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Publication numberUS2247566 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1941
Filing dateSep 29, 1938
Priority dateSep 29, 1938
Publication numberUS 2247566 A, US 2247566A, US-A-2247566, US2247566 A, US2247566A
InventorsWalton David H
Original AssigneeWalton David H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid trap for storage tanks
US 2247566 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 1941.

D. H. WALTON FLUID TRAP FOR STORAGE TANKS Filed sept, 29, 193s e e 7% d. ,29. 5

Patented July 1, 1941 UNl TED STAT ES PAT EN T @2F F E 'FLUID TRAP FOR STORAGE TANKS David H. Walton, Hobbs, N. Mex.

Application September 29, 1938, Serial No. 232,285

2 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in fluid traps for storage tanks.

One object `of theinvention is to provide `an improved device generally known as a gas trap and particularly adapted for ,use with` liquid storage tanks, which is arranged to maintain a desired vapor pressure within the interior of the tank, whereby .evaporation of the liquid within the tank is retarded.

An important yobject of the invention is to provide an improved device which is mounted in the top of a liquid storage tank and which is .construct-ed to permit escape of vapors from the tank when the vapor pressure exceeds a predetermined point; the device also permitting admission of air into the tank in the event the pressure therein falls 'below a predetermined point, whereby danger of damage .to the tank oy excessive pressure or by a lack of pressure, is obviated.

A particular object of the invention is to provide an improved device, of the character described, wherein .a liquid seal is employed to control. the escape of vapors from 'the tank and the admission of air to the tank, said device being simple and inexpensive in construction ,and relatively short, whereby Ithe usual elongate vent pipe is eliminated; the liquid seal also preventing damage to the tank due to flash back caused by lightning, sparks or fire.

Still another object of .the invention is to provide an improved device for controlling the escape and admission of uid to a liquid storage tank, wherein a U-'tube having liquid therein is employed, said tube having an upwardly extending extension through which the vaporous .iiuids or gases from the tank pass, the extension being constructed so as to permit expansion of said fluid, whereby the velocity thereof is decreased and separation of said gas from any liquid in solution therewith, is promoted; the extension also having means therein for further promoting separation of the gas and liquid, whereby escape of any liquid is substantially eliminated.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features of the invention.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawing, in which an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

Figure 1 is an elevation of -the upper portion of a liquid storage tank, having a gas trap, constructed in accordance with the invention, applied thereto,

Figure 2 is an enlarged view. partly in elevation and partly in section, of the trap,

Figure 3 is a plan view thereof,

Figure 4 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view, taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 2, and

'Figure 5 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 5 5 of Figure 2.

ln the drawing, the numeral I9 .designates a liquid storage tank of the usual construction, such as is used for storing oil, or other hydrocarbon liquids. The tank has the usual conical top I2 which has a gas or vapor outlet .opening I3 disposed axially therein. A vertically extending outlet pipe I4 has its lower end secured in the opening I3 and ordinarily an elongate verticaly vent tube (not shown) is connected to the upper end Vof said pipe I4.

In ycarrying out the present invention, a laterally extending line I5 has one end connected to `the upper end of the outlet pipe by means of an elbow i6. The opposite end of the line I5 is connected with the inlet ofa U-shaped housing or casing .I'I. VAs clearly shown in Figure `2, the housing includes a relatively short vertical portion I'Ela which has the lateral inlet made integral with its upper end. The lower end of the portion is bent at substantially a right angle to provide a connecting duct 'IB and is then directed upwardly to provide an elongate extension i9. The extension is flared or enlarged outwardly toward 'its upper end which is open and this open upper end has a cap member or hood 2II mounted thereabove. The hood does not close this upper end .but prevents foreign and extraneous matter from falling into the extension. The portion Ha, duct I8 and extension "i9 may be of any desired cross-sectional shape but have been shown as cylindrical.

The interior of `the vertical portion I'Ia forms a chamber A, while the interior of the extension 'I9 forms a chamber B, said chambers being connected at `their lower ends by `the lateral duct I8, whereby `a U-tube effect may be had, as will be explained. Since the housing l1 is connected with the outlet pipe I4 lin the top oi the tank Il), it is obvious that gas or vapors from the tank may pass through the chambers A and B of the housing and escape to atmosphere from the open top of the extension I9, said vapors or gas passing outwardly beneath the hood 263. Similarly, air may enter the upper end of the chamber B and pass through rthe duct i8, chamber A, pipes I6 and i4 and into the tank.

