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Publication numberUS2244030 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 3, 1941
Filing dateMar 3, 1939
Priority dateMar 3, 1939
Publication numberUS 2244030 A, US 2244030A, US-A-2244030, US2244030 A, US2244030A
InventorsTeehan John F
Original AssigneeTeehan John F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 2244030 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1941- J. F. TEEHAN 2,244,030

SHOE

Filed March 5, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet l Jupe 3, 1941. J, F, TEEHAIQ 2,244,030

SHOE

Filed March 3, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 fzwizfir 2707272 f (756% Patented June 3, 1941 UNITED STATES P 15 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in the art of shoemaking. An object of the invention is to provide a shoe in which are eliminated certain sources of discomfort, and which may be economically made without sacrifice of quality. To this end, according to the invention, the interior of the upper is made as smooth as possible, eliminating or minimizing ridges and bumps in the shoe, especially in that part of the upper which bears on the front bony ridge of the instep of the foot. This ridge does not extend along the midline of the normal foot but is offset toward the inner side of the foot. In the ordinary 0X- ford shoe, one edge of the tongue usually forms a ridge in the shoe which is apt to press directly on the bony ridge of the instep and to cause discomfort.

Furthermore, the tongue of the ordinary oxford shoe forms a bunch at its base where it is attached to the upper. In making cheaper shoes the tongue is usually held in place while the vamp is being stitched to the quarters, the base of the tongue being traversed by the line of stitching to secure the tongue in place. Then the portion of the tongue below the line of stitching is trimmed off. In better shoes, when the vamp lining is stitched to the quarter linings, the stitching is interrupted at the throat of the vamp, and the tongue is pocketed between the overlapping portions of the vamp lining and quarters at the throat, and the base of the tongue is secured by a short line of stitching through the lining, tongue and quarters. The vamp is then stitched to the quarters, this stitching passing through the lining and tongue. Then the vamp lining is trimmed at the throat of the vamp. In either case, the tongue forms a bunch with the vamp and quarters at thethroat of the vamp, which is often a source of irritation to the foot of the wearer. The tongue itself frequently causes trouble by buckling and slipping to one side. 7

According to the present invention, the tongue and all of the troubles consequent to its use are eliminated. In lieu thereof one of the quarter linings is made with an extension at its forward end, forming a wing which underlies both rows of eyelets, or, if there are no eyelets, the portions of the quarters in which the eyelets are usually mounted. This wing is an extension on the lining of the inner quarter, that is, the quarter on the inner side of the foot, and extends across the bony ridge of the instep without gap or seam, terminating at the outer side of the foot.

The wing preferably has the approximate size andshape of a tongue and underlies the abutting fore portions of the quarters which a tongue usually underlies. The wing not only improves the comfort of the shoe but simplifies the manufacture thereof'by eliminating the necessity for making, inserting and trimming the tongue in the customary manner. The inner quarter is provided with an eyelet stay, preferably of the same material as the lining, which can be assemo bled with the quarters and linings in a number of different ways as hereinafter described. For example, the upper can be assembled in such a way that the inner faces of the quarter linings are substantially free from stitching, except for the marginal line of top-stitching and a line of stitching joining the fore parts of the linings to the vamp lining. An all-leather lining for the upper may also be employed, if desired, and. such lining may consist of two pieces, each extending from heel to toe. These pieces may be joined by stitching at or near the heel and also by a line of stitching extending along the mid-line of the shoe from the throat of the vamp to the toe. As hereinafter described, these linings can .be secured to the quarters by the line of top stitching only, leaving the central areas free of stitchmg.

Another object of the invention is to assemble the parts of the upper in such a manner as to form a pocket between the wing of the quarter lining and the facing which is secured thereto. This is of especial importance in the case of shoes which are fastened by zippers or the like. It is evident that shoes with that type of fastening necessarily have a definite instep measurement which cannot be adapted to different feet as can laced shoes. Furthermore, when an upper having a zipper fastening is pulled over the last, it is drawn so tightly against the surface of the last that the zipper tab cannot be moved to undo the fastening for the removal of the last. According to the present invention, the wing of the quarter lining and the facing piece therefor are secured together in such a manner as to form a pocket into which is inserted a filled piece of substantially incompressible material such as sole leather, for example. The upper is then pulled over a last which has been built with an average instep measurement. When the time comes to pull the last, the filler piece is first withdrawn from the pocket, easing the upper so that the zipper tab can be moved to undo the fastening. Then the last can be removed from the shoe. A soft felt filler piece may be inserted in the pocket previously occupied by the leather filler, whereupon the shoe will fit a foot of average instep measurement. By the removal of the felt filler or the substitution of a thicker one, the shoe can readily be adapted to fit feet having in step measurements larger or smaller than the average.

