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Publication numberUS2246660 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1941
Filing dateAug 11, 1938
Priority dateAug 11, 1938
Publication numberUS 2246660 A, US 2246660A, US-A-2246660, US2246660 A, US2246660A
InventorsBawtenheimer Reginald B
Original AssigneeBawtenheimer Reginald B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cornerpiece and the method of forming the same
US 2246660 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1941- R. B. BAWTENHEIMER ,660

CORNERPIEGE AND THE METHOD OF FORMING THE SAME Filed Aug. 11, 1938 INVENTOR. w ifzqmaw B. Bawrmuzmm forming the same.

part a continuation of my pending application,

Patented June 24, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CORNERPIECE AND THE METHOD OF FORMING THE SAME Reginald B. Bawtenheimer; Sarnia, Ontario,

' Uanada Application August 11, 1938, Serial No. 224,346

7 Claims.

My invention relates to a new and useful improvement in a corner piece and the method of This application forms in Serial No. 34,143, filed August 1, 1935, and the invention relates to construction in which a siding or covering is placed over buildings already constructed or in the course of construction to provide the outer face of the walls of the build- The invention is intended for use with a particular type of siding in which a supporting body is provided having secured .on the outer face thereof a plurality of design -forming strips or slabs generally arranged to simulate a brick formation. It is desirable that a building covered by such brick-simulating siding shall have the appearance from the exterior of a building constructed from ordinary brick in the usual manner. With some types of siding this simulation is achieved to a. marked degree excepting at the corners and the construction of the corners is such as to clearly indicate that the building is not of brick formation. This results from the nature of the siding and the method of application.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a comer piece which may be used with such siding and blended into the main body thereof in such a manner as to simulate perfectly a brick construction even at the corners thus affording a construction in which the sidingis raised to maximum efficiency and usefulness.

It is another object of the invention to provide a corner piece so constructed and arranged that the design-forming members mounted thereon shall correspond to the particular construction desired to be simulated.-

Another object of the invention is the provision of a method of formingcorner pieces of this type which will be simple, inexpensive and capable of producing a properly arranged and appearing corner piece, the various features of this method appearing more in detail in the description which follows.

The invention consists in the combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter described and claimed and in the method set forth.

The invention will be best understood by a reference to the accompanying drawing and the specification which follows of which the drawing forms a part.

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary, perspective view of a corner piece embodying the invention and formed according to the method forming a part of this invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary, perspective view of a panel showing its construction prior to the forming operation.

Fig. 3 is a slightly enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view indicating the construction of the line of bend on the panel.

Fig. 4 is an end elevational view illustrating the initial step in the forming operation.

Fig. 5 is an end elevational view illustrating a successive step in the forming operation.

Fig. 6 is a transverse, sectional view through a corner piece showing a further successive step in the forming operation.

Fig. 7 is a transverse, sectional view of a corner piece showing a further step in the forming operation.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view showing a heating element used in the invention.

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of a double corner piece or sill formed according to the invention.

Fig. 10'is a fragmentary, perspective view of a panel-from which the double corner piece may be formed.

Fig. 11 is an end elevational view illustrating the initial step of formation of the double corner piece.

The form shown in Fig 1 is used for a different purpose at a different location in the building than is the form shown in Fig. 9. This form shown in Fig. 9 has a double bend instead oi. a single bend as shown in Fig. 1 and lends itself admirably for use in sill formation. It may, however, be adapted for use in other locations and may properly be termed a corner piece. The material from which the structure shown in Fig. 1 is made is the same as the material from which the structure shown in Fig. 9 is made and the method of formation is substantially the same in both cases.

As shown in Fig. 2 and in Fig. 3, I provide a supporting body or panel l1 formed preferably. as shown in Fig. 3, from a plurality of layers I8 to provide a veneer construction. Pasted to the outer face of this panel or supporting board I1 is a plurality of omament-forming strips or slabs I9 formed from suitable flexible material andsecured to the outer face of the board ill by any suitable adhesive and preferably by asphalt which is liquefied for the purposes of securing the desired adhesiveness. The outer iace 20 of this board, which is the outer face of the sive which will provide the necessary adhering properties and at the same time provide the appearance desired. A notch 22 is formed on the inner face of the board and this notch 22 terminates inwardlyof the outer layer 2 I, the notch being formed along the line of desired bend. The angularity of the side faces of the notch will vary depending upon the bend of the panel as all corner pieces are not bent to a right angle but are bent to the angle of the wall surfaces to which they are to be applied, as for bay windows, alcoves, etc.

