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Publication numberUS2250106 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1941
Filing dateNov 29, 1938
Priority dateNov 29, 1938
Publication numberUS 2250106 A, US 2250106A, US-A-2250106, US2250106 A, US2250106A
InventorsHans K Lorentzen
Original AssigneeLorentzen Hardware Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Venetian blind head bar organization
US 2250106 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. K. LORENTZEN VENETIAN BLIND HEAD BAR ORGANIZATION July 22, 194i.

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QM, XM1? @www E? //w ATTORNEYS Patented July 22, 1941 VENETIAN BLIND HEAD BAR ORGANIZATION Hans K. Lorentzen, Montclair, N. J., assignor to Lorentzen Hardware Mfg Corp., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application November 29, 1938, Serial No. 24,2,8'16` 24 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in head bar organizations for Venetian blinds, and more particularly to such organizations wherein the operating parts are enclosed and substantially concealed.

An object of the present invention is to provide a head bar organization wherein use is made of a reciprocable rotary member upon which the elevator cords are Wound and from which they are unwound during the raising and lowering,

in conjunction with a rotatable member upon' which the cord for raising and lowering the slats is wound, an actuating drum of increased diameter upon which an operating cord can be wound and from which the same can be unwound.

A further object of the invention is to provide novel and simple constructions for such drums.

A further object of the invention is to provide actuating means comprising a drum upon substantially the same part of which one portion of a cord is wound and another portion thereof is unwound during raising and lowering of the blind slats.

A still further object of the invention is to provide gear operated mechanism in conjunction with a reciprocable and rotary member for rais- -ing and lowering the slats of the blind. l

An additional object of the invention is to provide a carriage for such gear operating mechanism, which carriage moves along with the reciprocated member during reciprocation thereof.

In carrying out the foregoing and other objects of'the invention it is contemplated that a head bar organization of the type disclosed herein will be particularly useful in connection with blinds of long length and of great height, which blinds necessarily are relatively heavy. The housing for the head bar organization is made up of end plates to which are secured top and bottom plates, a rear plate, and a front plate. 'Ihe operating mechanism for raising and lowering the blind comprises a tubular member mounted for rotation in the housing. In order that this tubular member or roller can be supported with the greatest eiiiciency, separted pairs of idler rollers are mounted within` the housing in positions to act as supports for the tubular member. In order that this member upon which the elevator cord is to be wound can be reciprocated as it is rotated to permit even winding of an elevator cord thereon, use is made of a screw member which is held against rotation and which .engages a threaded bushing fastened to one end of the tubular member.` This screw member, while being held against rotation, at the same time is secured to the housing in what may be called a oating fashion so that it is self-aligning with the tubular member and thereby does not aid in supporting the tubular member in any fashion.. The actuating mechanism for the tubular member in one form of the invention comprises a drum mounted on the tubular member intermediate the ends thereof,

Aand from which cord is unwound during rotation of the tubular member in the vother direction. Since the drum'is disposed intermediate the ends of the tubular member, pulleys are secured in the housing at suitable points to permit the cordwhich is wound onto the drum to pass out of the housing at a suitable point, preferably near one end thereof. The cords which are used in elevating and lowering the slats of the blind are secured at their respective ends to suitable collars on the tubular member, and at`their other ends to the bottom slat of the blind. As the tubular member rotates in one direction these cords are wound upon the drum as it reciprocates, thereby raising the slats of the blind. As the tubular member rotates in the other direction the cords are unwound from the tubular member, permitting the slats of the blind to be lowered. If desired the cords vmay be wound upon portions of the tubular member disposed longitudinally of the housing from their actual points of entry into the housing so that advantage may'be taken of the parts of the tubular member least subject to interference with other parts of 'the assembly.

In another form of the invention the drum before described may have the two ends or other parts of a cord associated therewith in such 2 2,250,106 Y fashion that as a part of the cord is unwound Fig. ,1'4 is'a view of a cord retaining member from the drum another part thereof is wound used in conjunction with the tilting drum;

onto substantially the same part of the drum. Fig. 15 is a top view of the coupling member In order that the drum may be of minimum connecting the tilt bar with the gear drum assolength for the requirements. this invention prociated with the tilting drum;

vides that the ends or other parts of the cord Fig. 16 is a view of a modified kform of slat shall be secured adjacent opposite ends of the raisingr drum, such modification being asubstidrum and the points of take-off yand entry upon tute for the drum shown in Fig. 2;

the drum of the two parts of the cord are sub- Fig. 17 is a view of another modification of stantially in lateral alignment with each other l0 the mechanism for imparting rotation and recipso that the drum is in effect almost completely rocation to the actuating member;

lled with cord at all times. Y n Fig. 18 is a section taken substantially on the In a still further form of operating mechanism' line I8-I8 of Fig. 17, and

for rotating the tibular member, and consequent- Fig. 19 is a section taken substantially on the ly imparting reclprocation thereto, use is made line I9-I9 of Fig. 17.