For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following description thereof, and to the drawings of which Figure 1 is a plan view of a shoe upper embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan View of the same.

Figure 3 is a plan view of a partly assembled upper, without the vamp.

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4,-t of Fi ure 3.

Figures 5 and 6 are sectional views similar to Figure 4 but showing modified forms of the inshoe, quarter linings 24, andrzt for the respective quarters, a vamp'28, an eyelet stay 3d, and a facing piece 32. The fore parts of the quarters have edge portions 33 which are adapted to abut each other, actually or approximately, when the shoe is worn. The portion of each quarter adjacent to its edge 33 is hereinafter referred 'to as the eyelet portion, whether or not eyelets happen to be employed in any particular shoe.

As is customary in modern shoemaking, shoes are made in pairs, each pair being designed so that one of the quarters is shaped to fit against the inner side of the wearers foot, that is, the side of the foot adjacent to the other foot of the wearer, the other quarter being shaped to fit against the outer side of the wearers foot, that is, the side remote from the other foot. The inner side of the upper is usually indicated by a pair of shallow recesses 34 in the edge of the vamp. This serves to prevent confusion between rights and'lefts in assembling and lasting the uppers.

According to the present invention, the quarter lining 24 for the outer quarter of the shoe is cut out in the ordinary manner to be sewed to the quarter. The 'quarter lining 2'6 for the inner quarter ismade with'an extension 48 forming a wing which underlies the feyelet portions of the two quarters in lieu of the usual tongue. Since the leather customarily used for the quarter linings is different in color from that used for the quarters, the front face of the wing at is preferably treated to give it a color similar to that of the quarters so that the wing will not be conspicuous through the eyelet holes or the crevice between the edges of the eyelet portions -'of the quarters. To this end, the front face of the wing may be suitably finished and dyed, or, as indicated on the drawings, a facing piece 32 may be secured to the front face of the wing, this facing piece being preferably of leather similar to that used in thequarters. The quarter linings 24 and fishown in Figures 1 to 3.are preferably of leather and extend continuously from heel to toe, thus underlyingthe vamp as well as the quarters. If preferred, the usual textile vamp lining (not shown) may be used with quarter linings which underlie the quarters only and. are stitched to the vamp lining in the usual manner. Where all-leather linings are used, as indicated in Figure 2, the inner and outer side linings may be stitched together along their foriii) ward portions as at 42, this stitching extending from the throat of the vamp to the toe of the upper. V

The parts of the upper illustrated in Figures 1 to 3 may be assembled in various ways. The facing piece 32 may be secured to the front face of the wing it by a suitable adhesive which is preferably reinforced by a line of stitching M along the top margin, or, as hereinafter described, the facing may be. secured to the wing by lines of stitching along the side edges of the facing. The eyelet stay 30, which is preferably of the same kind of material as that of the quarter linings, is stitched to the inner quarter by an ornamental line of stitching 46 back of the row of eyelets 48. A corresponding ornamental line G9 is stitched on the outer quarter 20 The line 'of top stitching Ed (on the right shoe) is then begun and extended along the front edge of the quarter 22 and eyelet stay 38 It will be observed (see Figure 4) that the usual reinforcing strips 51 and 53 are provided and positioned against the interior face of the forward portions of the quarters. The lines of stitching 46 and 5E! pass through and secure the strip 5| between the stay 39 and the inner quarter, while the lines of stitching 49 and 50 secure the other strip 53 between the outer quarter 20 and its lining 26. As is customary, the machine which does the top stitching also trims the eyelet stay and linings as it goes along so that the edge of the quarter projects slightlybeyond the trimmed edges of the eyelet stay and linings. After stitching along the forward edge of the eyelet stay to a suitable point, the machine passes from the eyelet stay to the top edge of the inner quarter lining 26. A

