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Publication numberUS2245932 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 17, 1941
Filing dateJan 10, 1938
Priority dateJan 10, 1938
Publication numberUS 2245932 A, US 2245932A, US-A-2245932, US2245932 A, US2245932A
InventorsMiller William G
Original AssigneeR C Mahon Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint spraying machine
US 2245932 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v June 17, 1941. w. G. MILLER PAINT SPRAYING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Jan. 10,' 1958 JEH.

June 17, 1941. w G. MILLER PAINT SPRAYING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 10, 1938 Qleazx.

A TTORNEYS.

6 Sheets-Shea?l 3 w. G. MILLER Filed Jan'. 1o, 1958 PAINT SPRAYING MACHINE June 17, 1941.v

June 17, 1941. w. G. MILLER PAINT SPRAYING MACHINE Filed Jan. 1o, 193e 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 bNL (NNN June 17, 1941.' w GA, M|| ER 2,245,932

PAINT SPRAYING MACHINE 'Filed Jan. 10, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 a? 1N VENTOR BY f 6. fill/n A TTORNE yes.

June 17, 194.1. w, G, M|LLER 2,245,932

PAINT SPRAYING MGHINE Filed Jan. 10, 1938 6 ShveetsbSheet 6 Patented June 17, 1941 PAINT SPRA'YING MACHINE william G. Miller, neu-oit, Mich., assignor to The R. C. Mahon Company, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application January 10, 1938, Serial No. 184,148

11 Claims. (Cl. 91*45) I This invention relates to machines for autoa matically painting irregularly shaped articles and is particularly adapted for painting automobile bodies.

The main objects of this invention are to provide an improved paint spray machine which has a wide range of operation; to provide a paint spray machine which will maintain the Spraying nozzle a predetermined desired distance from the surface of the objectbeing painted; to provide a paint spray machine which may be readily changed to paint diierently shaped objects having a wide range of contour particularly in the matter of vertical height; to provide a paint spray machine which will maintain the spray nozzle substantially perpendicular to the surface being painted; to provide a paint spray machine which will apply a uniform coat of paint free from objectionable overlaps which might cause the paint to run; to provide an improved paint spray machine which will immediately cease applying the paint should the object being painted stop its movement through the machine; to provide an improved paint spray machine which may be readily synchronized with a conveyer line so as to maintain a continuous operation for maximum production; to provide a paint spray machine of wide utility and of simple and sturdy construction, and to provide a paint spray machine which will require relatively little powerl to operate due to the counterbalancing of the main moving part.

An illustrative embodiment of this invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of the improved machine in full lines and with a fragmentary portion thereof shown in dotted lines in a position to paint the lower rear end of an automobile body.

Fig. 2 is a view in end elevation of the'same, taken from the position of the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the same. Fig. 4 is 'an enlarged view partly in section an showing the carriage supporting and paint nozzle positioning tracks in elevation, the section being taken along the line 4 4 of Fig. 1.

view taken along the line 1-1 of Flg. 5, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken along the line 8 8 of Fig. 7, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Fig.VV 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 9-9 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

l Fig, 10 is a view similar to'Fig. 7, but with the solenoids energized to raise the trigger control track so that paint 'will be sprayed from the.

nozzle when the carriage is moved inwardly from the ends of its trackway. Fig. 1l is a fragmentary sectional View, taken along the line II-II of Fig. 1'0, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

linv the particular mechanism herein illustrated a supporting structure comprising a pair of horizontally spaced vertically disposed fabricated structures, generally designated I5 and I6 in Fig. 2 of the drawings, are shown positioned in spaced relation at opposite sides of a conveyer trackway I'l. The track is adapted to have wheel cars or dollies I8 pass therealong, and it is customary to have the dollies moved by a link chain I9 shown most clearly in Figs. 2 and 6v of the drawings. Automobile bodies 20 are shown carried by the dollies I8, but it will be understood that the mechanism and apparatus herein shown and described is equally well adapted to the painting of a wide variety of articles or objects Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line and is in no wise hunted to the painting of automobile bodies.

The supporting structures I5 and IB are of substantially identical construction and comprise a plurality' of vertically disposed posts 2|, which. in the embodiment shown, are heavy angles and which are arranged in spaced relation one at each corner of a rectangular shaped structure. Horizontally disposed top and base members 22 and 23 respectively have vtheir respective ends secured to the upper and lower ends of the vertical posts 2| respectively by gusset plates 24. Suitable diagonal braces 25,v also formed of angle iron, are riveted to the gusset plates so as to give longitudinal rigidityl to the structure in a plane normal to it, as viewed in Fig. 1 of the drawings.