of a worm gear mounted on Vthe tubular member Referring now Vto the drawings, and particuand engaged by a worm fastened in a carriage larly to Figs. 1 to 2a inclusive, I0 indicates genwhich in turn is secured to the tubular member erally a housing made in accordance with this so that as this tubular member is reciprocated invention, rsuch housing comprising end plates the carriage moves along with it. The worm can 20 II and I2, a bottom plate I4, a back plate I5, be rotated by an endless cord passing around atop plate I6, and a front plate I 1. which front a pulley on one end of the worm shaft, which plate is shown partially broken away in Fig. 1.`

cord is introduced into the housing near one end The end plates II and I2 have outwardly exthereof. l tending anges for the attachment of certain of -The main drum upon which the cord is Wound the other plates. 'I'hese anges extend outwardfor rotating the tubular member used in elevat-l ly from all four edges 0f each 0f the plates. As

ing and lowering the blind may be made of a A shown in the drawings, the bottom plete I4 is simplifled construction comprising two collar secured to the end plates II and I2 above the members having inwardly directed ring-like lower edges 0f the end plates so that parts 0f flanges to receive thereon a cylindrical shell the plates extend dOWnWardly t0 aiford supports made up of sheet metal rolled into tubular form for a tilt bar in a manner to be explained fin and spot-Welded or otherwise secured to a metaldetail later. The plates comprising the housing lic strap. This strap can extend beyond the ends are all made of sheet metal and can be secured of the tubular member and pass through slots together by screws. rivets. 0r by spot-Welding, 0r inthe collars to hold the tubular member against in any Other desiredmanner- The bOttOIn plate rotation relative to thecollars. The collars are I4 has an' upwardly extending flange I4' at the secured to the rotating tubular member so that front edge thereof, and the t0n Plate I5 has a in'this fashion the entire drum can be assembled downwardly extending flange I6 also at the front on'the tubularmembenand preassembly of the edge thereof. These flanges make possible the i partsis therefore not necessary. 40 attachment of the front plate II by screws, pref- Other features and advantages of the invenerably. s0 that this frOnt Plate Can be removed tion will be apparent by reference to' the followat any time for repairs and the like.

ing detailed. description of the accompanying Rotatably and reciprocally mounted within the drawingsy wherein; v housing is an elongated tubular member 20 uti- Fig. 1 is, a front view of a cross bar organiza- 45 liZed in lifting and lowering the slats 0f a blind tion embodying the invention; associated with the housing. The supporting Fig. 2 is an enlarged front view with the'front means for this tubular member 20 comprises plate removed of that portion from the left end Dells 0f ldlel lOllelS 2l. DiVOtB'lly mounted beof Fig, 1 to the line A A thereof; tween pairs of partition platesv 22 located at Fi'g 2a is a Similar View of that 'pori-,ion of 50 spaced intervals along the length of the tubular Fig 1 from the line A A to the right end thereof; member 20. Dependent upon the length of the Fig. 3 is an enlarged end view of theleft end housing "l and 0f the tubular member 20 any of the device showing the gear drum and tnt desirednumber'of pairs lof idler rollers can be mechanism incorporated in this invention; provided AS Shown lll the dra-Wings tW0 Pairs Fig. 4 is a section taken substantially on the 55 are Sunlelent fOr a housing 0f the length illus- 1ne'| 4 of Fig. 3; trated herein, but it will be evident that under Fig 5 1S a section taken Substantially on the certain conditions additional support for this une 5 5 of Fig 4; tubular member may be advisable. The parti- Fig, 6 is a, section taken substantially on the t1ons 22 are made of sheet metal and preferably line 3 5 of Fig' 2; 60 have upper and lower iianges for securing the Fig. 7 is a section taken substantially on the partitions in plaee between the Upper and 10We1 line 1 1 of F1g 2; i plates I4 and I6 by means of screws, rivets, or Fig, 3 1s a section taken substantially on the by spot-welding, or in any other desired fashion. line 3 3 of Fig 2a; These plates have openings disposed substantially Fig 9 is an enlarged 'blzoken Section taken 65 centrally thereof for the passage of the tubular substantially on the une 9 9 off-1&2; I member 20. Due to this arrangement of sup- Fig 10 is an enlarged section taken substam porting idler rollers it follows` that the tubular tially on the line III-'III of Fig, 2a; member 20 is supported and aligned entirely by Fig. l1 is a view of the locking dog incorporated lts Contact with these muere in the present invention with a part of the Sup. 70 Rotation of the tubular member 20 is effected rounding housing broken away; through a drum indicated generally at 24, on Fig. 12 is an enlarged section taken substan- Wlllell een lie'WOllnd a 00rd 25- The construction tiauy on the 1in@ |2 |2 of Fig 11; of this drum will be set forthin detail later. As

