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Publication numberUS2249806 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1941
Filing dateJun 28, 1939
Priority dateJun 28, 1939
Publication numberUS 2249806 A, US 2249806A, US-A-2249806, US2249806 A, US2249806A
InventorsBoris Bogoslowsky
Original AssigneeBoris Bogoslowsky
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 2249806 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. BOGQSLOWSKY July 22, 1941.

PUMP Filed June 28. 19:59

2 Sheets-Skeet 1 /Z Y L7' 7 llTTORNE July 22, 1941- B. BoeosLowsKY PUMP Fi led June 28, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

% lNV TOR Jiied form of the invention. theline tiofFigure 5.

Patented July 22. I

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFlCE' Boris n go'sicwfiewvork. N. x. 4

s Claims. (Cl. 103-149) Figure 7 is a side elevationpartly in section- This invention relates to pumps, and particularly to pumps having a flexible tube adapted to carry the fluid being transferred, and has for an object the provision of improvements in this art.

Pumps employing flexible tube's have been pro-- posed heretofore, as for example, the pump shown in the patent to Funk No. 513,315. In the previously known forms, a revolving roller squeezes a flexible tube progressivelyfrom its in-:

take end to its outlet end to cause movement ,of .fluid therethrough, the fluid being subjected to pressure ahead of the roll and fresh fluid being drawn into the tube behind the roll by the suction created by the re-expansion of the tube.

Several serious disadvantages of such pumps have been observed which have prevented their commercial use. One trouble is that the roller constantly pushes one wall of the tube in a forward direction, tending to produce a wave in the wall in advance of the roller, thus causing very severe strains which weaken and soon destroy the tube. Moreover, the rolling causes an abrading action which causes rapid disintegration of the tube. Another disadvantage has been that the suction created by the re-expansion of the tube has been insufficient for most purposes.

It is an object or the present invention to provide a commercialLv practical pump of this type which shall avoid the strains and abrasion referred to, and which shall be capable of operating for long periods of time without damage to the flexible tube.

It is a further object of the invention to provide means for. positively expanding the tube in order to increase the suctioneifect on the intake side.

Other objects and advantages of the will appear hereinafter.

A preferred embodiment of the invention seselected for purposes of illustration is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which,

invention A Figure 1 is a vertical axial section of a pump embodying the invention. the view being-taken on the line |'--l of Figure 2. V

Figure 2 is a vertical trans ers section taken on theline 2-2 of Figure 1. I

Figure 3 is aside elevation looking at the right sideofFigurel. a y Figure 4 is a horizontal axial sectiontaken on the line 4-4 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a vertical axial section of; a modi- Figure 0 is a horizontal xial section taken on surfaces is fixed, and the other is.mounted to gyrate. In another form of the invention both surfaces are mounted to gyrate. In either case,

however, the gyrating surface or surfaces are mounted to gyrate about a center or centers located on a line perpendicular to the principal plane of said loop, passing through the plane of the loop at a point within the periphery of the loop, preferably at the center of the loop. The center of gyration of any gyrating surface should also be preferably located in or near the plane of said gyrating surface.

Means are provided to gyrate any surface mounted for gyration, and means are also provided to restrain such surface against rotation. As a result, any given point on a gyrating surface oscillates about the center of gyration, moving toward and away from an opposed point on the opposite surface in a direction substantially perpendicular to the plane of the loop. As gyration proceeds, a rolling action is produced which compresses and expands the tube progressively along its length and advances the fluid through the tube, but the objectionable strains and abrasion to which the tubes of previous pumps have been subjected are avoided.

-In the embodiment illustrated in Figures 1 to 4 one of said working surfaces is a conical surface and the other is a plane surface, the'said surfaces being so arranged that the axis of the conical surface passes through the plane surface,

but with the plane surface intersecting the axis of the conical surface at an angle substantially equal to the .angle at which said conical surface intersects its axis.

Either surface. may be mounted for gyration I with 'respect'to the other, but in the embodiment illustrated in Figures lto 4 theconical surface is fixed and the plane surface is mounted to ss' ing a conical surface. The surface I! is a fixed surface and the surface is mounted for gyration as hereinafter explained.