Diagonally disposed braces 26 are riveted to the inwardly extending anges of the corner posts 2|, as best illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawings. for imparting lateral rigidity to the fabricated structure.

It will be understood, of course, that these vertically disposed spaced supports may be formed from any suitable material and by any desired construction or may be part of the bullding structure in which the paint machine is housed, as the sole purpose and function of these structures are to support the operating movable mechanism hereinafter to be described.

The space between the vertical supports I5 and I6 is spanned by a jack shaft 21, one end of which is journaled in axially spaced bearing boxes 28 and 29 mounted on the top horizontally disposed members of the supporting struc-ture I5, and the other end of which is journaled in axially spaced bearing boxes 30 and 3| similarly mounted on the top of the supporting structure I6.

The jack shaft 21 supports and has pivotally mounted thereon a superstructure generally design-ated 32 in Fig. l. The superstructure 32 is substantially rectangularly shaped in plan view and is formed by a pair of spaced parallel truss members generally designated 33 and 34 in Fig. 3 of the drawings, and which are held in such position by transverse members 35, 36, 31 and 38. which are rigidly secured to the side trusses by rivets and gusset plates in the usual manner of fabricating structures of this character. Diagonals 39 and 40 are also provided for imparting rigidity to the structure and a medial brace 4I is also provided, one end of which is riveted to the gusset plate 42 secured to the cross member 35, and the other end of which is riveted to a gusset plate 43 which is secured preferably by Welding to the cross members 36 and 31.

As shown most clearly in Fig. l of the drawings, each side truss comprises a base member 44 of channel cross section, a pair of inclined members 45 and 46, one end of each of which is secured to the respective opposite ends of the base member 44, and the other ends of each of which is secured to the upper end of a vertical post 41, the lower end of which is secured to the medial par-t of the base member 44 by riveting two gusset plates 48 and 49 at the upper and lower ends respectively of the post 41.

The left end of the superstructure, as viewed in Fig. l of the drawings, is provided with a motor and reduction gear support fabricated from a plurality of plates and angles, and generally designated 50.

The superstructure is journaled on the jack shaft 21 by means of journal bearing boxes 5| and 52 which are bolted to the upper surfaces of the base members 44 of the side trusses 3 3 and 34 respectively. Short angle bars 53 are welded to the inner sides of the base members 44 with one flange thereof extending in alignment with and disposed oppositely to the top ange of the base member so as to provide a good bearing seat upon which the bearings 5I and 52 are bolted.

The bearing boxes 5I and 52 are located adjacent to one end of the superstructure but are spaced inwardly from such adjacent end so that the motor and reduction gearing mechanism mounted on the support 50 serve as a partial counterbalance for the superstructure.

At the apex of the side trusses, the cross members 36 and 31, opposite ends of which project beyond the sides of the superstructure, carry bearing journal boxes 54 and 5.5 bolted to end pla-tes 56 and 51 respectively which are welded to the projecting ends of the cross members 36 and 31. A bea-ring journal box 58 is also bolted to the top surface of the gusset plate 43 and the three bearings 54, 55 and 58 are ln axial alignment and have journaled therein a cam follower shaft 59, the opposite ends of which project beyond their respective end bearings and have rigidly keyed thereto double flanged roller Wheels 60 and 6I.

The rollers 60 and 6I ride upon and their flanges embrace opposite sides of vertically disposed duplicate contour cams 62 and 63 respectively which are journaled on horizontal transversely disposed countershafts 64 and 65 respectively. The countershaft 64 is journaled in a pair of axially spaced bearing journal boxes 66 and 61 which are bolted to the top of the supporting structure I5 in spaced parallel relation to the bearing boxes 28 and 29 in which jack shaft 21 is journaled. Likewise the countershaft is journaled in a pair of axially spaced bearing journal boxes 68 and 69 which are bolted to the top of the supporting structure I6 in spaced parallel relation to the jack shaftbearing boxes 30 and 3|.