I Fig. 13.is a section taken substantially on the Shown ln Fig 2 elle end 0f the Cord. 25 ls fas' lme |3 |3 of F1g 5; 75 tened to an end of the drum as at 26 so that end of the housing (Fig..2a).

the cord cannot become completely separated from the drum. The cord 25 is led under a pulley 21 mounted inasuitable bracket 21' secured to the bottom lplate I4. Fromsthis pulley 21 the cord passes through the right hand pair of partitions22 (Fig. 2a) and over'a pulley 28 mounted in .a bracket 28 near the right .hand The cord after passing over the pulley 28 extends through an opening 30. in bottom plate I4 and downwardly to bemanually operated.V In conjunction with the pulley 28 :use is made of a locking dog 3| also pivotally mountedinthe bracket 29. As shown in Fig. 2a, this dog 3| can move to a position Vwherein the cord is firmly gripped between the teeth of the dog and the pulley 28 to prevent additional passage of cord into the housing.

Since manipulation of the cord `25 can cause unwinding of this cord -from the drum to rotate the tubular member 20 in one direction, it is necessary that means bev `provided for rotating the tubular member 28 in the reverse direction. For this purpose lift cords r32 .and 34 fastened to the bottom slat 35 of a 'blind associated .with the housing are arranged to be wound upon and unwound from the tubular member 20. Referring to Fig. 2 it will be seen that the cord 32 passes through an opening in bottom plate l4overa pulley 361mounted in a bracket 31 secured to bottom plate I4, thence through suitable apertures in the partitions 22, and under a-pulley 38 mounted in a bracket 39 also secured tothe bottom plate I4. The cord 32has the upper end thereof fastened securely to the disc-like portion 40.extendingoutwardly from a collar 4I secured to the tubular member 20 by one Ior more set screws- 42.

The other lift cord 34, as shown inFig. 2a, passes through an opening in the bottom plate |.4 over a pulley 44 Vmounted in a bracket 45 secured tothe bottom plate I4 and under'a pulley 46 mounted in a bracket 41 also secured to bottom plate I4 into position to be wrapped around the tubularmember 2|).I The upper end of this cord `34 -is likewise securely fastened to a disclike portion 40' of a second collar 4|' fastened to the tubular member 28' byA one or more set screws 42. -The collars 4I and 4I are identical The bushing 48canbe held in the end f member /28 against rotation relative thereto in any desired manner. One convenient method of fastening' this'bushing in'place is shown in Fig. 10, wherein it will be yseen that Vone or `both of the set screws 42 utilized in securing collar 4I on theA member 20,- canv be `tightened with such force as to bind `the wall of member 2li/'against the periphery of bushing 49. The other end of the screw 48 vpasses through an opening inthe mid part of a plate 5I, and :this end of the screw 48 is staked or otherwise vfastened to the plate 5I so that these parts are-incapableof relative rotation. The plate 5I, as shownin ,Figs 211,18, and

10, has the central part thereof Aoiset relative to the end parts-to provide achannel forthe Astaked the end plate I2.

end of -the screwso that the upper and lower edge portions lof this Tplate-*can rest nat yagainst In order that this screw 48 may be mounted in what may be called oating fashion,` guideways are provided therefor, which guideways are `in the nature-of a pairof .Zbars 52 secured tothe end plate I2 in any desired fashion. These Z bars are spaced apart sufciently to permit limited vertical motion of the plate 5I, and at the same time .they do not restrain this plate against horizontal motion; Due

to this attachment of .the plate 5I `to end plate |2,'it follows that the screw 48 is not subjected to any strain which might be.occasioned if this screw had to support any of the Weight of the tubular member 20. lInstead of affording such, support, this screw. 48 is free to become selfaligned with the tubularmember 20 as it rotates on -the supports formed vby the idler rollers 2|, but at the same time the screw 48 is held by the cooperation of plate `5I andthe socket formed by' bars 52 'against rotation relative to the housing III.