Mounted between the said surfaces is a flexible tube l3, separately illustrated in Figures 7 and 8, which comprises straight portions l3a and l3b for inlet and outlet connections and a circular loop portion |3c therebetween. An' integral bulbous rib I 3d is provided on each side of the loop portion I 30 of the tube, and these ribs are anchored in the structures forming the opposed surfaces II and I2.

I With respect to the fixed surface H, such structures comprise the ring I4, and split members l5 and IS, the member l5 being an extension of the base l1, and the member l6 being secured thereto by bolts i8. An undercut slot I9 is formed in these members to receive and hold the rib I34 on this side.

With respect to the gyrating surface, such structures comprise the ring 24 and split ring 25, 26, said members having an undercut slot-23 to receive and hold the rib I3d on this side.

,The' means for mounting the surface H for gyration and the means for gyrating the same include the shaft 21 and a bearing comprising outer race 23,'.inner race 29 and balls 30. The

axis of the shaft coincides with the axis of the conical surface l2 and passes through the center of the plane surface ll. However, the shaft 21 passes through the race 29 in such manner that the surface If intersects the axis of the shaft atan angle substantially equal to the angle at which said conical surface intersects its axis. Thus, when the working surfaces are at the position of closest approach, as shown at the bottom of Figure 1, said surfaces are substantially parallel and compress the tube tightly to provide a tight seal.

The outer race 23 is, of course, fast in the ring 24, and the inner race 23 is fast on the shaft 21, being held between collars 3| and 32. The shaft 21 may be journaled in the sleeve 33, which may be replaced by a ball bearing, ifdesired, and is held against endwise movement in one direction by collar 34.

It will be observed that the gyrating surface is restrained from rotation by the tube itself,

since the tube is anchored to fixed members l4, l5 and it, but for some purposes, in order to relieve any tortional stress on the tube, addi tional restraining means may be provided. Thus the ring 25 may be provided with one or more studs 35 each having a ball 35 rotably mounted thereon, which said ball moves in arcuate grooves 31 formed in fixedbrackets 38. Preferablythe grooves are curved on an are having its center at the center of gyration, but the ball may slide longitudinally of the stud to compensate for irregularities. The brackets 38 may be mounted on the casing shell 39, which may be provided to surround and enclose the moving parts, or may be mounted on any other fixed member.

In operation, the shaft 21 is rotated, causing the race 23 to rotate. This, in turn, causes the surface H to gyrate about a center of gyration l ocated on the axis of the shaft 21 at the plane or, the surface ll. Rotation of the surface ll is'restrained, however, first, by the fact that the structure is anchored to the tube, and second, by the stud 36 and associated parts. Consequently each point in the surface ll oscillates toward and away from an opposed point in the surface i2. As gyration proceeds, the point of along progressively compressing the tube to force the fluid through the tube. At the same time the tube is positively expanded at the other side by the ribs l3d, thus tending to produce a vacuum to draw more fluid into the intake. When the upper part of the gyrating surface moves to the point of closest approach to the surface .l2, both intake and outlet passages may be closed momentarily.

In the pump illustrated in Figures 5 and 6, opposed working surfaces 4| and 42 are provided, both of these surfaces being conical surfaces. Both surfaces are mounted for gyration, and a flexible tube l3, of the same construction as previously described, is mounted between said surfaces and anchored to the structures forming said surfaces. Such structures are identical and comprise rings 43 and split rings 44, 45' with egidercut slots 46 to receive and hold the ribs The means for'mounting the surfaces 41 and '42 for gyration and the means for gyrating the same are similar to the means previously described and comprise a shaft 56 and identical bearings comprising outer races 41, inner races 48 and balls 49. The axis of the shaft intersects the axes of the conical surfaces 4| and 42, and the shaft passes through the races 48 in such manner that the axes of the conical surfaces are equally but oppositely inclined to the axis of the shaft.

The arrangement is such that whenthe working surfaces are at the position of closest approach, as shown at the bottom of Figure 5, said surfaces are substantially parallel and compress the tube tightly to provide a tight seal.