1 Means are provided for rotating the contour cams 62 and 63 so as to swing the outer free en'l of the superstructure in a vertical plane and comprise an electric motor |00 geared to an adjustable speed box I0| which in turn drives a worm gear reduction unit |02. Shaft |03 of the worin reduction gear has a chain sprocket |04 keyed thereto which receives a roller link chain |05 which passes around and drives the chain sprocket |06 keyed to the jack shaft 21. shaft 21 at points closely adjacent to the outer bearing boxes 28 and 3| has keyed thereto relatively small sprockets |01 and |08 respectively which receive and drive chains |09 and I I0 respectively. The chains |08 and IIO pass around and drive relatively large chain sprockets I I I and I I 2 respectively which are keyed to shafts 64 and 65, thus transmitting a relatively slow drive to the contour cams 62 and 63 which are likewise keyed to the shafts 64 and 65.

The end of the superstructure opposite to that which is pivotally mounted to the space supports has a cross head, generally designated 10 in Fig. 3 of the drawings, plvotally mounted between the projecting ends 1| and 12 of the side trusses 33 and 34. The cross head 10, as shown most clearly in Fig. 8 of the drawings, comprises a horizontally disposed upper channel member 13 and a horizontally disposed lower channel member 14, both having their flanges extending upwardly, which are rigidly secured in spaced parallel relation by verticallydisposed end channels 15 and 16 and angle irons 11 riveted thereto, and thus orming a rectangular structure having top and bottom and ends but with the sides open. The end channels have their anges disposed outwardly with respect to the structure.

The upper member 13 has its opposite ends projecting beyond the vertical end channels 15 and 16 and have journal bearing boxes 18 and 19 bolted theretoin which are journaled one end respectively,'of short stub shafts 80 and 8|, the other respective ends of which are journaled in bearing boxes 82 and 83 respectively which are bolted to angle brackets 84 and 85 respectively and which are welded to the projecting ends 1I and 12 respectively of the side trusses.

Means are provided for rocking the cross head 10 on its pivotal support and comprise a pair of stub shafts 86 and 81, one end of each of which is journaled in bearing boxes 88 and 89 respectively which are bolted to the lower cross head member 14. The other end of each of the shafts 86 and 81 are journaled in bearing boxes 90 and 9|. The bearing journal box 90 is rigidly bolted The jack to one end of a connecting rod 92,-and the journal bearing box 9| is bolted to one end ofva channel shaped connecting rod 93.' 'Ihe opposite end of the connecting rod 93 has a journal bearing box 94 bolted to the underside thereof in which is journaled one end of a stub shaft 95, the other end of which'is rigidly mounted in the end 86 of a bell crank lever 91 which oscillates on a fixed pivot 98 by means of a rigidly mounted stub shaft 99 which is journaled in a bearing box ||5 rigidly bolted to the motor and transmission support 50. The other arm of the bell crank has va double flanged roller ||6 journaled betweenv the outer ends thereof which is arranged to embrace opposite sides of and ride upon the periphery of a focusing cam ||1.

The cam ||1, as shown most lclearly in Fig'. 9 of the drawings, is mounted on a hub ||8 which has a bushing I9 and which is journaled loosely on the jack shaft 21. The other end of the hub ||8 is shaped to provide an integrally formed chain sprocket |20 which receives a drive chain |2|. The chain |2| also passes around and is driven by a chain sprocket |22 which is keyed to the shaft 64 on an end thereof which protrudes inwardly from its bearing box 61, the sprockets |22 and |20 being of the same size so that the focusing cam H1 and the contour cam 52 are driven in synchronism' and at a one to one ratio.

A helical tension spring |23 has one end thereof secured to the connecting rod 93 and the other end thereof anchored to the base member 44 of the side truss and is under tension at all times so as to swing the connecting rod to the left, as viewed in Fig. 1 of the drawings, and thereby maintain contact of the roller ||6 with the periphery of the focusing cam ||1.

Likewise the opposite end of the connecting rod 92 has a journal bearing box |24 rigidly bolted thereto in .which is journaled one end of a stub shaft |25, the other end of which is rigidly mounted to'the end |26 of one arm of abell crank lever |21.' 'Ihe bell crank |21 is journaled on a xed pivot by a rigidly supported stub shaft |28 which is journaled in bearing box |29 bolted' to the side truss 34. The outer end of the other arm of the bell crank |21 hasa dou-ble anged roller |30 journaled therebetween which embraces opposite sides of and rides upon the peripheral edge of a focusing cam |3|.

tangular shape, a front plate |30 ofthe same shape held in spaced parallel relation to the back The focusing cam |3| is a duplicate of the cam |1 and is likewise mounted upon a hushed hub which carries an integrally formed chain sprocket |32 which receives a drive chain |33. The chain |33 passes around and is driven by plate by short shafts rigidly secured to the front and back plates near the four corners thereof and lupon which are journaled four double hanged rollers |39,`|40, |4| and |42. The rollers |39 and |40 ride upon the top edge of 'the track |36 with their flanges embracing the opposite side edges thereof and the rollers |4| and |42 fit snugly against and bear upon the lower edge of the track |36 with their flanges embracing the opposite side edges of the trackway, as shown most clearly in Figs. '1 and 8.

