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Publication numberUS2248925 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1941
Filing dateMar 29, 1939
Priority dateMar 29, 1939
Publication numberUS 2248925 A, US 2248925A, US-A-2248925, US2248925 A, US2248925A
InventorsBert H Lincoln, Waldo L Steiner
Original AssigneeJohn W Wolfe, Lubri Zol Dev Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lubricating oil
US 2248925 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented July 15, 1941 2,248,925 LUBRICATING 01L Bert H. Lincoln and Waldo L. Steiner, Ponca City, and Alfred. Henriksen, deceased, late of Ponca. City, Okla., by John W. Wolfe, administrator, Ponca City, Okla., assignors, by mesne assignments, to The Lubri-Zol Development Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of ware Dela- Q No Drawing. Application March 29, 1939, Serial No. 264,848

10 Claims.

This invention relates, as indicated, to lubrieating compositions and more particularly to lubricants adapted to be employed under conditions of extreme pressure and high temperatures.

This application is a continuation-impart of our copending application Serial No. 63,916, filed.

February 14, 1936.

With the development of extreme pressure lubricating compositions for use in internal combustion engines and the like, there has arisen a demand for a lubricant capable of preventing seizure and scoring of the relatively moving metalli'c surfaces under conditions of extreme pressure and which also are stable to high temperatures, resisting any tendency to decompose to more chemically active compounds which may attack the parts lubricated.

It is, therefore, an object of our invention to provide an extreme pressure lubricating composition of excellent stability at high operating temperatures.

Other objects will appear as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

The following description sets forth in detail certain approved combinations of ingredients embodying my invention, such disclosed means constituting, however, but one of various forms in which the principle of the invention may be used.

Broadly stated, our invention comprises a lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and a minor amount of a halogen-bearing aromatic amine.

While the halogen-bearing aromatic amines may be employed in varying amounts depending on the use for which the lubricating composition is designed, the halogen content of the addition agent, etc., the usual preferred concentration ranges between .01% to about 2.0% or slightly higher, by weight, based on the amount of lubricating oil. For certain uses as much as or may prove advantageous but generally a lesser amount will be found sufflcient.

The halogen content of the addition agent may be as low as 4 or 5% by weight for the very high molecular weight aromatic amines and as high as about 40 or 50% for the low molecular weight aromatic amines. From about 10 to 30% halogen content is generally ideal.

Since, in general, the loss of the addition agent by volatilization will be less for compounds having a low volatility, the vapor pressure of the compounds should, for most purposes, be less than atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 140 C. It is usually desirable, especially for use in internal combustion engines, that the vapor pressure be less than atmospheric at temperatures up to 170 C. In the case of compounds which are stable at temperatures up to their boiling points, this condition may be expressed by stating that the boiling point of the compound should, in general, be higher than 0., and for certain uses, such as in internal combustion engines, higher than C.

Furthermore, since the addition agents of the present invention are primarily intended for use where high operating temperatures may be encountered, a preferred class is that in which the compounds have boiling points above 200 C.

Orthochloro aniline is an excellent example of such an addition agent.

The following list of halogen-bearing aromatic amines illustrates the type of addition agent contemplated by the present invention, but it is, of course, to be understood that the scope of the invention is in no Way intended to be limited to such compounds:

I. Primary amines:

A. Monocyclic 1. O-Chloroaniline P-Chloro-o-toluidine Chloroxylidine Bromomesidine P-Chlorobenzylamine Alpha-chlorothymylamine l chloro-2-aminocetylebenzene 8. O Chlorotoluylenediamine 9. P-Nitro-o-chloroaniline QQUIQOON 10. O-Chloro-p-aminophenol 11. P Chlorophenylenediamine B. Bicyclic 12. 2' chloro-2-cyclohexylani- III. Tertiary amines:

A. Monocyclic 26. O-Chloro-dimethylaniline. 27. P-Chloro-di-isobutylaniline 28. 4-chloro-2-pheny1-1 amyla- 33. 4-chloro-triphenylamine 34. 4 chloro methylphenyl 1- naphthylamine 35. 4,4 dichlorodiphenylcyclohexylamine While all four halogens are efiective as components of our new addition agent, chlorine is the one most generally employed since it is both inexpensive and readily available. Bromine and fluorine may also be employed and are more readily available than in the past. Iodine is efiective but relatively expensive.