notch 52 is provided in the edge of the quarter lining so that the feed wheel of the sewing machine can ride onto the inner face of the quarter lining 26, the wing 4F] being turned back out of the way as shown in Figure 11. The top stitching and undertrimming thus proceed along the top of the inner quarter and around the heel, joining the inner quarter 22 to its lining 26 along the portion of the top edge rearward of the notch 52. The top stitching is then continued along the top edge and front edge of the outer quarter 26 and its lining '24, eventually terminating at the throat of the vamp in the usual manner. On left shoes, the top stitching starts on the outer quarter and terminates on the inner quarter; The vamp 28 may then be stitched to the quarters along the line 5 the forward'parts of the linings 2 and 26 being preferably turned back so that the vamp stitching does not go through the linings. The lined upper thus presents a smooth interior as indicated in Figure 2, the linings being free from stitching except along certain portions of their edges. This results in additional comfort for the foot.

As indicated in Figures'2 and 3, the wing extension 4.0, as defined by its free end edge and the notch 52, is approximately the size and shape of a conventional shoe tongue and is disposed symmetrically with respect to the opening between the front edges of the quarters. Hence the notch 5'2, which marks the point nearest to said opening at which the lining element 23 is secured to its quarter 22, is spaced from said opening by a distance approximately equal to half the width of a conventional shoe tongue. Thus the eyelet portion of the quarter 22 can readily be'turned back from the wing til to perrnit the threading'of laces through the eyelets.

Instead of initially stitching the eyelet stay to the forward portion of the inner quarter as shown in Figure 1, the eyelet stay may be stitched to the lining 26 as shown at 56 in Figure 5. This may be done when it is desired to omit the ornamental lines of stitching back of the eyelet rows. After the facing 32 has been attached to the front face of the wing 46 and the eyelet stay has been stitched to the inner quarter lining 26 by a line of stitching 56, the quarters, linings and eyelet stay may then be: joined together by the top stitching as hereinbefore described.

Another method of assembling the various parts of the upper is illustrated in Figure 6. As therein shown the eyelet stay 30 is stitched along its rear edge to a side edge of the facing j;

32. The opposite side edge of the facing is stitched to the free end of the wing .9 by a line of stitching 58. Prior to stitching the facing to the wing 40 alongthe line 58, the facing is sprung so that it bulges outward to stand away from the wing 49 and form a pocket therewith for a purpose hereinafter explained. The stitching 58 forms one side of the pocket, the other side being formed either by the line of vamp stitching 54 by which the vamp is subsequently joined to the quarters, or by another line of stitching 53 indicated in Figure 8 extending along the opposite side margin of the facing 32 and joining such margin to the wing ill. The

pocket formed by the wing 40 and its facing 32 is g of particular importance and value in the making of shoes having fastening devices for the quarters which, unlike laces, are not adjustable to permit a spread or gap between the forward edges of the quarters along the eyelet portions thereof to adjust the instep of the shoe to the foot of the wearer. In order to provide a pocket of suitable width, the wing 41! must be at least as wide as the pocket and is preferably about the size and shape of a conventional shoe tongue, as illustrated in Figure 10. Hence the notch 52, which marks the point nearest to the front opening between the quarters at which the lining element 25 is secured to its quarter 22, is spaced from said opening a distance approximately equal to half the width of a conventional shoe tongue. In Figure '7 there is shown an oxford having a zipper fastening device Ell to fasten the shoe. This type of device is unyielding and non-adjustable. According to the present invention, the last 62 is constructed with an average instep measurement. Prior to pulling the upper over the last, a tab or increaser 64 of flexible but comparatively non-compressible material, such as sole leather, is inserted in the pocket between the wing 49 and the facing 32. The upper is then pulled over the last and the shoe is completed on the last in the usual manner. The pullingover operation draws the upper so tightly against the surface of the last that the zipperclosing slide 66 cannot be moved to undo the fastening. This difficulty is overcome by withdrawing the tab 64 from the pocket to provide slack in the upper across the instep. This permits movement of the slide 66 to undo the zipper fastening and permit the removal of the. shoe from the last. The pocket is then ready to receive a flat pad of felt or the like if the latter is needed to ensure a correct fit on the instep of the wearer. made with an average instep measurement, a felt pad of approximately the same thickness as the leather tab 64 will cause the shoe to fit a foot having an average instep measurement corresponding to the size of the shoe. For larger If, as stated, the last is insteps, a thinner pad of felt may be used in the pocket or the pad may be omitted altogether. For smaller than average instep measurements, thicker or multiple pads may be inserted in the pocket.