For controlling the flow of fluid through the chambers A and B, a suitable liquid is introduced into the chambers A and B, through an opening provided for the purpose in the top of the chamber A. This opening is normally plugged by a plug 2l threaded into said opening. The liquid introduced into the chamber A will flow through the duct I8 into the chamber B and said liquid will nd its level in the chambers, whereby Ysaid level is the same in both chambers, as indicated vbv dotted lines in Figure 2. The amount of liquid introduced is dependent upon the amount of vapor pressure to be maintained in the tank Hl and a gage glass 22 is mounted in the side of the chamber A to indicate the liquid level in the chambers.

With the liquid within the lower ends of the chambers A Aand B, gas or vapors from within the tank `cannot pass -outwardly vthrough the chambers without bubbling through said liquid,

and similarly, air cannot enter the tank and thus the liquid in said chambers forms a seal. Assuming that the vapor pressure in the tank builds up, it will be manifest that such pressure is acting against the top of the liquid column in the chamber A. When this pressure builds up to a point sufficient to overcome the weight of the liquid column in the chamber B, the column in the chamber A is forced downwardly which raises staggered rel-ation within the interior of the chamber B. As the gas strikes the baiiles, any liquid particles picked up by said gas in its travel through the liquid are knocked out and separated therefrom. Also, since the chamber flares outwardly toward its upper end,the gas is permitted to expand during its upward travel and such eX- pansion decreases the velocity of the gas and further promotes separation of the gas and liquid.

' The liquid whichis separated from the gas during its upward travel inthe chamber B `Vfalls downwardly onto the inclined baiiles and flows down- V wardly on the surface thereof by gravity. This liquid escapes back to the lower end of the chamber B through openings 24 provided in the lower ends of the baiies. Y e

The gas escaping from the chamber and passing outwardly from beneath the hood is relatively free from liquid and escapes to atmosphere. As the gas or vapor escapes from the tank it,

the pressure within the tank is lowered and when such pressure falls below-a predetermined point, as determined by the amountrof liquid in the chambers, the liquid will lautomatically seek its own level in the chambers and will thus seal the gas outlet. Further, gas or vapor cannot escape from the tank until the'pressure within the tank again builds up beyond the necessary predetermined point;` Y

In the event that liquid is rapidly drawn from the storage tank, the pressure within the tank will drop and a partial vacuum may occur in said tank.V When such condition arises,the atmospheric pressure which is acting downwardly on the column ofv liquid in the chamber B forces said column downwardly until the level in said chamber is below the top of the connecting duct I8. Air may Ythen bubble upwardly through the liquid in the chamber A and then pass into the tank IU through the pipes I6 andV I4. When the pressure within the tank again equals or exceeds atmospheric, the liquid in the chambers A and B again seeks its level andV remains so until an unbalanced condition again occurs.

From the above, it will be seen that an eilicient control of .the escape and admission of fluid to a storage tank is provided. The pressure at which the device operates to permit passage of fluid is dependent upon the amount of liquid within the chambers A and B and, by varying the volume of liquid, operation at different pressures may be had. 'Ihe construction is simple and inexpensive and its use eliminates the usual tall vent pipe. For draining the liquid from the chambers A and B, a suitable drain lcock 25 is mounted in the bottom of the duct I8.

It is noted that the device has been illustrated as applied to a standard storage tank but it may be employed with other units, wherein automatic relief of vapor pressure is necessary. Although the housing is shown as made in one piece, it could be constructed Yof several sections suitably connected together. The kflaring or enlarging of the outlet extension I9 or chamber B is a feature of the invention as it allows the gas or vapor to expand prior to its escape, whereby separation of the gas and any liquid admixed therewith is greatly enhanced. l

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materiala'as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made,

within the scope of the appended claims, withoutV departing from the spirit of Vthe invention.V

` What I claim `and desire to secure by Letters Y Patent is:

1. A gas trap including, a one piece housing angular in cross-section having an upright chamber connected with -a fluid line and having a second upright chamber which has its lower end communicating with the lower end of the i'lrst chamber, the chambers being adapted to receive a liquid which nds its level in the chambers to act as a seal to prevent passage of iiuid through the housing, the second chamber being of aV larger cross-sectional area than the rst chamber and being flared toward its'upper end which is' open to atmosphere,l and a plurality of baffles secured to the inner Wall of the second chamber and extending inwardly toward the center thereof, said baiiles having their inner ends in clined upwardly soV as to conduct liquids falling thereon toward the wall of the chamber and away from the center thereof.