Means are provided for reciprocating the carriage from one end to the other of its supporting trackway and comprise an electric motor |43 having a V belt pulley |44 on its armature shaft which drivesy a V belt |45. The belt |45 passes around and drives a V belt pulley |46 secured to one shaft of a speed reducer |41. The output shaft of the speed reducer |41 is provided with a double V belt pulley wheel which drives belts |48 which pass around and drive a similar pulley wheel secured to one end ofl a shaft |49 which is journaled in axially spaced bearings |50 and |5|. The bearings |50 and |5| are bolted to the top surface of a pair of angles |52 and |53. Ihe angle |52 has its opposite ends rigidly secured to the end channels 15 and 16, and the angle |53 is secured thereto so as to form a T section. with one endof the angle |53 overlapping the side flange of the end channel 16 and secured thereto, and the other end thereof secured to the side ange of a vertically disposed channel brace |54 which is rigidly secured to the side flanges of the upper and lower cross head channels 13 and 14 vsubstantially midway of their ends.

The opposite end of the shaft |49 has a double anged at belt pulley wheel |55 rigidly secured thereto which receives and drives a fiat belt |56. The belt |56 extends horizontally and passes around a double anged belt idler pulley |51 which is rigidly mounted-on one end of a shaft |58.` The shaft |58 is journaled in axially spaced bearing boxes |59 and |60 which are bolted-to the top side of horizontally extending flanges of the angle |52 and an oppositely disposed angle |6| which is secured thereto to form a T section structure, one end of which overlaps and is secured to a side flangeof the end channel 15, and the other end of which is rigidly secured to the side flange of the channel brace |54.

The belt |56 has a rectangularlyfshaped pin a chain sprocket |34 keyed to the inner protrading end of the shaft 65 so that the focusing cam |3| and contour cam 63 are driven in unison at the same speed.

A helical tension spring |35 is also provided for holding the roller |30 in contact with the vfocusing cam |3|,. one end of the spring being attached to the connecting rod 92 and the other respectivelyA and forms a carriage supporting' trackway.

A paint-spray nozzle supporting carriage isA reciprocably mounted on the trackway |36 and comprises a -back plate |31 of substantially rec- Journaled therein, as shown most clearly in Fig. 1l. One end of the pin |63 is rigidly mounted in one end of a pitman arm |64, the other end of the pitman arm |64 has one end of a headed bearing Pin |65rigidly mounted thereon. The pin |65 extends through a hushed opening in a relatively thick center portion of the back plate |31 with the head Vthereof on the inside of the back plate, as shown most clearly in Fig. 8.

As shown most clearly in Fig, 11, the front face of the front plate |38 is provided with a pair of vertically disposed slides or guideways |66 and |61 mounted thereon in spaced parallel relation which embrace a vertically movable slide plate |68, the marginal edges of which are embraced in opposed grooves |69 of the guides |66 and |61.

As lshown most clearly in Fig. 8, the lower end of 5 relationship to the plate |68.. The upper end of a roller |15 journaled on a headed pin |16 which is rigidly mounted in a boss |11 formed on the face of the plate |68. The roller |15 rides on the top edge of a horizontally disposed contour track |18 which is formed of a rectangularly shaped bar disposed edgewlse and having its opposite ends bolted to the side anges of the cross head end channels 15 and 16 in spaced parallel relationship thereto, filler blocks |19 and |80 being interposed. l

Means are provided for holding the slide plate roller |15 yieldingly in contact with the top edge of the contour track |18 at all times during its reciprocation and comprise a helical tension spring |8|, one end of which is anchored to a laterally extending ange |82 of an angle bolted to the top edge of the front carriage plate |38, and the other end of which is secured to the top end of a vertically disposed brace member |83, the lower end of which is rigidly bolted to the top side of the web of channel |14, as shown most clearly in Fig. 8.