The lubricating oil employed as a base is generally mineral oil but it is to be understood that any other suitable lubricating oil, whether naturally occurring or synthetic, may be employed as the oil base.

Included among such various types of oils are hydrogenated and volatilized oils, and animal, vegetable, fish and shale oils of lubricating viscosity.

It is also Within the contemplation of this invention to employ the addition agent in the form of a concentrate in any suitable oil, to be later blended with a lubricating oil to form the final composition.

As exemplifying the stability of the compositions of this invention the following test may be given: A blend of a good grade of hydrocarbon oil and one percent of orthochloro aniline was prepared, the film strength of which was found to be almost five times as great as that of the plain hydrocarbon oil. The blend was held at a temperature of between 230 and 240 F. for several days without any change being found in its chemical composition.

It has also been found that the extreme pressure addition agents of this invention are not appreciably chemically active towards the newer bearing metals, such as lead and cadmium alloys, and hence, are suitable for a wide range of uses.

Other advantages of the halogenated aromaticamines are their effectiveness in very small proportions, their lack of objectionable odor, and their relatively low cost. A tendency to inhibit the formation of insoluble carbonaceous sludges under certain conditions has also been noted, probably due to an anti-oxidant efiect which also affords some anti-corrosion protection.

Other modes of applying the principle of our invention may be employed instead of the one explained, change being made as regards the materials employed, provided the ingredients stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated ingredients be employed.

We, therefore, particularly point out and distinctly claim as our invention:

1. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and a minor amount of a halogen-bearing aromatic amine.

2. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 10% of a halogen-bearing aromatic amine.

3. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and a minor amount of a chlorine-bearing aromatic amine.

4. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 10% of a chlorine-bearing aromatic amine.

5. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 2% of a halogen-bearing aromatic amine.

6. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 2% of a chlorine-bearing aromatic amine.

7. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 10% of orthochloroaniline.

8. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 10% of chloromethylaniline.

9. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of lubricating oil and from about .01% to about 10% of chlorotriphenylamine.

10. A lubricating composition comprising a major proportion of mineral oil and from about .01% to about 2% of a chlorine-bearing aromatic amine having a vapor pressure less than atmospheric at 170 C. and a chlorine content of from about 10% to aobut 30%.

BERT H. LINCOLN. WALDO L. STEINER. JOHN W. WOLFE, Administrator de boms non of the Estate of Alfred Henriksen, Deceased.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2967125 *Oct 13, 1958Jan 3, 1961Velsicol Chemical CorpPhenylcyclopentylamine fungicides
US3037058 *Dec 2, 1959May 29, 1962Diamond Alkali Co2, 4, 5-trichlorophenyl-hydroxylamine
US3714046 *Mar 19, 1971Jan 30, 1973Millmaster Onyx CorpMetal-working fluid containing a 2,4,5-trichloroaniline derivative as a microbiocide
US4036770 *Oct 17, 1975Jul 19, 1977Mobil Oil CorporationStabilization of hydrocracked oils with amino nitrophenols
US4125668 *Aug 15, 1977Nov 14, 1978Ball Brothers Research CorporationLubricants comprising dialkanolamine derivatives
Classifications
U.S. Classification508/563, 236/68.00B, 252/401
Cooperative ClassificationC10M2215/062, C10M2215/04, C10M2215/26, C10M2215/044, C10N2270/02, C10M2207/404, C10M2203/10, C10M2215/06, C10M2215/064, C10M2207/40, C10M1/08, C10M2215/066
European ClassificationC10M1/08