2. A gas trap including, a one piece housing, v

angular in cross-section having an upright chamber connected `with a fluid line and having aV second upright chamberrwhich has its lower end communicating with the lower end of the first chamber, the chambers being adapted to receive a liquid which nds its level in the chambers to act as a seal toI prevent passage of iiuid through the-housing, the second chamber being of a larger cross-sectional area than the first `chamber and ybeing flared toward. its upper endy of the chamber for permitting any liquid flowing downwardly along the baiile to travel downwardly along the wall of the chamber, the rst chamber having a normally closed liquid inlet in its top and a valve controlled discharge at its lower portion. g, y

DAVID H. .WALTONv

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2702592 *Jan 18, 1952Feb 22, 1955Standard Oil Dev CoJet aircraft fuel system
US2827071 *Sep 30, 1954Mar 18, 1958Sellers Injector CorpLiquid seal breather valve vent
US2834360 *Apr 23, 1956May 13, 1958Arkla Air Conditioning CorpHeat operated apparatus
US4168958 *Feb 8, 1978Sep 25, 1979Hartman Eugene WSmoke stack air washer
US4175937 *Oct 20, 1977Nov 27, 1979Deere & CompanyGas-contaminant separator
US4815286 *Nov 2, 1987Mar 28, 1989Tohoku Electric Power Company, IncorporatedAir flow check valve and system incorporating the same
US4840192 *May 5, 1986Jun 20, 1989Yandle Ii Sylvester EHydraulic hammer reduction system for railroad tank cars
US4938247 *Jun 20, 1989Jul 3, 1990Yandle Ii S EHydraulic hammer reduction system for railroad tank cars
US5882386 *Oct 10, 1997Mar 16, 1999Aim Aviation, Inc.Device for separating moisture from gas vented from an aircraft
US6562106Aug 8, 2001May 13, 2003Life Line Water Co., LlcAtmosphere treatment device for sealed containers
US7044327 *Jun 17, 2004May 16, 2006Vaitses Stephen PSystem and method for tank pressure compensation
US7625459 *Jun 30, 2006Dec 1, 2009Sunbeam Products, Inc.Method for manufacturing liquid-trapping bag for use in vacuum packaging
US7654410 *Jan 31, 2006Feb 2, 2010Nissan Technical Center North America, Inc.Vehicle reservoir tank
US7678272 *Dec 28, 2006Mar 16, 2010Hemerus Medical, LlcBiological fluid filtration system and biological fluid filter used therein
US8783280 *Jul 19, 2012Jul 22, 2014Elwood Yandle II S.Modular hydraulic hammer reduction system for railroad tank cars
US9415249 *Aug 24, 2011Aug 16, 2016Rembe Gmbh Safety+ControlDevice for protecting a container or a conduit from an explosion
US20050199294 *Jun 17, 2004Sep 15, 2005Vaitses Stephen P.System and method for tank pressure compensation
US20060243386 *Jun 30, 2006Nov 2, 2006Tilia International, Inc.Method for manufacturing liquid-trapping bag for use in vacuum packaging
US20070102345 *Dec 28, 2006May 10, 2007Majid ZiaBiological fluid filtration system and biological fluid filter used therein
US20070175418 *Jan 31, 2006Aug 2, 2007Nissan Technical Center North America, Inc.Vehicle reservoir tank
US20120048575 *Aug 24, 2011Mar 1, 2012Rembe Gmbh Safety+ControlDevice for Protecting a Container or a Conduit From an Explosion
US20130019981 *Jul 19, 2012Jan 24, 2013E. Yandle II S.Modular hydraulic hammer reduction system for railroad tank cars
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/254, 55/446, 96/358, 220/748, 220/747
International ClassificationA62C4/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C4/00
European ClassificationA62C4/00