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Publication numberUS2249118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1941
Filing dateJan 7, 1938
Priority dateJan 7, 1938
Publication numberUS 2249118 A, US 2249118A, US-A-2249118, US2249118 A, US2249118A
InventorsDe Witt Francis
Original AssigneePervel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Impregnated paper
US 2249118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

in either a wet or. dry

v made from textile fabrics,

quality of the flbre coating acterized by softness,

I Patented July 15, 1941 'oFFlC-E 'IMPREGNATED Parse Francis De Witt, New York, N; Pervel Corporation, New York,

. ration ofDelaware No Drawing. Application January Serial N0. 183,800

\ '1 Claims; (01. 91-68) I produce articles of This invention-relates to paper and paper manufactures, and particularly relates to papers which are characterized used in. the manufacture of goods commonly such as, for example, table linens, sheets, pillow cases, handkerchiefs, towels. and other hospital and home supplies.

- Papers have been developed recently which are characterized, by toughness, durability and water-repellent powers. These papers have about equal durability and toughness in a wet or a dry condition, due to treatment which coats the'individual cellulose fibres with a water-repellent and adhesive material. The adhesive fibres together and the water-repellent action prevents disintegration or separation of the 'Papers of this type, while satisfactory for many purposes, are characterized by a dry, harsh texture which renders them unsuitable for many purposes, such as substitutes for textiles. Furthermore, these papers may be crumpled and creased and thereafter cannot be returned to a smooth,- unwrinkled It has been suggested that other types of paper may be treated or impregnated with glycerine to render them softer and less harsh andto overcome the undesirable characteristic of being easily crumpled and crea d, but while glycerine can temporarily soften the material, it is -hygroscopic and withdraws moisture from the air, rendering the paper undesirably dampand weak. Furthermore, if the glycerine treated paper is placed in water, the glycerine is dissolved and upon drying" the soft texture and flexibility of the paper is lost. Theglycerine by evaporation if the paper heated atmosphere and will be withdrawn at least partially from the paper if it comes in contact with other absorbent materials.

The principal object of this invention is to produce a paper which is soft, flexible and durable, either in the manufacture of textile fabrics.

may be lost. also. is stored in a dry,

of articles commonly made by excellent durability condition, and may bebinds the individual wet or d y. and which may be used Another object of the invention is to produce paper and paper manufactures which remain soft and strong in a wet or dry condition.

Another object of the invention is to produce paper and paper manufactures whichare char- DOIOEi Y. absorption, and are strong when wet, have drapability, and can be out and sewn like cloth.

An' additional object of the invention is to factory for use as fillers.

Y assignor to NI'Y, a mo! handled similarly to Other objects will embodiments of the invention are described hereinafter;

The objects of the tained through the use of a novel sizing material the textile articles.

which forms the subject matter of my copending hydroxy alcohols, such as ethylene glycol, di-- ethylene glycol, and mono-ethyl ether of ethylene or diethylene glycol, dissolved'in water, and a water insoluble mineral filler. The filler material preferably is a white pulverulent powder in order that thepaper will not be discolored thereby.- It will be understood, of course, that colored flllers'ma'ybe used when colored papers areto be produced.-

The function of the filler is to flx or anchor the softeningag'ent in the paper so that moisture will not dissolve or dryand heated atmosphere will not evaporate the softening'agent and 1 leave the paper in the stiff! and harsh condition which normally characterizes papers having considerable mechanical strength. The filler materiais hereinafter described apparently act as adsorbents to retain the softening agent in the paper and distribute it throughout the paper. The filler distributes itself throughout the flbres of the paper and adheres thereto with suihcient tenacity to resist removal Typical fillers which, have, in actualpractice been found entirely satisfactory, are water insoluble mineral fillers, such as, for example, calcium, magnesium, and aluminum oxides and salts, The silicates, carbons sulfates and fluorides of calcium and magnesium and aluminum silicates, such as, for example, kaolin, fullers earth andpumice are.particularly satis- Some of'these fillers have been used heretofore in making high grade coated papers, but their ability to act as an admanufacture from paper which have the texture and flexibility of similar textile articles andwhich may he moistened and become apparent as typical invention have been ,at-

Schur', No.

by wetting or washing.