The operation of the parts described to this point is substantially as follows: Considering thel blind associated with the housing I0 and indi- .,cated at'B-`to be in itsfully lowered condition,

the elevator-cords 32 and'3'4 will be substantially completely unwound from the tubular member 2D, and thev disclike portions 40 and 40 of the collars 4| and'4'l will be positioned slightly to the rigl'it of the pulleys 38 and46. At the same time the drum 24 will be substantially completely filled Asvthis member 20 rotates winding the cords 32 and `34 therearound, the tubular member 20 is moved to the right of the housing by the engagement of bushing 49with the screw 48. Lifting of the blind by downward pull on the'cord 25 can .be stopped at any desired point, and theblind locked in this position by the action of the dognSI which will grip the cord in its upward Itravel as long as the cord is extending substantially truly vertical. When it is desired to lower the blind the cord 25 extending below the housing I8 can be moved to the left and pulled downwardly suflciently to release the dog 3|. So long as the vcord is held out of .true vertical position and toward .the left, it can bevreleased to enter the housing |0. As soon as this release has been effected, the weight of the blind is suilcient to cause an unwinding of the cords 32 and 34, anda consequent winding of cord 25 upon the drum 24. If vnecessary a weight bar W can be secured `to the underside of the bottombar35` of the blind B to assure such operation. This ro`tationof the tubular member 20 as the blind is lowered causes movement of the member 2|) toward the left by the cooperation of the screw 48 and the bushing 48. The various parts assembled on themember 20 can be assembled successively as this member "is moved through an opening in one'end plate of the housing toward the other end plate.

Thevdrum 24 may be` Vmade in various forms, but a simple form thereof isshown in Fig. 9. In

this figure it will be seen that use is made of two column members 88 and 8| vhaving discflike portions-62.'.and 64 from which extend respec- 4 i Y 9,250,106 f sheet to a metallic strap 68 with the longitudinal edges of the sheet in linear contact. The strap 58 extends beyond the ends of the cylinder 61 and serves yto lock this cylinder against rotation relative to the collars 89 and 6|. To accomplish this result the disc-like portions 62 and 94 have slots 82 and 84' cut therein, which slots extend to the peripheriesl of the extensions 65 and 86. 'Ihe ends of the strap 68 fit in these slots 62 and 64'. If desired one end of the strap 88 can be bent over as shown at 69 to secure one end of the cord 25 to the drum 24 through the agency of the knot 26 in the end of this cord. The tubular shell 61 is made of internal diameter to snugly iit around the extensions 65 and 98.. With this' arrangement it is possible to assemble the drum directly on the member 29 by slipping rst one collar 69 onto the member 29, next fitting the drum 81 around the extension 89, and then slipping theother collar onto the member 29. When the shell 61 has been correctly fitted between the flanges 82 and 64, the collars 99 and 9| can be locked to themember 29 by suitable set screws 19 passing through the collars and engaging the member 29. It is to be understood, however, that other forms of drums can be used.

The locking dog 9i before mentioned is made of novelconstruction in that instead of being made from a single block o1' material, this dog ismade up of a plurality oflaminations 1| (Figs. ilfand 12), which laminations prior to assembly have a plurality of teeth 12 cut in a curved edge of each thereof. These teeth, as shown in Fig. 12, may have their adjacent edges spaced apart a slight amount if desired. Due to this .arrange- .ment it follows that the curved edge of the dog 9| is provided with a multiplicity oi' teeth considered along the length of the curved edge and also across the thickness of the dog. In practice it has been found that such a multiplicity of teeth afford considerably greater gripping force than a plurality of cross teeth cut in a solid member. The laminations can be fastened together y of suitable metal having end portions 8| bent into 55 substantial parallelism. 'Ihe bar 89 is keyed onto a stub shaft member 82, which extends through a gear 84, and is journaled for rotation in an opening in the depending part of end p late This stub shaft 82, as shown in Fig. 4, has a 60 ilange-like head engaging one surface of the gear 84 and is internally threaded for the reception of a screw 85 which serves to lock the bar 8| onto the shaft. In conjunction 'with the bar 8| use is made of a head bar plate 86 fitting over the end vof the tilt bar 19 and having an angular portion 81 extending under the bar 'I9 and apertured for the reception of a screw 88 utilized in securing the composite member 86, 81 in place. Suitable slots are cut in the part 99 and into the material of the tilt bar 19 for the reception of the ends 8| of the bar 89. 'Ihe other end of the tilt bar 19 has a gudgeon pin 89driven thereinto or otherwise secured thereto, which gudgeon pin is adapted to seat in a slot 99 in the 'I'he cylindrical part of the drux`is-A depending portion of end plate l2. lBy reference y to Fig. 8 it will be seen that the slot 99 has a tapered portion v99 extending to the front'edge of the ,plate I2` whereby this pin can be introduced into proper position. When the tilt bar 19 has been first engaged with the bar 6i it can then be secured to the head bar organization by end plate Teeth 94 'of a second gear rotating with the gear having teeth 99 are in mesh with teeth 99 of a gear 96 which in turn is secured for rotation to the operating mechanism for this train of gears.