As will be observed in Figure 8, the fastening elements of the zipper device are attached to tapes 61, these tapes being stitched to the under face of the marginal portions of the quarters along the front edges; In order to anchor the zipper device properly, reinforcing elements must underlie and be secured to the tapes 57 along the edges of the opening. On one side of the front opening of the upper the quarter lining itself serves as such reinforcing element, being stitched to its quarter along the front edge thereof and to the tape 67 which is sandwiched in between it and the front portion of the quarter. On the other side of the opening, the strip 31! is provided as the reinforcing element since on this side of the opening the quarter lining has the extension wing fill which must not be attached to the quarter so close to the front opening as to interfere with the operation of the zipper fastener. Since the zipper as illustrated is located in a portion of the upper which is considerably curved to fit over the front of the foot and is normally subjected to considerable tension when the shoe is being worn, the point of attachment of the wing extension and its quarter nearest to the front edge of the quarter must be considerably spaced from such edge for free operation of the zipper. The reinforcing strip 36 is thus disposed between the point of attachment of the wing extension and the adjacent front edge of its quarter to provide reinforcement for the zipper tape on that side of the opening.

It is evident that various modifications and changes may be made in the embodiment of the invention herein shown and described Without departing from the spirit or scope thereof as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A shoe upper having quarters having an opening at the front of the upper, and a pair of quarter lining elements each extending from the back of the upper continuously to the front thereof, one of said elements having a wing extension in lieu of a tongue, said wing being arranged to extend across the front bony ridge of the foot and to underlie said opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element.

2. A shoe upper having quarters having an opening at the front of the upper, quarter lining elements, the element on the outer side of the shoe being stitched to the front edge of its quarter, the other lining element having a wing in lieu of a tongue arranged to extend across the front bony ridge of the foot and beyond the line of abutment of the quarters to underlie an adjacent portion of the lining element on the outer side, and a facing piece substantially cover ing the front face of said wing.

3. A shoe upper having quarters for theiinner side and outer side of the shoe, quarter linings secured to said quarters, the lining for the inner side of the shoe having an extension adapted to extend across the front bony ridge of the foot and to underlie the eyelet portions of both quarters, an eyelet stay secured to the inner quarter by a line of edge of said inner quarter, a facing piece on the front face of said lining extension, a line of stitching securing one side edge of said facing piece to the free end of the extension, and'anstitching along the front other line of stitching securing the other side of the facing piece to the back edge of said eyelet stay but not penetrating the adjacent quarter or lining,

4. A shoe upper having quarters and quarter lining elements, the lining element on the inner side of the shoe having an extension at the fore part of the shoe forming a wing extending across the mid-line of the shoe in lieu of a tongue and underlying the eyelet portion of the opposite quarter, said liningelement having no stitching through the fore part thereof other than along the margins thereof, and an eyelet stay secured to the fore part of the inner quarter and located between said inner quarter and the adjacent portion of said wing.

5. A shoe upper having quarters and quarter lining elements, the lining element on the inner side of the shoe having an extension at the fore part of the shoe forming a wing which extends across the mid-line of the shoe in lieu of a tongue and underlies a portion of the other lining element, said lining element on the inner side of the shoe having no stitching therethrough other than along margins thereof, an eyelet stay secured to the fore part of the inner quarter and located between said inner quarter and the adjacent portion of said wing, and a facing on the front face of said wing secured to the free end of the wing by a line of stitching along one side edge of the facing and secured to said eyelet stay by a line of stitching along the other side edge the facing which does not penetrate said lining. 6. A shoe upper having quarters, a vamp stitched to said quarters, and a pair of lining elements extending continuously from heel to toe and secured to said quarters by top stitching, said lining elements being entirely free from stitching except at margins thereof, the lining element for the inner side of the shoe having an integral wing extending across the mid-line of the upper to underlie the eyelet portions of both quarters.

7. A shoe upper having quarters, a vamp stitched to said quarters, a pair of lining elements extending continuously from heel to toe and secured to said quarters by top stitching, said lining elements being entirely free from stitching except at margins thereof, the lining element for the inner side of the shoe having an integral wing extending across the mid-line of the upper to underlie the eyelet portions of both quarters, and a facing piece secured to the front face of said wing. V

8. A shoe upper having quarters having an opening at the front of the upper, a pair of quarter lining elements, one of said elements having a wing extension in lieu of a tongue, said extension underlying said opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element, and eyelets in. said upper adjacent to said opening, said wingextension being secured to its quarter at a point sufficiently spaced from said opening to permit proper threading of said eyelets with a shoe lace. i

9. A shoe upper having quarters having an quarter lining elements, one of said elements having a wing extension approximately the size and shape of a conventional shoe tongue underlying the opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element, a facing piece secured to said wing along the side margins thereof to form a pocket for an increaser, and fastening means carried by said quarters adjacent to said opening.

