.

The cornice board I3 may be of any desired composition or character. The board is usually made from wood or composition material such as that sold under the trade name Masonite. It may, if desired, be painted, and may bear upon its face any suitable design (not shown) to increase the attractiveness of its appearance.

The opposite ends of the cornice board I3 are received within the longitudinal channels of the brackets l0 and H, the board preferably being inserted into the bracket before the cornice is mounted on the window frame. The length of the cornice board will, of course, depend upon the width ofthe window to which the cornice is to be applied.

When the cornice is being assembled, the window may be measured and the board cut to the proper length. End boards 29 of material similar to that of the cornice board l3 may be'slidably inserted into the channels of the end supports 24.

A corner member 30 of metal or other suitable material may be provided to cover the space between the cornice board l3 and the end boards 29. The corner member preferably comprises .a rounded body 3| and flanges 32 and 33 right angularly disposed with respect to each other, the flanges 32 and 33 being adapted to be received within the channels of the end supports 24 and side portion 25 of the brackets l and II beneath the cornice board It and end board 29.

The cornice assembly is mounted on the window frame by securing the flanges 23 of the brackets in and II to the headed screws 21 and 28 in the frame, the screws being received within the slots 2| and 22 to anchor the cornice in position.

The bracket It may be constructed in the form of an entirely flat member or with the extension I! and the lugs l5 bent as heretofore described. In either event, the bracket is easily packaged and handled, and occupies but little space.

The cornice board l3 may be made in the proper length for the window to which the cornice is to be applied, or, if desired, may be made of a length greater than the width of any window with which it is expected to be used. In the latter case, when the cornice is to be assembled, the board must be cut to the proper length.

In assembling the cornice, the brackets l0 and H are first prepared for use, the extensions l8 being bent to form lateral flanges 23, and the lugs l5 being turned in to form the longitudinal channels in the brackets. The depth of the cornice desired is then determined, and the bracket bent along the line of the appropriate score 26. The width of the window is measured and the cornice board cut to proper length. The corner member 30, the cornice board l3, and the end boards 29 are then inserted in the channels in the brackets in and II in the manner shown in Fig. 1.

The cornice is thus completely assembled, and may be secured to the window frame by mounting the flanges 23 thereon. v

The window cornice which is thus produced is extremely attractive in appearance, since the lugs l5, which retain the boards in position, provide a fluted appearance at the corners. The cornice board, bearing a suitable design, adds to the attractiveness.v At the same time, the structure is extremely simple in both construction and assembly.

While there are shown and described certain embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed in the appended claims, in which it is intended to claim all novelty inherent in the invention as broadly as permissible, in view of the prior art.

I claim:

1. A cornice of the character described comprising a cornice board, and a pair of brackets for slidably supporting said board, said brackets being bendable transversely at spaced longitudinal portions thereof to provide a cornice of variable depth. I

2. A cornice of the character described comprising a cornice board, and a pair of brackets equipped with longitudinal channels for slidably supporting said board, said brackets being bendable transversely at spaced. longitudinal portions thereof to provide end supports of variable depth for said cornice.

3. A cornice of the character described comprising a cornice board, and a pair of flat, flexible, inelastic, metallic strips equipped along the longitudinal sdes thereof with a plurality of spaced lugs extending therefrom, said lugs being turned inwardly to form channels for slidably receiving said board, said strips being right angularly bendable at the spaced portions thereof between said lugs to provide end supports for said cornice.

4. A cornice of the character described comprising a cornice board, a pair of flat, flexible, inelastic, metallic strips equipped along the longitudinal sides thereof with a plurality of spaced lugs extending therefrom, said lugs being turned inwardly to form channels for slidably receiving said board, said strips being transversely scored at the spaced portions thereof between said lugs and being bendable along the score lines to provide end supports for said cornice, and means adjacent the ends of said strips for mounting the same on a wall.

. 5. A cornice of the character described comprising a cornice board, a pair of flat, flexible, inelastic, metallic strips equipped along substantially the entire length of each of the longitudinal sides thereof with a plurality of spaced lugs extending therefrom, said lugs being turned inwardly to form channels for slidably receiving said board, said strips being transversely scored at the spaced portions thereof between said lugs and being right angularly bent along one of said score lines to provide end supports for said cor-' nice, lateral flanges on said end supports for mounting the same on a wall, a pair of end boards slidably carried by the inwardly turned lugs on said end supports, and a pair of corner members mounted on said strips between the ends of said cornice board and said end boards.

6. A variable depth cornice bracket comprising a soft, flat, bendable metallic strip equipped with longitudinal channels thereon, and means on said bracket for mounting the same on a wall.

7. A variable depth cornice bracket comprising a fiat, flexible, inelastic body, and a plurality of spaced lugs secured to said body along at least one of the longitudinal sides thereof, said lugs being turned inwardly to form a channel for slidably receiving a cornice board, said body being bendable along a transverse axis through any of the longitudinal portions thereof between said lugs.

8. A variable depth cornice bracket comprising a flat, flexible, inelastic, metallic body, and a plurality of spaced lugs integrally secured to said body along the longitudinal sides thereof, said lugs being turned inwardly to form longitudinal channels for slidably receiving a cornice board, said body being bendable along a transverse axis through any of the longitudinal portions thereof between said lugs.

9. A variable depth cornice bracket comprising a flat, flexible, inelastic, metallic strip equipped along substantially the entire length of each of the longitudinal sides thereof with a plurality of spaced lugs extending therefrom, said lugs being turned inwardly to form channels for slidably receiving a cornice board, said strip being transversely scored at the portions thereof between said lugs and being right angularly bent along one of said score lines to provide end supports for said bracket, and a lateral flange on said end support for mounting the same on a wall.

ELMER F. REBHOLZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2638162 *Jul 8, 1948May 12, 1953Heitlinger Eugene VWindow cornice and support
US4966218 *Oct 30, 1989Oct 30, 1990Peters Margaret AWindow cornice and method for hanging curtains
US5062463 *Aug 6, 1990Nov 5, 1991Peters Margaret AWindow cornice and method for hanging curtains
US5484006 *Aug 1, 1994Jan 16, 1996Walker; Whitney A.Cornice box
US5503209 *May 9, 1994Apr 2, 1996Repcon International, Inc.Window valance kit
US5597025 *Feb 14, 1995Jan 28, 1997Forkner; Sharon A.Sectioned window cornice
US5890527 *Feb 11, 1998Apr 6, 1999Springs Window Fashions Division, Inc.Window cornice assembly
US5927362 *Feb 11, 1998Jul 27, 1999Springs Window Fashions Divisions, Inc.Window cornice assembly
US8439590 *Aug 26, 2009May 14, 2013A. Raymond et CieKnuckle protector for a vehicle
US20110262211 *Aug 26, 2009Oct 27, 2011A. Raymond Et CieKnuckle protector for a vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/38, D25/55, 248/300
International ClassificationA47H2/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47H2/00
European ClassificationA47H2/00