This operating mechanism comprises a drum 91 mounted within the headbar organization. As shown in Fig. 4, the drum 91 is made of thin sheet metal with the cylindrical ends thereof fastened to end plates 99 and 99. The drum 91 is part of an assembly of drum and parallel wall-like plates |99 and |9i. One end plate." has fastened thereto a journal |92 which extends through the wall member |99 and which has the gear 99 secured thereon. 'I'he other end plate 99 has a journal |94 secured thereto andy passing through the other wall member |9| in spaced relation thereto. Between the end plate 99 and wall |9| is positioned a spring washer |95 which bears against the plate 99 and against a fibre washer |99 resting flatly against one surface of wail i 9|. Asecond fibre washer |91 is positioned against the other surface of wall i9|, all of these parte.A being held in place by a screw |98 fitting into the hollowed out journal |94 with the head of the screw resting against a metallic washer |99. The spring |95 with its associated fibre washer serves as a brake to prevent undesired rotation of the drum 91. Inasmuch as this assembly of walls |99 and |9| and drum 91 must be attached to the head bar organization, provision for such attachment has been made in the nature of a keyhole slot ||9 in the end plate of the head bar. The enlarged part of slot ||9 is of diameter sufllcient to permit the passage of gear 96, while the rest of the slot is of a width corresponding to the diameter of the journal |92. Use is also made of a bracket member ||I secured to the bottom plate i4 and having a portion extending upwardly in parallelism with the end plate This upstanding part of the bracket has a slot ||2 cut therein from the top to a position near the bottom of the bracket, and this slot extends horizontally into the part il@ of the bracket. The slot ii2 serves to receive the washer |99.

The assembly of walls and drum can be made by introducing this assembly into the head bar housing at the front thereof; then extending the gear 96 through the notch of the keyhole slot i|9 until this gear clears the end plate The assembly may then be moved downwardly into the space between end plate and bracket 'When the wall members |99 and |9| contact the bottom plate |4 the assembly can be locked in place by a latch member 4 one end of which is inserted into a slot ||5 formed by cutting notches in the edges of the keyhole slot and then the latch H4 is locked sufficiently'securely in place by forcing a spring loop H6 thereof into the continuation of slot H2 as shown clearly n Fig. 4.

The drum 91 is provided with a longitudinal slot H1 (Fig. 4) of width slightly greater than the diameter of a cord H8 associated with the drum. In addition to slot H1 the drum is provided with two openings H9 in end portions thereof substantially diametrically opposite the slot H1. Due to the provision of this slot and the openings H9 it is possible to pass the two .ends of the cord H8 through the two openings H9 with the mid portion of the cord underlying the shell of drum 91 as indicated at H8'. Since the cord is in effect secured to the drum at the ends thereof it is possible to operate the cord in such fashion that While one end .part thereof is being wound upon the drum the other` end part thereof is being unwound from the drum. Consequently the drum is substantially completely filled with cord at all times and the maximum desired rotation of the drum can be accomplished with a minimum length of cord space thereon.