The inner face of the strips or tabs I9 is provided with a suitable adhesive, preferably a coating of liquefied asphalt, and secured to the outer face of these strips, by liquefied asphalt or other suitable adhesive, is preferably a sprinkling of colored granules 23 resembling in color the brick or building facing which it is desired to simulate. If desired, the granules may be dispensed with and the outer faces of said strips may be colored the desired color by pigment, or other suitable material. These strips or tabs I9 are placed in position to form the desired design and it will. be noted that these strips overlie the line of bend. The usual style of brick used in construction may be said roughly to be 2" by 4" by 8" and at the corners the end face appears alternately on the meeting walls, the brick terminating flush at one of its end faces with one of the walls and extending for its full length exposed in the other wall. Regardless of the size of the brick or block which is used for building purposes, this arrangement generally prevails so that an end face of one of the blocks in one layer is exposed in one wall at the corner and in the next adjacent layer the end face of a brick or block is exposed at the corner in the other wall and the construction is such that this end face bears a uniform proportion to the length of the brick or block.

In constructing a corner piece, therefore, it is necessary that this arrangement be simulated and to accomplish this it is necessary that the tab or strip I9 be located relatively to the line of bend so that it will project in one row the full length of the brick or block at one side of the bend and the depth of the block at the other side of the bend with the next adjacent row projecting oppositely with the long portion extending to the opposite side of the line of bend. Consequently, when the corner piece is formed as shown in Fig. 1, the desired effect referred to is obtained and a more perfect simulation of a brick or block construction thus obtained.

After the panel is formed as shown in Fig. 2, a layer of graphite or other suitable powder such as crushed slag is sprinkled over the entire outer surface of the panel for the purposes of producing the desired effect in appearance, this powder adhering to the mastic exposed at the mortar joint-s.

The notch having been formed with the proper angularity of the sides, the panel is then placed upon a suitable support and in the drawing I have illustrated a rod 24 projecting upwardly from a suitable support 25 enclosing an electric heating element connected to the terminals 26 and 21 to which the electric cables 28 and 29 may be attached. Since the rod 24 serves primarily as a heating agent and a self-bending support, it is believed that the description will indicate that the use of a suitable pipe, heated by steam or in any other manner, might be used equally well.

The panel 11 is placed in position with the support 24 engaging in the notch 22 and the member 24 heated. As this heat is transferred to the panel, it will serve to liquefy or soften the asphalt, pitch, tar, or the like with which the outer face of the panel is covered and which serves as the adhesive. It has been found that it is preferable to saturate the strips or tabs I9 in asphalt and when these strips or tabs are so saturated the heating will liquefy .the asphalt impregnated therein. As the heating operation proceeds, and the asphalt or other congealed material liquefies or softens, the panel will bend itself as shown in Fig. 5, the ends thereof moving downwardly as indicated.

When asphalt is used as the saturant and as the adhesive, the operator will recognize when the heating process has proceeded to a suflicient degree by noticing a slight bubbling of asphalt along the line of bend on the outer surface of the structure. If other types of adhesive and saturant are used, it is necessary that they be of a nature to congeal at ordinary temperatures and to liquefy or soften at raised temperatures. When the heating has progressed to the desired degree, the operator then places the panel over a suitable templet 30 having the faces 3I and 32 extended at the angle of the body about which the corner piece is to be mounted. The panel is then pressed firmly against the faces 3| and 32 to obtain the desired angle. It has been noted that in the heating operation, the tab or strip I9 tends to bulge away from the outer face of the panel at the line of bend as indicated at 33. This drawing exaggerates this outward bulging or withdrawing as in progress, the movement is not so great as indicated in Fig. 6. It is, however, of this general nature and in order that a proper sharp corner be provided the round curvature of the tab must be eliminated and to do this the operator presses, by means of a, plate or other suitable tool 34, against the tab to force it against one side of the corner piece and then against the other side so that a sharp corner is provided as shown in Fig. 7. The corner piece is then allowed to cool a short time during which the liquefied adhesive material congeals to secure the parts in their formed relation and prevent a spreading apart of the angularly directed portions of the panel IT. The structure is then placed in a trough having the inner face of its side walls directed at the angle at which the panel has been bent. Adhesive material, which may be liquefied asphalt, is then poured along the apex of the corner piece on the inner surface thereof so that a quantity 35 of adhesive material will engage between the faces of the notch 22 which are brought substantially into engagemeat with each other. A portion of this adhesive material will overlie this crevice and thus serve as an additional binder for retaining the corner piece fixed at the proper set or angle.

The corner piece may, of course, be made to any desired length or may be fabricated to a specific length. The panel, however, is of such construction that it may be cut to the desired length on the job, this cutting being effected after the corner piece has been formed as the corner piece is delivered to the job formed to the desired angularity.

It is believed obvious that the corner piece illustrated in Fig. 1 may be molded to the shape indicated in Fig. 1. If the corner piece were molded there would still be a supporting body having a. pair of angularly directed portions with the pattern-forming strips overlying and extended around the bend .to continue the pattern on the outer faces of eachof the angularly directed portions. It is theintention to bring within the scope of this application, the corner piece illustrated in Fig. 1 whether the particular method of manufacture set forth herein is followed or not as it is believed a novel and very useful construction is provided with the pattern-forming tabs mounted on the exposed faces and extended around the line of bend. It is believed obvious that, if desired, these pattern-forming strips may be mounted on the corner piece after the same has been constructed to the desired shape and angularity. If the pre-formed corner piece is used prior to the forming of the pattern-forming strips thereon, it is believed obvious that the pattern-forming strips might be either flexible and bent around the line of bend as being applied to the angularly directed portions or might be bent to the desired shape prior to aflixing.