The inner opposed edges of the arms |12 and '|13 are vertically spaced parallel relation and serve as guides for a vertically movable trigger slide control which comprises a block |84, the opposite edges of which are provided with outwardly presenting grooves which receive and embrace the opposed marginal edges of the arms |12 and |13. The rear side of the block |84 is provided with a rigidly mounted headed pin |85 upon which is journaled a roller |86, and the front :face of the block has a vertically disposed arm |81 secured thereto by threaded studs |88 and |89.

The arm |81 extends downwardly from the slide block |84, and the lower end thereof is provided with a transversely disposed nger or toe |90 which is positioned to contact a roller |9| which is journaled on the outer end of a control trigger |92 of a paint spray nozzle |93.

The paint spray nozzle |93 is mounted on the front face of the upstanding part |1| of the vertically movable slide by hooking a bail |94 over a lug |95 which is mounted on the vertical slide |1| and held in position thereon by the protruding end |96 of a vertically slidable pin |91 which is slidable in spaced bosses |98 and |99 formed on the upstanding member |1|. The handle 203 of the paint spray gun fits snugly between the boss |98 and a lug |98A, which embrace opposite sides thereof.

That portion of the pin |91 which is between mounting bosses |98 and |99 is surrounded by a helical compression spring 200, the lower end of which abuts against and rests upon the boss |99, and the upper end of which bears against an enlarged head 20| formed on the upper end of the pin so as to normally urge the pin upwardly to the position shown in Figs. '7 and 8. The pin extends below the lower boss |99 and is provided with an enlarged head 202 which may be conveniently grasped by an operator for pulling the pin downwardly against the action of the spring 200 so as to release the handle portion 203 of the paint spray gun and permit it to be unhooked from the lug |95.

Compressed air is supplied to the spray gun through a ilexible pipe 204 and paint' is supplied through' a flexible pipe 205, the spray gun as a whole being of somewhat standard design and character with only slight modifications to adapt it for use in this particular environment.

Means are provided for actuating the trigger |92 through the toe |90, arm |81, slide block |84L and roller |86, and comprises a trackway 206 which is mounted in spaced parallel relationship to the contour track |18. The track 206 is contoured simllarly to the track |18 except that at the opposite ends thereof the top edge upon which the roller |86 rides is vertically spaced below the top edge of the contour track |18 a greater amount than that portion of the trackway which is inward from the ends. The track 206 is mounted on the outer face of a spacer bar 201 which is secured to the outer face of the contour track |18 and is vertically slidable thereon by reason of vertically disposed mounting slots 208 which receive the headed end of threaded studs 209 which are screwed through the spacer bar 201 and into the contour track |18.

Means are .provided for raising the trigger control track 206 and comprise a pair of solenoids 2|0 and 2|| mounted at opposite ends on the front side of the cross head and having vertically movable cores 2|2 and 213 respectively, the lower ends of which are pivotally connected to the upper ends of links 2|4 and 2I5 respectively. The other end of link 2|4 is connected to one end of a substantially horizontal lever |26,

.the other end of which is pivoted to the upper end of an upright link 2 1, the lower end of which is mounted on a xed pivot 218 of the cross head. The medial part of the lever 2|6 has the upper end of an upright link 2|9 pivoted thereto, the lower end of which is pivotally connected to one end of the trigger control track 20B.

'I'he lower end of the link 2|5 is connected to one end of a substantially horizontal lever 220, the other end of which is pivoted to the upper end of an upright link 22|, the lower end of which is mounted on a fixed pivot 222 on the cross head frame. The medial part of the lever 220 is pivotally connected to the upper end of an upright link 223, the lower end of which is pivotally connected to the opposite end of the trigger control track 206.

Means are provided or moving the conveyer chain I9 and comprise an electric motor 224, which, through 'the medium of a speed reducer 225, drives a shaft 226 journaled in bearings 221 and 228 and which carries at its medial part a chain'sprocket 229 around which the conveyer chain I9 passes.

Current is supplied to the motor 224 through the conductors 230 andV 23|, a switch 232 being provided in the conductor 23| for opening the circuit and thereby stopping the conveyer line when desired. The conductors 230 and 23| also carry current to conductors 233 and 234 which supply current to the carriage operating motor |43.V A switch 235 is provided in the conductor 23| so that the circuit from that point on may be opened without stopping the conveyer mechanism.