In normal operation of the drum, the cord H8 is so wrapped around the drum from each end thereof that when the tilt bar 19 is in a horizontal position one end of the cord extends substantially from the mid point and at the top ofV the drum 91 while the other end of the cord extends substantially from the mid point and from the bottom of the drum. This condition is shown in Fig. wherein it will be seen that one end ||8a extends from the top of the drum while the other end ||8b extends from the bottom of the drum, with cord H0a crossing the cord ||0b andv passing over a pulley mounted in a bracket which will be described later. The othercord I |8b passes over a pulley |2| mounted in the same bracket and on the same shaft as the pulley |20. These pulleys are of the idler type so that one can rotate in one direction while the other rotates in the other direction. The bracket in which these pulleys |20 and 2| are mounted is made up of two upstanding arms l| 22 and |24 connected at the bottom by a flat strip of metal |25 integral with the arms. This flat strip |25 is pivotally secured to a-plate |26 which in tum is fastened to the bottom plate I4. The two upstanding arms |22 and |24 have their top edge portions tapered upwardly toward the rear as shown at |21 in Fig. 13. As these varms near their inner ends and approach the drum 91, they are bent inwardly as shown at |22' and |24' to provide a passage of substantial hourglassform; which passage has its restricted part of a width substantially equal to the diameter of the cord H0. Due to the pivotal arrangement of these arms'it follows that they are free to follow the cord as a portion of the cord is unwound from the drum, and simultaneously another portion wound upon the drum.

The cords H8a and H8b pass from the pulleys |20 and |2| through the bottom of the housing; matched arcuate slots |30 being provided in both `the plate |26 and the bottom plate |4. These slots are of such overall length as to accommodate the cords in the extreme positions assumed by the pulleys upon movement of the guide portions of this supporting bracket.

Assuming that the cord is in the position shown in Fig. 5 which corresponds to the position in which the tilt bar is horizontal, if the cord H8a is pulled downwardly by an operator it will cause unwinding of a part of the cord from the drum this pulley |31.

the gear train. When all of the cord portion Illia` has been unwound from the drum the tilt bar will be in its extreme angular position in one direction. Simultaneously with the unwinding of the part H8d from the drum, the part H8b is wound upon the drum so that the drum remains substantially filled with cord. During this passage of the cord the guide formed by the two arms |22 and |24 moves over to the left hand dotted line position shown in Fig. 5. A reverse movement of the tilt bar can be accomplished `by pullingy the other cord H 8b, causing this part of the cord to be unwound from the drum, and simultaneously causing the part |8a to be wound upon the drum. A full movement orrotation of the drum to accomplish this reverse tilting of the tilt bar results in the guide members moving from the dotted position at the left in Fig. 5 to the dotted position at the right in Fig. 5. This guide arrangement assures that pant of the -described in connection withpreceding figures,

with the exception that the metal strip 63 used in this drum has two bent over parts 69 instead ofa single part as shown in Fig. 9. Due tothe provision of these two parts 69 it is possible to fasten the two ends of a cord to the respective ends of the "drum One, end of the cord passes over a pulleyr |36 suitably mounted in the housing and over a pulley |31, and from the bottom of the housing; a locking dog 3| similar to that previously described being associated with The other end |38 of the cord passes over/ a pulley |39 mounted with its axis at right angles tothe pulley |36 and very closeA thereto. The cord |38 then passes over a pulley |40 and through the bottom of' the housing. Due to this arrangement, as the cord portion |35 is pulled downwardly byan operator this part of the cord is unwound from the drum 24 causing ,rotation thereofn Simultaneously the other part y |30 of the cord is wound upon the drum. 'I'he reverse movement of the two cords will cause reverse movement of the drum, with the result that when-one part of the cord has been completely unwound from the drum the other part thereof l comf is wound upon the drum to substantiall pletely flll it. Thus for the desired rotation of the drum the minimum length thereof can ac-` commodate the amount of cord necessary to accomplish vrotation in both directions. If desired a weight |4| connected to a pulley |42 can be utilized for keeping both portions of the cord under tensionA at all times, since the pulley |42 rests in the loop of the cord depending from the housing. Other arrangements may be used for the same purpose.

In Figs. 17, 18 and 19 a modified arrangement for imparting rotation to a member 20', similar to member 20 -prev'lously described, is illustrated. This arrangement is made up of a traveling carriage formed of an upright thick plate |50 having an opening therein for the passage of the mem- A ber 20. This plate |50 extends downwardly to a point close to but out of contact with the bottom bar I4. To the lower end part or" the plate |50 is secured a thick bar |5| having recesses |52 cut therein, in which recesses are mounted rollers or wheels |54 by means of pins |55. These rollersv or wheels permit movement of the carriage plate |50 along with the rotating member 20 as this member is reciprocated. Extending horizontally from opposite edges of the plate |50 are two narrow flanges |60 having aligned apertures therein for the passage of a shaft |6|. Secured on this shaft |6| is a worm |62, which worm can be locked to the shaft by a set screw |63 or by some other suitable arrangement. Due to the locking of the worm |62 on the shaft and since the worm is of length approximately corresponding to the distance between the flanges |60, the shaft is substantially incapable of axial movement. To the outer end of shaft |6| is secured a pulley |64 of relatively large diameter. This pulley serves to receive a cord |65 in the peripheral groove of the pulley. The cord is held in intimate contact with the groove of the pulley by two idler pulleys |66 and |61 mounted on the ends of two arms |68 and |69 respectively. 'I'he other ends of the two arms 68 and |69 are pivot- -ally secured to a rigid arm extending laterally from the bottom of the carriage roller bar" |5| in the opposite direction from the members |60. A spring |1| is fastened between the two arms |68 and |69 to force them together so that the pulleys |66 and |61 are in intimate contact with the periphery of the pulley |64. These two pulleys |66 and |61 have flanges to engage the opposite surfaces of the pulley |64 so that the two idler pulleys are always held in proper relation to pulley |64.

