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Publication numberUS2246692 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1941
Filing dateAug 16, 1937
Priority dateAug 16, 1937
Publication numberUS 2246692 A, US 2246692A, US-A-2246692, US2246692 A, US2246692A
InventorsOhme Walter F
Original AssigneeOhme Walter F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag rack
US 2246692 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. F. OHME June 24, 1941.

BAG RACK 2 Sheets-Shet 1 Filed Aug. 16, 1937 WozHer" F. Ohme Patented June 24, 1941 UNITED STATES 1" OFFICE- BAG RACK Walter E. Ohrne, Minneapolis, Minn.

Application August 16, 1937, Serial No. 159,357

6 Claims. (Cl. 211---59) My invention relates to bag racks and has for an object to provide an extremely simple and practical construction for supporting bags such as candy and nut bags whereby the same may be readily available for inspection and dispensing.

Another object of the invention resides in providing a bag rack which may be constructed at a nominal cost and from ready available materials.

A feature of the invention resides in providing a bag rack that may be constructed from wire and sheet metal.

An object of the invention resides in providing a bag rack which may receive and support a great number of bags and which, at the same time, is sturdy in construction and stable.

Another object of the invention resides in constructing the bag rack with a number of standards to which a plurality of cross bars are attached and from which issue supporting arms upon which the bags may be hung.

Another object of the invention resides in constructing the standards and arms of wire and the cross bars of sheet metal, channel shaped in cross section.

Another feature of the invention resides in providing simple and inexpensive supporting means whereby the arms and standards may be held from rotation with reference to the'cross bars and from which the cross bars are supported at spaced elevation with reference to the standards.

Another object of the invention resides in providing a readily collapsible bag rack.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, which will appear in the following description, the invention resides in the novel combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter illustrated and/or described.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a bag rack illustrating an embodiment of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of one of the rack sections removed from the supporting standards.

Fig. 3 is an elevationa1 view of one of the standards.

Fig. 4 is a detailed sectional view taken on line t-t of Fig. 3 and showing the parts disconnected from one another.

Fig. dis a detailed perspective View of the end of the upper cross bar and associated structures showing the manner of connecting the various parts thereto. l

Fig. 6 is a vertical cross sectional view taken on line iii of Fig. 5.

My invention, as shown in the drawings, comprises three standards or supports Ill, II and [2 which support two rack sections l3 and I4. These various parts will now be described in detail.

The standards iii, H and i2 are identical in construction and only the standard Ill, which is shown in Fig. 3, will be described in detail. This standard is constructed from round wire which is bent to form base 2!]. The base 20 consists of a foot l5 and two legs l6 and I1 issuing upwardly therefrom. The foot 15 is humped at the middle as designated at it to cause the said foot to set squarely on the table or other support on which the standards rest. The two legs 16 and I! converge toward their upper ends. Issuing upwardly from the leg it is an upright 19 which is of the proper height to support the rack section 13 in proper elevation above the rack section l4. At the upper end of leg I"! the same is constructed with a bent portion 2| which extends toward the upright 19 and is formed. with a horizontal upper surface 22 forming a rest or a shoulder on which the rack section M is supported. The extreme end of the portion 2! is constructed with an arcuate notch 23 shown in detail in Figure 4 which fits against the upright It. The legs Hi and ll are normally bent beyond their final positions so that the notch 23 is urged into engagement with the upright 19 through the spring action of the base 26. At the upper end of the upright It the standard E2 is cut away as indicated at 23 and 24 to form a non-circular portion 25 having upwardly facing shoulders 26.

The rack section i3 consists of a cross bar 21 U shaped or channel shaped in cross section which is constructed with a web 28 and upper and lower flanges 3i and 32 issuing outwardly therefrom. When the parts are arranged in operating position the two flanges 3i and 32 lie horizontally. At suitable localities in the flange 32 are formed circular holes 33 which receive the uprights IQ of standards it), II and E2. Superimposing the holes 33 and in the flange 3! are other holes 34 which correspond in configuration to the portions 25 of the uprights L9. The portions 25 are received in these holes and the flange 3| rests on the shoulders 26 whereby the cross bar it is held in position at the upper portion of the standards. By constructing the holes 34 and the portions 25 non-circular rotation of the standards with reference to the rack section I3 is prevented.

The rack section 53 includes a number of arms 35 which are identical in construction and which project outwardly therefrom and form supports for the bags to be carried by the rack. These arms are constructed from wire and each have an elongated substantially horizontally positioned body portion 36, an upturned tip 3? at its outer free end and a depending substantially vertically extended shank 3'! at its attached end. These shanks extend through the flanges 3i and 32 of the cross bar 2i in much the same manner as the uprights I9 of standards it, H and I2. The upper-most portions of these shanks are received in circular holes 38 in the flange El while the lower ends of said shanks are constructed with non-circular portions 39 which are received in non-circular openings M formed in the lower flange 32 of the cross bar 2?. The portions 39 are slightly 1onger than the thickness of the material through which they extend and are riveted over as shown in 42 in Fig. 6. By means of this construction the arms 35 are securely attached to the cross bar 21 and are held from rotation with respect to the same.

The rack section 14 is constructed identical with rack section 13 excepting that the upper openings in the flange 3! thereof for the reception of uprights [9 are circular so that the cross bar 27 of this rack section slides down upon the upright l9 and rests upon the surface 22 of the portion 2! forming the seat previously referred to. Since the construction of this rack section is otherwise identical with section l3 the description thereof will not be repeated and similar reference numeral preceded by the digit I will be used to indicate corresponding parts.