As before, the outer races 41 are fast in the rings 43 and the inner races 43 are fast on the shaft 55. The shaft may be journalled in sleevesv 50, which may be replaced by ball bearings, if desired, and is held against endwise movement by collars 5|.

Means to restrain the gyrating surfaces from rotation may also be provided, comprising grooved bracket 52 cooperating with studs 53 and balls 54 as previously described. If desired, the

' the tube. As before, the tube is positively expanded on the other side.

The pump is very simple, requiring no valves,

, no packing and no internal lubrication, and may closest approach between the surfaces moves be easily disassembled for inspection and repair. By the proper selection of suitable flexible material for the tube from among the many natural and synthetic rubber compounds and other substances now available, it is possible to handle almost every type of fluid, both liquid and gas, without deterioration of the tube.

The pump may be used both for compression and for suction and may be used in multiple units if desired, as for example for producing high vacuums. It may also be used as a motor or as a meter, if desired. 4

It will be understood that the invention may be variously modified and embodied within the scope of the subjoined claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A pump or the like, comprising, in combination, a pair of opposed surfaces, each of said surfaces being mounted for gyratory movement relative to the other, each of said surfaces being a conical surface having an axis passing through members to compress progressively said tube from the inlet endtoward the outlet end thereof, and simultaneously to expand positively that portion of the tube diametrically opposite the portion being compressed, and means independently of ,said

. tube for anchoring .said supporting members its respective center of gyration, and a flexible tube having a portion thereof in the form of a loop disposed between said surfaces, said tube being provided with inlet and outlet openings.

against relatlve rotating movement but permitting said relative axial movement therebetween.

5. In' a pump, in combination, a looped compressible tube having a fluid inlet at one endand a fluid outlet at its other end, an annular sta- 2. In a pump, in combination, a looped compressible tube having a fluid inlet at one end and a fluid outlet at its other end, a first annular supporting member, means extending along one side of said tube for securing said tube to said member and holding said ends in juxtaposition, a

' second annular supporting member and means along the opposite side of said tube for securing said tube to said second supporting member,

means independent of said tube for anchoring said members against relative rotative movement but permitting relative axial movement therebetween, and means for producing relative axial movementbetween said members to move the members progressively toward and away from each other to compress the tube progressively therebetween beginning at the inlet end and continuing toward the outlet end and simultaneously positively'to expand the tube diametrically opp'o site the portion under compression.

3. Ina pump, a looped compressible tube having a fluid inlet at one end and a fluid outlet at its other end, a first supporting member,'means,

tionary supporting member, means integral with said tube and extending along one side thereof for securing said tube-to said stationary supporting member and holding said ends in juxtaposition, an annular movable supporting member,

and means along the opposite side of said tube and integral therewith for supporting said second member, a shaft coaxial with said supporting members and said tube, means for mounting said movable supporting member on said shaft including a radial ball or roller bearing having an inner and an outer race, said inner race being secured at an angle to said shaft and said outer race supporting said mo'vable supporting member whereby rotation of said shaft produces axial gyration of said movable supporting member to compress said tube progressively from the inlet end toward 1 the outlet end thereof, and simultaneously to ex pand positively that portion of the tube diametrically opposite the portion under compression, and means independent of said tube for anchoring said movable supporting member against relative rotating movement with respect to said stationary supporting member but permitting asid relative axial movement therebetween.

6. In a pump, in combination, a looped com-.-

' pressible tube having a fluid inlet at one end and a fluid outlet at its other end, a rotatable shaft coaxial with said tube, opposing supporting members on either side of said tube and means for positively securing the respective sides of said securing one of said races to said shaft at an angle with respect thereto and means for securing the other of said races to said supporting members whereby rotation of said shaft produces relative axial movement between said supporting members to compress said tube progressively bep ginning at the inlet end and continuing toward the outlet end, and simultaneously to expand positively that portion of said tube diametrically opposite the portion under compression.