The conductors 230 and 23| also have bridged thereto a pair of conductors 238 and 231 which supply current tothe solenoids 2|0 and 2H, a switch 238 being provided for securing individual control of this circuit. The main circuit is also extended and supplies current to the motor |00 which drives the focusing cams and contour cams, and a switch 239 is also provided for securing individual control of the motor |43.

In the operation of this machine the duplicate contour cams 62 and 13 are laid out and made in [such shape as to hold the free swinging end of the superstructure and paint spray nozzle carried thereby a predetermined distance from the surface of the object to be painted, such as an automobile body, as such object is passed beneath the superstructure by the conveyer. In the particular example shown, the rollers 60 and 6| which control vertical swinging movement of the superstructure rest on their respective contour cams at about the point marked by the arrow 238, as shown in Fig. l, when the cowl of the automobile is in position to begin painting. 'I'he conveyer and paint machine are operated at the same time and are so synchronized that as the contour cams rotate, the object to be painted is passed along under the cross head of the superstructure and the paint spray vnozzle is maintained in predetermined distance from the object to be painted. At the same time the duplicate focusing cams ||1 and 83| are rotated in.

unison with the contour cams and through the medium of the bell cranks and the connecting rods 92 and 93, the cross head 10 is rocked on its pivotal supports so as to maintain the paint spray nozzle substantially perpendicular to the surface being painted in a vertical longitudinal plane.

When the superstructure has been moved to its initial starting position by rotation of the contour cams 62 and. 19, the manually operable switch 235 is opened, and the conveyer, by closure of the switch 232, continues to operate to bring the "object to be painted into correct starting position. At this time the switch 235 is closed as well as the switch 238 which controls the circuit to the solenoids 2|0 and 2|| and the switch 239 which controls the carriage operating mo-A tor |43, whereupon the motor ,is started, the carriage operating motor |43 isstarted and the solenoids 2|0 and 2|| are both energized.

Energizationv of the solenoids will raise their respective cores upwardly and through the system of linksand levers connected thereto will raise the vertically movable trigger operating track 206 from the position shown in Fig. 7 of the drawings to the position shown in Fig. 10. When the track 206 is raised to the position shown in Fig. 10, the`rol1er' |86 which rests thereon raises the slide |84, depending arm |81, and toe |90, which in turn lifts the trigger |92 upwardly but not suiciently to turn on the supply of the object to be painted, but when the carriage approaches the end limits of, its track,`the relative vertical distance between the top edges of the tracks |18 and 208 is such that the supply of paint and compressed air is cut off.

Should the conveyer line which is carrying the objects to be painted through the paint machine, be stopped at any time by opening of the switch 232, this will automatically stop the motors |00 and |43 and cie-energize the solenoids 2|0 and 2| and thereby immediately cut of! the supply of paint and compressed air to the nozzle so as to not build up an objectionable thickness of paint at one spot on the objectbeing painted while the conveyer line is at a standstill.

These machines are ordinarily adjusted so as to spray a very heavy but uniform coat ofV paint on j the objects being painted, and if the supply of compressed air and paint to the spray nozzle when the carriage is adjacent the respective ends of its track. As will be seen most clearly in Fig. 10, the. vertical distance between the top edge yof the track |16 and the top edge of the track 206 is materially greater at the horizontal end portions than such distance is ata point inward from its ends and where the tracks begin to take the contour of the article or object to be painted. This is also clearly illustrated in Fig. 4

paint 4was not discontinued upon stopping of the conveyer line, the paint would quickly accumulate to the point where it would flow and thus spoil the job.

Closing of the circuit to the motor |00 causes it to drive the speed reducer unit |0|, which in 'the relative large sprocket wheels and ||2 which are keyed to the shafts 64 and 65 respectively. Rotation of the shafts 64 and 65 rotate the contour cams 62 and 63 respectively and upon which rest the rollers 60 and 6| of the cam follower shaft 59. The shaft 59 is journaled on and supports the superstructure which is pivotally supported on the jack shaft 21 as va xed axis, and thereby rotation of the cams will swing the opposite end of the superstructure, i. e. the one which carries the cross head 10 in a vertical plane in accordance with the shape ci' the contour cams.

Shafts 64 and 65 have keyed thereto sprockets |22 and |23 respectively which drive chains |2| and |33 respectively. These chains pass around and drive sprockets |20 and |32, respectively. which are integrally formed at one end oi' hubs at the opposite ends of which are carried the. A

painted when considered in a vertical longitudi nal plane.

