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Publication numberUS2250171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1941
Filing dateAug 26, 1940
Priority dateAug 26, 1940
Publication numberUS 2250171 A, US 2250171A, US-A-2250171, US2250171 A, US2250171A
InventorsHugh A Wilkins
Original AssigneeHugh A Wilkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable dog leash
US 2250171 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- y 1941- H. A. WILKINS 2,250,171

ADJUSTABLE DOG LEA-SH Filed Aug. 26, 1940 II I Patented July 22, 1941 UETE STTES PATENT FFICE ADJUSTABLE DOG LEASH Hugh A. Wilkins, Oak Park, 111.

Application August 26, 1940, Serial No. 354,213

Claims.

This invention relates to dog leashes and has for its principal object to provide a leash on a reel that will fit in the hand of the user and give complete control of the leash in running out, taking in, and holding it at a selected length.

Generally speaking, this is accomplished by fastening the leash to a spring reel mounted in a small flat casing adapted to be carried in the partly closed hand with a hollow nipple for the leash between the middle finger and the ring finger, and a control brake handle against the base of the thumb. With such an arrangement the device fits within the hand in the natural position for casual carrying at ease, or for gripping to check or hold the dog. The grasp is natural and easy and the brake can be applied quickly and lightly, or quickly with all the power of the users hand.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a diagrammatical sketch illustrating the use of the device with a dog;

Fig. 2 is a side view with part of the casing broken away to reveal the interior; and

Fig. 3 is a transverse section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

But this particular drawing and the corresponding description are used for the purpose of disclosure only and are not intended to impose unnecessary limitations on the claims.

The leash generally indicated at A is shown wound on a reel, generally indicated at B, rotatably mounted within a casing C, and normally urged by a spring D to a position to wind up or retract the leash A.

The case is shown as generally round or cylindrical with fiat sides or heads and comprises an outer cylindrical wall It and side walls or heads ll and 12, the latter being separate from the wall ill but secured to it by turning over the flange it against the beveled edge l4.

On one portion of the periphery, shown here at the bottom and what may be called the front side, there is a hollow nipple l5, having an opening l6, generally flat in cross section and flared inwardly at IT, to provide the round, smooth surface It for contact with the leash A. At each side of the nipple l5 there are projections l9 and separated from each other and from the nipple l5 by curved walls 2| and 22, which form finger seats curved in both directions to naturally fit within the grasp of the fingers bent to a partly closed position.

The reel B includes a rim 23 and a web 24, here shown as in one piece. The inner end of the leash is made fast to the rim 23 by a stout rivet 25 and the outer end is run through the nipple l5 and fitted with a snap hook 26.

The wall ll of the casing is provided at the center with an integral stud 2'! which forms a bearing for the web 24 of the reel and about which the reel rotates.

The other wall I2 is provided with a shoulder 28, which forms a bearing for the inner side of the rim 23 opposite to the web 24, and about which it rotates.

The stud 21 is split to receive the bent inner end 29 of the helical spring D, the outer end of which is inserted in slots 30 in the rim 23, and bent back, as indicated at 3|.

A curved brake shoe 32 is located within the casing against the outer portion of the coiled leash A. It is connected by arms 33 extending through openings 34 in the casing, to a handle or pad 35 curved to lit the base of the thumb, or inner palm of the hand.

In use the snap hook 26 is fastened to the dogs collar and the casing taken in the hand somewhat in the fashion indicated in Fig. 1. As the dog runs the leash will be paid out, winding the reel against the resistance of the spring, unless and until the operator desires to check the dog, or limit his movements, when the brake 32 is applied to the outer turn of the coiled leash with suitable pressure. When the pull on the leash is released the return may be prevented by continuing appropriate braking pressure or the leash may be retracted by releasing the pressure, whereupon the spring D will wind the reel in the opposite direction and retract the leash to a suitable length.

The leash is shown broken away in Fig. 3, and the brake and the spring in positions they assume when more or less of the leash is withdrawn from the casing.

It will be clear from the illustration that the casing fits naturally into the users hand in the position for carrying it casually with the arm hanging to the side. The same position makes it easy to apply braking pressure and to grasp firmly the casing to. make sure that the dog does not jerk it away from the users hand. The grasping action naturally makes a firm grip on the casing while applying appropriate braking pressure with the base of the thumb or the inner palm of the hand.

The size, of course, will vary, but for a ten to twelve foot leash a casing roughly 2 in diameter and A., thick will be found suitable.

The leash is preferably, as shown, a flat strap, and can be conveniently made of braided material, woven material, leather and molded compositions. Sorne will prefer to have a positive stop at the inner end of the leash, and this can be accomplished by fastening a pin 36 in position to have its ends 31 catch just inside the nipple l5 when the leash is all run out.

The reel and the casing may be made of a, variety of materials but for lightness plastics are preferred. A Bakelite or Micarta casing with a sheet metal reel would have the advantage that there would be little friction and a minimum amount of lubrication would be required.

The arrangement is also very suitable for engineers tapes, etc.

I claim:

1. In a device of the class described, a reel, a leash wound on the reel, a casing in which the reel is rotatably mounted, a hollow nipple on the casing forming a passage for the leash, projections at each side of the nipple forming with it separate seats for the fingers, the casing being small enough to be grasped in one hand with the nipple between adjacent fingers.