The use of the invention is as follows:

The rack sections are normally detached from the standards and the parts easily pack in a small box or in an envelope. When desired for use the uprights IQ of the standards are threaded through the circular holes of the cross bar I 21 of rack section It and the cross bar slid along these uprights until the same becomes seated on the rests 22. These parts are then selfsupporting. Rack section 13 is next applied in a similar manner and the standards Ill, II and I2 rotated until the non-circular portions 25 of the uprights it are received within the noncircular holes 36. As soon as the flanges 3| rest upon the shoulders 26 the parts are properly assembled. The rack is now placed upon the table, counter or other support on which same is to remain and bags of merchandise, such as candy, nuts, etc., are hooked on the various arms 35. In Fig. 1 I have shown two such bags indicated at 3! and 48 which are constructed with eyes or openings 49 near the upper-most margins thereof. These bags are applied in such a manner that the arms 35 are received in the eyes or openings id. The bags are then slid along said arms until the same reach the cross bars of the rack sections. The rack may thus be completely filled with bags.

By means of the invention a great number of bags may be supported on a relatively small light and inexpensive rack and are readily accessible for dispensing or otherwise.

Although I have specified my bag holder to be particularly adapted for supporting bags, it readily can be comprehended that the device may be used for any other article which can be hung on the arms provided.

In the drawings, I have shown the rack as constructed with two rack sections and with three standards. It can readily be comprehended that any number of standards in excess of one may be used and that the rack may also be constructed with only one rack section. Also the supporting arms may be extended in either or both directions if desired.

The advantages of my invention are manifest. An extremely inexpensive and simple construction is provided whereby bags may be readily and conveniently displayed. The parts of my invention are collapsible and may be packed for shipment in a flat and compact state. My improved bag holder will support an exceedingly great number of articles. The parts are readily erected when the device is desired for use. By means of the particular construction shown, both the standards and supporting arms can be constructed of Wire and rigidly attached to the associated parts.

Changes in the specific form of my invention, as herein disclosed, may be made Within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent 1. A bag rack comprising a plurality of standards each constructed from wire and bent to form a triangular base having a foot and legs extending upwardly therefrom in converging relation, an upright extending upwardly from one of said legs and bag supporting means carried by said uprights.

2. A bag rack comprising a plurality of standards each constructed from wire and bent to form a triangular base having a foot and legs extending upwardly therefrom in converging relation, an upright extending upwardly from one of said legs, the other of said legs having its end bent toward the first named leg and upright to form a shoulder, and bag supporting means attached to said uprights and resting upon said shoulders.

3. A bag rack comprising a plurality of standards each constructed with a base and an upright connected thereto, said standards each being provided at a locality above said base with an upwardly facing shoulder projecting outwardly from said upright and bag supporting means attached to said uprights and resting upon said shoulders.

4. A bag rack comprising a plurality of standards each constructed of round wire bent to form a triangular base having a foot and legs extending upwardly therefrom in converging relation, an upright issuing upwardly from one of said legs, a finger extending from the other of said legs toward said upright said finger forming a rest and having a notched end adapted to engage said upright for holding the legs of said base in proper relation and bag supporting means carried by said uprights and seated on said rests.

5. A bag rack comprising a plurality of standards each having a base and a cylindrical upright extending upwardly therefrom, rests formed on said standards intermediate the heights thereof, a cross bar having circular holes receiving said uprights said cross bar being seated on said rests, noncircular portions formed at the upper ends of said uprights and providing shoulders, a second cross bar having circvlar holes to receive said uprights and being provided with non-circular holes engaging the non-circular portions of said uprights and holding said standards from rotationrelative to said cross bars and bag supporting means attached to said cross bars.

6. A bag rack comprising a plurality of standards constructed of cylindrical wire each provided with a base portion having a foot and legs bent therefrom and converging toward one another, an upright issuing upwardly from one of said legs, the end of the other of said legs being bent toward the upright to form a rest, a cross bar having cylindrical holes therein

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2626711 *Dec 6, 1948Jan 27, 1953SaulAdjustable peg rack
US2802576 *Jun 17, 1955Aug 13, 1957Kelling Nut CoDisplay rack
US2942832 *Aug 12, 1957Jun 28, 1960O P Link Handle Company IncDisplay means for tool handles
US3139985 *Mar 7, 1962Jul 7, 1964Gillette CoPanel display rack
US3567036 *Mar 6, 1969Mar 2, 1971Hormel & Co Geo AReseal product display rack
US3650408 *Oct 6, 1969Mar 21, 1972Goodman & Sons Inc HDisplay apparatus
US4049125 *Jul 27, 1976Sep 20, 1977Royal Engineering CompanyCarpet sample display apparatus
US5295588 *Mar 25, 1993Mar 22, 1994Neirinckx Thomas RDisplay rack for caps
US6702126 *Feb 1, 2002Mar 9, 2004Park Ran-KiuDisplay rack stand for hairbrush
US7040492 *Jul 2, 2003May 9, 2006Sara Lee CorporationDisplay adapter system
US20130295258 *Jul 12, 2013Nov 7, 2013Konrad GlasDevice for holding a number of fish to be prepared and fish preparation method
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/59.1, 211/206
International ClassificationA47F13/08, A47F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/0876
European ClassificationA47F5/08D