In Fig. 9 I have illustrated a very similar type of construction excepting that the tabs l9 extend substantially from one end of the panel to the other'and the supporting panel I1 is provided with a pair of notches 22 formed on its inner face in spaced relation. In the bending operation, a pair of heating members 24 is provided each of these members engaging in one of the notches 22' and projecting upwardly from a suitable base 25' from which the heat may be transferred to the panel H. In this type of construction, the same sharp edges may be formed along the bends in the manner indicated and a very satisfactory construction is provided especially for use in simulating sills and similar bodies.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred forms of construction, I do not wish to limit myself to the precise details of structure shown, but desire to avail myself of such variations and modifications as may come within the scope of the appended claims.

What Iclaim as new is:

1. The method of forming a corner piece facing of theclass described, embodying a body bent to provide a pair of portions extending angularly to each other consisting in notching the inner face of said body through a portion of its depth along the line of desired bend, heating said body along said line of bend from the underside thereof for facilitating the bending thereof, and bending said body into the desired angularity along said line of bend.

2. The method of forming a corner piece facing of the class described, embodying a body bent to provide a pair of portions extending angularly to each other consisting in notching the inner face of said body through a. portion of its depth along the line of desired bend, heating said body along said line of bend for facilitating the bending thereof, and bending said body into the desired angularity along said line of bend and cementing said portions in the position at which bent.

3. The method of forming a corner piece facing of the class described from a supporting body having an impregnation of a saturant congealable at ordinary temperatures and flowable at a raised temperature consisting in grooving one face of said body along the line of bend, applying heat to said body along said groove sufliciently for effecting a softening of said saturant, bending said body to move the sides of said groove into approached relation and permitting said saturant, while said body is in bent condition, to congeal.

4. The method of forming a corner piece facing of the class described from a supporting body having an impegnation of a saturant congealable at ordinary temperatures and flowable at a raised temperature consisting in grooving one face of said body along the line of bend, applying heat to said body along said groove sumciently for effecting a softening of said saturant, bending said body to move the sides of said groove into'approached relation and permitting said saturant, while said body is in bent condition, to congeal and applying adhesive to said body in the crevice of the bend.

I 5. The method of forming a corner piece facing of the class described consisting in impregnating one face of a supporting body with a saturant flowable under heat and congealable at ordinary atmospheric temperatures, grooving said body along the opposite face at the desired line of bend, heating said body along said grooving sufficiently for effecting a softening of said saturant, bending said body on opposite sides of said groove to the desired degree of bend while said saturant is in a softened condition and permitting said saturant to congeal, while retaining said body in such bent position.

6. The method of forming a corner piece facing of the class described, comprising: a body having. one face impregnated with a saturant flowable under heat and congealable at ordinaryatmospheric temperatures and provided with a pluraiity of flexible blocksimulating tabs adhering thereto consisting in grooving the opposite face of, said body, applying heat along said groove 'su'illoiently for softening said saturant and bending said body along said groove while said saturant is in a softened condition to provide a 'pair of portions extending angularly to each other, pressing said tabs along said line of ,bend into close contact with said portions subsequentlyto the bending operation and permitting said saturant to congeal.

"7. The method of forming a corner piece facing of the fclass described, comprising: a body having one; face impregnated with a saturant flowableunder heat and congealable at ordinary atmospheric temperatures and provided with a plurality of flexible block-simulating tabs adhering thereto consisting in grooving the opposite face of said body, applying heat along said groove sufficiently for softening said saturant and bending said body along said groove while said saturant is in a softened condition to provide a pair of portions extending angularly to each other, pressing said tabs along said line of bend into close contact with said portions subsequently to the bending operation and permitting said saturant to congeal, and depositing an adhesive along the crevice of the line of said bend.

REGINALD B. BAwTENI-IEIMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2429192 *May 26, 1945Oct 14, 1947Eugene E ManceCorner unit and its manufacture
US3887101 *Jun 11, 1973Jun 3, 1975Pioneer Electronic CorpSpeaker box cabinet and method of manufacturing the same
US3969172 *May 22, 1975Jul 13, 1976Neumann Engraving Co.Method and apparatus for forming joints in thermoplastic strip
US4198455 *Dec 21, 1978Apr 15, 1980Pan American Gyro-Tex CorporationTrim and molding strip and the method of forming same
US4622090 *Oct 25, 1985Nov 11, 1986John MichaelsApparatus and method for grooving a laminate sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/211, D25/151, 52/275
International ClassificationE04F19/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04F19/024
European ClassificationE04F19/02B2