: opening at the front of the upper, a pair of V edge.

10. A shoe upper having quarters having'an opening at the front of the upper, a pair of quarter lining elements, one of said elements having a wing extension approximately the size and shape of a conventional shoe tongue underlying the opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element, a facing piece secured to said wing along the side margins thereof to form a pocket for an increaser, and a slide fastener device on the front edges of said quarters.

11. A shoe upper having quarters having an opening at the front of the upper, a pair of quarter lining elements, one of said elements having a wing extension in lieu of a tongue, said extension underlying the opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element, fastening means secured to the front of said quarters, and strips on said quarters receiving said fastening means, said wing extension being secured to its quarter at a point in back of the strip so as to permit proper functioning of the fastening 7 means. 7

12. A shoe upper having quarters having an opening at the front of the upper, a. pair of quarter lining elements, one of elements having a wing extension in lieu of a tongue, said extension underlying the opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element, eyelets secured to the front of said quarters, and eyelet reinforcing strips on said quarters receiving said eyelets, said wing extension being secured to its quarter at a point in back of the strip to permit bending back of the front of the quarter sufficiently to allow threading the lace through the eyelets.

13. A shoe upper having quarters and lining elements joined to said quarters by top stitching, one of said lining elements having an extension at its forward end adapted to serve as a tongue for the shoe, said one lining element having a notch in the upper edge thereof spaced rearwardly'from the front edge of the adjacent quarter, the line of top stitching in said adjacent quarter extending forward from the heel portion to said notch and leaving the lining element at said notch to continue along the top and front edges of said adjacent quarter.

14. A shoe upper having quarters and a lining element joined to said quarters by top stitching, said lining element having an extension at its forward end adapted to serve as a tongue for the shoe, said lining element having a notch inthe upper edge thereof spaced rearwardiy from the front edge of the adjacent quarter, the line of top stitching in said adjacent quarter extending forwardly from the heel portion thereof to said notch and leaving the lining element at said notch to continue aiong the top and front edges of said adjacent quarter.

15. A shoe upper having quarters having opening between the front edges thereof, a'pair of quarter lining elements, one of said elements having a wing extension in lieu of a tongue, said extension underlying the opening and the adjacent portion of the other lining element and being attached to its quarter at a pointspaced from said opening, fastening means secured to the front of said quarters, and a reinforcing strip receiving said fastening means disposed between said point of attachment of the wing extension to its quarter and the adjacent front edge of the quarter and extending along said adjacent front JOHN F. 'IEEHAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2515050 *Mar 21, 1947Jul 11, 1950Goodrich Co B FMethod of making full-lined boots
US2995837 *Nov 8, 1960Aug 15, 1961Joseph F Corcoran Shoe Co IncShoe of convertible type
US4373275 *Oct 3, 1980Feb 15, 1983Lydiard Shoe Co. Ltd.Footwear
US5337493 *Jun 30, 1992Aug 16, 1994K-Swiss Inc.Shoe with a tongue extending from a liner
US5647149 *Feb 25, 1994Jul 15, 1997Daleboot UsaSport boot inner liner
US5673448 *Nov 4, 1993Oct 7, 1997Intuition Sports IncorporatedSport boot liner and method for making same
US6094841 *Oct 6, 1998Aug 1, 2000In-Stride, Inc.Tongue for footwear
US6449879Feb 2, 2001Sep 17, 2002Nike, Inc.Sports shoe with integral tongue and lacing system
US7543397Sep 28, 2006Jun 9, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear for fencing
US7562471Dec 4, 2006Jul 21, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with gripping system
US8042289Apr 29, 2009Oct 25, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with gripping system
WO1982000573A1 *Aug 18, 1981Mar 4, 1982Alberts RShoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/54, 36/55
International ClassificationA43C11/00, A43C11/12, A43B23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43B23/02, A43C11/12
European ClassificationA43C11/12, A43B23/02