, preferably applied agent has not plication 'of the sizing composition to the paper the bath should be agitated to prevent the filler from settling out.

Typical sizing compositions may contain the following constituents:

Example I Glycerine fluid ounces 28 (70%) denatured alcohol ..do 28 Water do '72 Magnesium silicate ounces-- 14 These quantities "are purely illustrative and may be varied in accordance with the quantity of sizing composition desired. While the above example includes magnesium silicate as the filler, other water insoluble mineral flllers, such as magnesium fluoride, magnesium oxide, pumice,

calcium carbonate, calcium silicylate, calcium sulfate, or mixtures of the samemay be substituted therefor. Another suitable composition may consist of:

Example If Glycerine fluid ounces" 28 Water do 80 Magnesium silicate ounces.. 16

In this composition, also, the magnesium silicate may be mixed with or replaced by suitable water insoluble mineral flllers of the general type set forth above.

In each of the above examples the quantities of alcohol, water, glycerine, and flller may be varied within somewhat wide limits without losand bath) handkerchiefs, dresses, sport hats, shower curtains and window drapes.

'These articles may be either white or colored and inthe case of hospital supplies, may be sterilized and packaged in a sterile condition inasmuch as the ingredients used are not incompatible with surgical or other medicinal uses.

Pillow cases made from these papers are particularly suitable for use by individuals suffering from allergies such as hay fever. The paper is impervious to dust and the pillow dust is therefore prevented from escaping from the pillows.

It will be seen that papers embodying this invention have many novel uses and characteristics not found in papers of the types heretofore known.

It should be understood that the examples of the sizing compositions set forth above are illustrative only and therefore should not be considered as limiting the scope" of the following claims.

' said softening agent and. filler being present in ing the valuable paper softening and flexibility producing characteristics.

Ordinary papers may be treated with the sizing or impregnating composition to render paper soft and flexible. This type of paper is inexpensive, has good adsorbent properties and may be used for many purposes when "wet' strength is not important.

The-use of "wet strength paper, with the sizing composition produces a linen-like paper which cuts and sews like cloth, is as flexible or drapable as cloth, and is an excellentsubstitute for cloth inthe production of many articles which normally are intended to be used several times, wetted several times, and thereafter disposed of. The presence of the softening agent renders the paper so flexible and soft that it may be crumpled or crushed and thereafter smoothed out without visible creases or bendin marks remaining. This characteristic, as well as pleasant soft texture are retained throughout the life of the paper.

Examples of the many uses to which this paper, economically and satisfactorily, can be put, are as follows:

Bed sheets and pillow cases, dentists bibs, doctors coats and covers, table linen, diapers, costumes and draperies for theatres, towels (dish I claim:

ing agent and a water-insoluble filler capable of adsorbing and retaining the softening agent in the paper, said softening agent and flller being present in the ratio of about 14 to 16 ounces of filler to about 28 fluid ounces of softening agent.

2. An article of manufacture, comprising paper having substantially the same mechanical strength whether wet or dry impregnated with a paper softening agent and containing a water-insoluble mineral flller by which the paper softening agent is adsorbed and retained in the paper;

the ratio of about 14 to 16 ounces of flller to about 28 fluid ounces of softening agent.

" 3.'A paper article characterized by strength, durability, flexibility andsoftness and capable of being moistened and dried without losing these characteristics, comprising a sheet of paper' having substantially the same mechanical strength whether wet or dry impregnated with a stable water-soluble polyhydroxy alcohol having a boiling point higher than water, and a water-insoluble mineral flller which fixes the alcohol in the paper. said alcohol and filler being present in the ratio of about 14 to 18 ounces of filler to about 28 fluid ounces of said alcohol.