Closing of the circuit to the carriage operating motor |43 will cause actuation of the speed. reducer |41 which, through the medium of the V belts |48 and shaft |49, will rotate the double ilanged belt pulley v|55 and thus move the belt |56 which passes therearound and which passes around the idler |51. Movement of the belt |56 will carry the pitman arm |64 with it and thus I cause reciprocationof the carriage, to which it is connected, upon the track |38 from one end thereof to the other continuously while the motor |43 is energized.

If the solenoids 2|0 and 2|| are not energized during the reciprocation of the carriage on its track, the paint will not be sprayed from the spray gun by reason of the fact that the trigger |92 is not raised suillciently relative to its point of mounting, but if the solenoids are energized and the trigger control track 206 thereby raised, then the trigger will be moved sufficiently by its connecting mechanism through the medium of the roller |86 riding on the top edge of the track 206, to cause paint to be sprayed from the nozzle except at those portions of the tracks adjacent the ends thereof. Cutting off of the supply of paint at the ends of the track will result in an even and uniform coat of paint being applied to all parts oi theobject being carried by the conveyer as well as save much paint which would otherwise be wasted.

In the event it is desired to spray a diierent color of paint on the next succeeding object carried by the conveyer line, then the paint spray nozzle may be quickly removed by grasping the head 20| and pulling down on the pin |91 against the action of the spring 200, then swinging out the handle portion 203 and unhooking the bail |94 from the lug |95. Asimilar spray gun having the desired color of paint therein may then be quickly hookedover the lug |95 and swung into place and there retained by the upstanding end |86 of the pin, the handle portion 203 being snugly embraced between the boss |98 and thelug |98A which engages the upper side of the handle.

By adjusting the variable speed reducer IUI, the operating speed of the contour and focusing cams and thereby vertical swinging movement of.

and paint machine may be so synchronid as4 to produce a continuous operation of painting upon articles of similar contour when placed upon the conveyer line in predetermined 'spaced relationship.

The circuit to the solenoids 2|0 and 2|| may be controlled also by `an electric eye or some similar means whereby the spraying of the paint will not be started until the object being painted is in correct position with respect to the paint machine and will be immediately discontinued when the object has passed therethrough and been completely painted.

Although but one specific embodiment of this invention has been herein shown and described, it will be understood that numerous details of the construction shown may be altered or omitted Without departing from the spirit of this invention, as dened by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A paint spray machine comprising a supporting framework, a superstructure mounted on horizontal pivots on' said s'pporting structure and having a free end swingable in a vertical plane, a paint spray nozzle mounted on the free swinging end of said superstructure and means for swinging said superstructureV on its pivotal mounting for maintaining said spray nozzle a predetermined distance from an object to be painted.

2. A paint spray machinel comprising a supporting framework, a superstructure mounted on horizontal pivots on said supporting structure and having a free end swingable in a vertical plane. a paint spray nozzle pivoted on the free swinging end of said superstructure, a contour cam supporting the free swinging end of said superstructure, and means for rotating said cam for maintaining said spray nozzle a predetermined distance from an object to be painted.

3. A paint spray machine comprising a supporting structure, a superstructure. pivotally mounted on said supporting structure and having a free swinging end, said structures being arranged so that objects to be painted may be moved along under said superstructure, a paint spray nozzle mounted on the free swinging end of said superstructure for movement in a path transversely to the path of travel of the objects to be painted, means for moving said nozzle in its path of travel,l a contour cam supporting the free swinging end of said superstructure, means for rotating said cam for maintaining said spray nozzle a predetermined distance from the object to be painted and means for oscillating said nozzle relative to said superstructure on an axis substantially parallel to the axis of movement of said superstructure.

4. A paint spray machine comprising spaced supports adapted to have a conveyer pass therebetween, a superstructure pivotally mounted on and bridging the space between said supports. contour cams ,iournaled on said supports and engaging said superstructure for controlling movement thereof on its pivotal support, a paint spray nozzle carried on one end of said superstructure and movable thereon in a path transverse to the path of movement of the conveyer, and a focusing cam journaled on one of said structures and driven in synchronism with said contour cam for moving said spray nozzle in a plane parallel to the direction of movement of the conveyor.

5. A paint spray machine comprising spaced supports adapted to have a, conveyer line pass therebetween, a superstructure pivotally mounted on and bridging the space between said supports. a trackway pivotally carried on one end of said superstructure in spaced relation to said pivotal support. a carriage reciprocable on said trackway, a paint spray nozzle on said carriage, means for moving said superstructure to maintain said spray nozzle a predetermined distance from articles to be painted thereby, and means for rocking said trackway to secure a predetermined angularity of said nozzle with respect to the surface of the article being painted thereby.