4. In a pump, in combination, a looped compressible tube having a fluid inlet at one end and a fluid outlet at its other end, a first supporting member, means along one side of i said tube for securing said'tube to said member and holding said ends in juxtaposition, a second supporting member, means along the opposite side of said tube for securing said tube to said second supporting member, a shaft, means for mounting one of said supporting members at an angle on said shaft comprising a radial ball or roller bearing having an inner and an outer'race, said inner race being secured at an angle to said shaft and said outer race supporting said supporting member whereby rotation ofsaid shaft produces axial gyration of said supporting member to produce relative axial movement between said supporting tube to the supporting members, means for I mounting said respective supporting members on said shaft, comprising radial ball or roller bearings having inner and outer races, said inner races being so secured to said shaft that the respective axes of said inner races lie at an angle to the axis of said shaft and with respect to each other, and said outer races respectively supporting said supporting members, and means independent of said tube for anchoringsaid supporting members against relative rotating movement therebetween but permitting relative axial movement therebetween whereby rotation of said shaft produces progressive relative axial movement between said supporting members to compress and expand said tube simultaneously.

7. An integral compressible tube for a rotary pump comprising, acircular looped portion and juxtaposed straight portions continuing from the ,respective ends of the looped portion, said looped portion having an elliptical cross-section and integral bulbous ribs extending exteriorly around the opposingsides of said looped portion.

8. In a pump, in combination, a compressible tube having a fluid inlet at one end-and a fluid outlet at its other end, a first supporting member, means extending along one side of said tube for securing said tube to said member for holding said 'ends in proper relationship, a second supporting member and means along the opposite side of said tube for securing said tube to said second supporting member, means independent 4 2,249,soe

- of said tube for anchoring said members against away from each other to compress the tube protransverse reiative movementbut permitting relgressively therebetween beginning 1 at .,the inlet alive to and fro movement therebetween, and end and continuing toward the outletend and means for producing relative to and fro movesimultaneously positively-to progressively expand ment between said supporting members to move 5 the tube following the compression.

the supporting members progressively toward and 'BORIS BOGOSLOWSKY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534855 *May 25, 1949Dec 19, 1950Corneil Ernest RTube flexing pumping machine
US2818815 *Jun 1, 1956Jan 7, 1958Corneil Ernest RLiquid transfer machine
US2915983 *Aug 10, 1956Dec 8, 1959 berrian
US3014348 *Feb 26, 1959Dec 26, 1961Hans A MauchAir source apparatus
US3192863 *Mar 14, 1962Jul 6, 1965Grenobloise Etude ApplBlood pump
US3495540 *Feb 26, 1968Feb 17, 1970Miles Lowell EdwardsAtraumatic blood pump
US3584983 *Nov 3, 1969Jun 15, 1971Mennen Greatbatch ElectronicsContinuous output pump
US3720489 *Apr 2, 1971Mar 13, 1973Raper DSelf contained fluid pump device
US3922119 *Jun 14, 1973Nov 25, 1975Amrose CorpPeristalitic diaphragm pump structure
US4482347 *Aug 12, 1982Nov 13, 1984American Hospital Supply CorporationPeristaltic fluid-pumping apparatus
US4493706 *Aug 12, 1982Jan 15, 1985American Hospital Supply CorporationLinear peristaltic pumping apparatus and disposable casette therefor
US4494285 *Apr 25, 1983Jan 22, 1985Windsor Medical, Inc.Method of making a member defining a lumen for a peristaltic pump and member produced by said method
US4678414 *Dec 8, 1986Jul 7, 1987Raymond Jr CharlesPeristaltic diaphragm pump with conically shaped nutating members
US9404489 *Sep 19, 2013Aug 2, 2016The Boeing CompanyPeristaltic pump system and method using a virtual ellipse motor
DE1053867B *Oct 5, 1955Mar 26, 1959RenaultMembraneinspritzpumpe fuer Brennkraftmaschinen
WO1984000690A1 *Aug 9, 1983Mar 1, 1984American Hospital Supply CorpPeristaltic fluid-pumping apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification418/45, 417/476
International ClassificationF04B43/00, F04B43/12
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/0072, F04B43/1207
European ClassificationF04B43/12B, F04B43/00D8T