4. A paper article characterized by strength,

durability, flexibility-and softness and capable of being moistened and dried without losing these characteristics, comprising a sheet of paper impregnated, with a stable water-soluble ester of a polyhydroxy alcohol having a boiling point higher than water adsorbed on a water-insoluble mineral filler, said ester and filler being present in the ratio of about 14 to 16 ounces of filler to about 28 fluid ounces of said ester.

5. A paper article characterized by strength,

' durability, flexibility and softness and capable of being moistened and driedwithout losing these characteristics, comprising a sheet of paper impregnated with a stable water-soluble ether of a polyhydroxy alcohol having a boiling point higher than water adsorbed on a water insoluble mineral filler, said ether and said filler being present in the ratio of about 14 to 18 ounces of flller to about 28 fluid ounces of ether.

6. A paper article characterized by strength. durability, flexibility and softness and capable of being moistened and dried without losing these characteristics, comprising a sheet of paper impregnated with glycerine and a water-insoluble of being moistened and dried without losing these agent and water in the proportions of about 28 mineral filler which fixes the glycerine in the insoluble mineral filler on which is adsorbed a paper, said mineral filler being present inthe paper softening agent of the class consisting of ratiooi about 14 to 16 ounces oi filler to about water soluble, stable polyhydroxy alcohols and 28 fluid ounces of glycerine. derivatives .of the same having higher boiling 7. A paper article characterized by strength, '5 points than water, prepared by impregnating said durability, flexibility and softness and capable paper with a solution containing filler, softening characteristics, comprising a sheet of paper fluid ounces oi softening agent, '72 to 80 fluid having substantially the same mechanical ounces of water and 14 to 16 ounces of filler. strength whether wet or dry containing a water- 10 FRANCIS DE WITT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2516444 *Nov 17, 1945Jul 25, 1950Leonard P FriederTreated paper parachute
US2684300 *May 13, 1948Jul 20, 1954Monsanto ChemicalsSizing paper and product
US2739068 *Jan 10, 1955Mar 20, 1956Burgess Cellulose CompanyStereotype mat
US2865792 *Dec 20, 1954Dec 23, 1958Eastman Kodak CoReduced curl in photographic paper
US2902399 *Nov 29, 1955Sep 1, 1959Ncr CoFilled paper
US3000763 *May 28, 1957Sep 19, 1961Dow Chemical CoCellulosic materials plasticized with hydroxypropylglycerol
US4289808 *Dec 12, 1979Sep 15, 1981Westvaco CorporationProcess for producing dry finished paperboard
US5223473 *Nov 21, 1990Jun 29, 1993Xerox CorporationElectrographic imaging
US5589034 *May 31, 1995Dec 31, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationPolymer-reinforced paper having improved cross-direction tear
US5690787 *Mar 25, 1996Nov 25, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Polymer reinforced paper having improved cross-direction tear
US5759346 *Sep 27, 1996Jun 2, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making smooth uncreped tissue paper containing fine particulate fillers
US5776308 *Oct 10, 1996Jul 7, 1998Rayonier Research CenterMethod of softening pulp and pulp products produced by same
US5858172 *Sep 15, 1997Jan 12, 1999Rayonier Inc.Method of softening pulp and pulp products produced by same
US5958185 *Nov 7, 1995Sep 28, 1999Vinson; Kenneth DouglasSoft filled tissue paper with biased surface properties
US6310268Aug 21, 2000Oct 30, 2001Rayonier Products And Financial Services CompanyFor disposable absorbent articles, such as diapers, feminine hygiene products, adult incontinence devices
WO1998015689A1 *Oct 3, 1997Apr 16, 1998Rayonier IncImproved method of softening pulp and pulp products produced by same
Classifications
U.S. Classification162/181.2, 162/181.6, 162/181.8, 162/181.3, 162/158
International ClassificationD21H17/06, D21H17/00, D21H17/68
Cooperative ClassificationD21H17/06, D21H17/68
European ClassificationD21H17/68, D21H17/06