6. A paint spray machine comprising spaced supports adapted to have a conveyer line pass therebetween, a jack shaft journalled on and bridging the space between said supports, a superstructure pivotally supported adjacent one end thereof on said jack shaft. a paint spray nozzle carried by the other end of said superstructure, contour cams journalled on said supports and driven by said jack shaft for moving said superstructure on its pivotal supports so las to maintain said nozzle a predetermined disstructure, a paint spray nozzle reciprocalble on said trackway in a path transverse to the path of travel of the conveyer, contour cams journalled on said supports and driven -by said jack shaft for moving said superstructure on its pivotal supports so as to maintain ,said nozzle a predetermined distance from the surface of objects to be painted, a focusing cam journalled on said jack shaft and driven in unison with said contour cams, connections between said focusing cam and said trackway for rocking said trackway and nozzle independently of said superstructure movement and means for driving said Jack shaft.

8. A paint spray machine comprising horizontally spaced supports, a conveyor line passing between said supports, a Jack shaft journalled on and bridging the space between said supports, a superstructure pivoted adjacent one end thereof on said jack shaft, contour cams journalled on said supports for supporting and moving the other end of said superstructure in a vertical plane, a paint spraynozzle movably' mounted on said superstructure adjacent its vertically movable end, a focusing cam and connections for oscillating said spray nozzle on a horizontal transverse axis and means for driving said contour and focusing cams in synchronism.

9. A paint spray machine comprising horizontally spaced supports, means for moving objects to be painted between said supports, a vertically swingable superstructure pivoted on said supports ona horizontal axis transverse to the direction of movement of the objects to be painted, a horizontally disposed trackway pivotally mounted on the vertically swingable end of said superstructure on a horizontal axis substantially parallel to the axis of said superstructures pivotal mounting, a carriage reciprocable on said trackway. a paint spray nozzle carried by said carriage and means for vertically swinging said superstructure and rocking said trackways in synchronism on their respective pivotal mountings whereby said nozzle will be maintained a predeterminedy distance from and at a predetermined angle with respect to the surface of ,irregularly shaped articles to be painted.

10. In a paint spray machine, a relatively straight horizontally disposed track, a carriage reciprocable on said track, a spray nozzle holder vertically slidable on said carriage, a paint spray nozzle on said holder, a contoured track adjacent said straight track for actuating and positioning said nozzle holder, a trigger on said nozzle for controlling the flow of paint through said nozzle, a third track similarly contoured and adjacent to said second mentioned track for actuating said trigger, and means for shifting one of said contoured tracks relative to the other for actuating said trigger.

11. A paint spray machine comprising a supporting framework, a superstructure swingably mounted on said supporting framework and having a free swinging end, a paint spray nozzle pivoted on the free swinging end of said superstructure and bodily movable therewith, means for moving said superstructure on its mounting for maintaining said spray nozzle a predeter- ,mined distancefrom an object to be painted,

and independent means for moving said spray nozzle on its pivotal mounting to maintain said spray nozzle normal to the surface 0i' the object to be painted.

WILLIAM G. MILLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2840037 *Apr 2, 1954Jun 24, 1958Howard V SchweitzerMechanical movement for coating apparatus
US3021227 *Sep 13, 1960Feb 13, 1962Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoMethod and apparatus for coating glass
US3276422 *Nov 5, 1963Oct 4, 1966Cyclops IncDrum painting apparatus
US6708385Dec 31, 1990Mar 23, 2004Lemelson Medical, Education And Research Foundation, LpFlexible manufacturing systems and methods
US7065856Nov 10, 1987Jun 27, 2006Lemelson Jerome HMachine tool method
US7343660May 13, 1987Mar 18, 2008Lemeison Medical, Education & Research Foundation, Limited PartnershipMachine tool system
EP0536459A1 *Dec 18, 1991Apr 14, 1993ABB Flexible Automation GmbHDevice for automatic spray-coating of objects
WO1992014553A1 *Feb 5, 1992Sep 3, 1992Behr IndustrieanlagenAutomobile body spraying machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/323, 118/324
International ClassificationB05B13/02, B05B13/04
Cooperative ClassificationB05B13/0452
European ClassificationB05B13/04M2