Secured to the member 20' is a collar |15 having as a part thereof teeth |16 shaped to mesh with the worm |62. One or more set screws |11 may be utilized to fasten this collar on the member 20'. The end of collar |15 closest to the carriage bar |50 is separated from this bar by an anti-friction bearing assembly |18, which assembly makes use of ball bearings. A second collar` |19 is secured to the member 20' by one or more set screws |80, and this second collar is separated from the opposite surface of the carriage bar |50 by a second anti-friction element |8| employing ball bearings.

The operation of this embodiment of the invention is substantially as follows: The cord |65 passing around pulley |64 has its ends joined together so that it is in effect endless. This cord passes out of the housing over two separated pulleys |85 and |86. As this cord is manipulated to rotate the pulley |64 in one direction, such roi tation of the pulley causes rotation of worm |62 and consequent rotation of the worm gear |16. Since this gear is fastened to the tubular member 20', this member likewise rotates. Reciprocation is simultaneously imparted to the member 20 in the manner previously described in connection with the first embodiment of the invention. Due to the positioning of the anti-friction elements between the collars and |19 and the carriage bar |50, the member and these two collars can rotate relative to the carriage bar and at the same time move the carriage bar along with the member 20'. The rollers |54 previously mentioned permit the carriage bar to move along the bottom plate of the housing, but if desired the front roller |54, or indeed either roller, may be omitted since a single roller under certain conditions would suffice.

I claim:

1. A Venetian blind head bar organization member, a cord adapted to be wound upon and comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of saidy member and arranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, means for rotating said member, and means for causing reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

2. A Venetian blind head bar organization cornprising, a housing, a rotatable and reclprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords,

means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the end-s of said member and arranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, means for rotating said member, and a screw engaging said member,.said screw being secured to said housing with sufficient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member, and to cause reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

3. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member to support the same, means for rotating said member, and means for causing reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

4. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a. housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member intermediate the ends thereof to support said member, means for rotating said member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with sufficient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member and to cause reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

5. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of said member and arranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, a drum on said member, said drum being of considerably larger diameter than said member, a cord adapted to be wound upon and unwound from said drum to cause rotation of said drum and said member, and means for causing reciprocation `of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

6. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of said member and arranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, a drum on said member, said drum being of considerably larger diameter than said unwound from said drum to cause rotation of said drum and said member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with suflicient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member, and to cause reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

'1.A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member to support the same, a drum on said member, said drum being of considerably larger diameter than said member, a cord adapted to be Wound upon and unwound from said drum to cause rotation of said drum and said member,

- and means for causing reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

8. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member intermediate the ends thereof to support said member, a drum on said member, said drum being of considerably larger diameter than said member, a cord adapted toy be wound upon and unwound from said drum to cause rotation of said drum and said member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with suicient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member to cause reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

9. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and recipro. cable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of said member andarranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, a drum on said member, a cord secured to said drum at spaced points adjacent to the respective ends of the drum, part of said cord being adapted to be wound upon substantially the same part of the drum from which another part of the cord is unwound to cause rotation of the drum and said member, and means for causing reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

10. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of said member and arranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, a drum on said member, a cord secured to said drum at spaced points adjacent to the respective ends of the drum, part of said cord being adapted to be wound upon substantially the same part of the drum from which another part of the cord is unwound to cause rotation of the drum and said member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with suilicient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member, and to cause reciprooation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

11. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member to support the same, a drum ,associated with said member for rotating the on said member, a cord secured to said drum 12. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member intermediate the ends thereof to support said member, a drum on said member, a cord secured to said drum at spaced points adjacent to'the respective ends of the drum, part of said cord being adapted to be wound upon substantially the same part ol the drum from which another part of the cord is unwound to cause rotation of the drum and said member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with sufiicient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member to cause reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

13. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of said member and arranged to Contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, a cord actuated gear arrangement operatively member, and means for causing reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

14. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, means positioned at spaced intervals intermediate the ends of said member and arranged to contact said member in spaced relation to the periphery thereof to support said member, a cord actuated gear arrangement operatvely associated with said member for rotating the member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with suflicient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member, and to cause lreciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

15. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member to support the same, a cord actuated gear arrangement operatively associated with said member for rotating the member, and means for causing reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

16.A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising, a housing, a rotatable and reciprocable member in said housing to receive elevator cords, pairs of idler rollers at spaced intervals along said member intermediate the ends thereof to support said member, a cord actuated gear arrangement operatively -associated with said member for rotating the member, and a screw engaging said member, said screw being secured to said housing with suiiicient freedom of movement to cause it to be self-aligning with said member to cause reciprocation of said member in response to the rotation thereof.

17. A Venetian blind organization comprising, a cord operated member for actuating part of said organization, said member comprising a drum, a cord secured to said drum at spaced points adjacent the respective ends thereof, said cord being so wrapped around and guided relative to said drum that unwinding of a part of the cord from the drum to cause rotation thereof causes simultaneous winding of another part of the cord upon substantially the same part of the drum from which the rst mentioned part is unwound.

18. A Venetian blind organization comprising, a cord operated member for actuating part of said organization, said member comprising a drum, a cord secured to said drum at spaced points adjacent the respective ends thereof, means for guiding parts `of said cord to and from said drum, said cord being so wrapped around said drum and said guide means being so disposed that unwinding of a part of the cord from the drum causes simultaneous winding of another part of the cord uponsubstantially the same part of the drum from which the rst mentioned part is unwound.

19. A drum of the character described, comprising a pair of collars, said collars having disciike portions and annular flange portions extending axially of the disc-like portions and directed l toward each other, a cylindrical metal shell tting around said iiangesbetween said disc-like portions, means for holding said shell against rotation relative to said collars, said parts being locked together by securing said collars on an axially disposed member.

20. A drum of the character described, comprising a pair of collars, said collars having disclike portions and annular ange portions extend-V ing axially of the disc-like portions and directed toward each other, a cylindrical metal shell fitting around said flanges between said collars, the longitudinal edges of said shell being secured to a metallic strap, said disc-like portions having slots receiving the ends of said strap to hold said shell against rotation relative to said collarsl said parts beingv locked together by securing said collars on an axially disposed member.

21. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising a housing, a member mounted for rotation and reciprocation therein to operate the elevator cords of a blind, said member having a gear thereon, a carriage mounted in said housing for longitudinal movement relative thereto along with said member. as it reciprocates, and a cord operated gear carried by said housing and meshing with the gear on said member for imparting rotation to said member.

22. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising a housing, a member mounted for rotation and reciprocation therein to operate the elevator cords of a blind, said member having a gear thereon, a vertical lcarriage plate mounted in said housing for longitudinal movement relative thereto, said member passing through said plate, means on said member acting through anti-friction devices for causing said plate to move in said housing as said member reciprocates, and a cord operated gear carried by said housing and meshing with the gear on said member for 'imparting rotation to said member.

23. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising a housing, a member mounted for rotation and reciprocation therein to operate the elevator cords of a blind, a pair of spaced collars on said member, one of said members having a gear thereon, a carriage plate mounted in said housing for longitudinal movement relative thereto, said member passing through said plate, said plate being located between said collars and spaced from each thereof by anti-friction elements whereby said plate moves longitudinally in the housing as said member reciprocates, and a cord operated gear carried by said housing and meshing with the gear on said member for imparting rotation to said member.

24. A Venetian blind head bar organization comprising a housing, a member mounted for rotation and reciprocation therein to operate the elevator cords of a blind, said member having a gear thereon, a carriage mounted in said housing for longitudinal movement relative thereto along with the reciprocation of said member, a worm carried by said housing and meshing with the-gear on said member, a cord operated pulley operatively connected to said worm whereby rotation of said pulley causes rotation of the worm and gear, and means for retaining cord in intimate contact with said pulley.

HANS K. LORENTZEN.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification160/170, 160/176.10R, 160/171
International ClassificationE06B9/304, E06B9/32
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2009/3225, E06B9/304, E06B2009/3227
European ClassificationE06B9/304