2. In a device of the class described, a spring reel, a leash wound on the reel, a generally round, fiat-sided casing surrounding the reel and leash having a hollow nipple projecting outwardly from the periphery of the casing for the leash to run through, a brake for the leash comprising a shoe movable inwardly to applied position and a radially movable brake handle outside the casing and substantially diametrically opposite the nipple, the casing being of such shape and size that it can be held in one hand with the handle within and against a portion of said hand and be squeezed thereby to apply the brake.

3. In a device of the class described, a spring reel, a leash wound on the reel, a generally round, fiat-sided casing surrounding the reel and leash [having a hollow nipple projecting outwardly from the periphery of the casing for the leash to run through, projections at each side of the nipple forming with it separate seats for the fingers, a brake for the leash and a radially movable brake handle outside the casing and substantially diametrically opposite the nipple, the casing being of such size and shape that it can be held in one hand with the handle within and against a portion of said hand and be squeezed thereby to apply the brake.

4. In a device of the class described, a spring reel, a leash wound on the reel, a generally round, fiat-sided casing surrounding the reel and leash having a hollow nipple projecting outwardly from the periphery of the casing for the leash to run through, and brake means comprising a shoe movable into engagement with the outer winding of the leash, arms extending from the shoe through openings in the casing substantially diametrically opposite the nipple, and a handle connecting the arms outside the casing, the casing being of such size and shape that it can be held in one hand with the handle within and against a portion of said hand and be squeezed thereby to apply the brake.

5. In a device of the class described, a spring reel, a leash wound on the reel, a generally round, fiat-sided casing surrounding the reel and leash and having an opening in its periphery for the leash to run through, a brake for the leash with a brake handle outside the casing, said handle having a portion substantially diametrically opposite the opening and movable radially inwardly to apply said brake, said portion extending circumferentially of the reel and being of a length to subtend an appreciable angle at the center thereof, the casing being of such size and shape that it can be held in one hand with the opening between two of the fingers, the said handle portion being adapted to fit within the hand when the casing is so held and to be squeezed toward said casing by closing movement of said hand to apply the brake.

HUGH A. WILKINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2776644 *Jun 23, 1953Jan 8, 1957Richard E FontaineAnimal tethering device
US2792812 *Jun 17, 1955May 21, 1957Virgil H FrazierDog collar
US2817482 *Feb 2, 1955Dec 24, 1957Ninne Claire DeRetractable dog leash attachment for dog collars
US3036724 *Feb 2, 1959May 29, 1962Clark John HClam shell tag line assembly
US3088438 *Sep 5, 1961May 7, 1963Virginia W OliphantChild restrainer and harness
US3150843 *Mar 8, 1962Sep 29, 1964Cordoba BerniceMolded spring reel assembly
US3168312 *Oct 11, 1961Feb 2, 1965Davis Edward RAutomatic ball retrieving device
US3233591 *Oct 21, 1963Feb 8, 1966RogersExtensible reel type animal leash
US3481198 *Jul 15, 1964Dec 2, 1969Joseph S WilliamsA hydraulic responsive reel type exercising device
US4018189 *Dec 18, 1975Apr 19, 1977James Otis UmphriesRetractable dog leash
US4165713 *Nov 17, 1977Aug 28, 1979H.P.G. Iv, Inc.Retractable leash
US4269150 *Oct 1, 1979May 26, 1981Mccarthy Michael DDog leash
US4391226 *Jan 25, 1982Jul 5, 1983Guthrie Richard ADog leash
US4501230 *Jan 10, 1983Feb 26, 1985Talo Arnold TRetracting and locking animal leash
US4748937 *Jul 21, 1986Jun 7, 1988Musetti Louis JRetractable leash
US4903912 *Aug 12, 1988Feb 27, 1990Cooper Industries, Inc.Tape measure braking device
US5423494 *Jan 28, 1994Jun 13, 1995Daido Tokushuko Kabushiki KaishaPet rope winder
US5732898 *Jan 3, 1996Mar 31, 1998Gte Airfone IncorporatedCord reel assembly
US5762029 *Apr 29, 1996Jun 9, 1998Black & Decker Inc.Combined retractable leash and flashlight
US6082308 *Jun 21, 1999Jul 4, 2000Walter; Glen VailAnimal restraining device
US6405683Aug 24, 1999Jun 18, 2002Eleven, LlcRetractable leash assembly
US6694922Jun 18, 2002Feb 24, 2004Eleven, LlcRetractable leash assembly
US6792893Jan 28, 2003Sep 21, 2004Diane Ellen QuinteroRetractable two-pet leash
US6845736 *Aug 2, 2002Jan 25, 2005Paul G. AndersonRetractable tether for animals
US6845737Nov 10, 2003Jan 25, 2005Larry Shane AustinCombination ball and dog leash
US6929209 *Jul 14, 2003Aug 16, 2005David BaumgartenSelf-orienting retractable ID card holder
WO1997025270A1 *Dec 30, 1996Jul 17, 1997Gte Airfone IncImproved cord reel assembly
WO2009144579A1 *May 27, 2009Dec 3, 2009Sanypet S.P.A.Leash for domestic animals
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/377, D30/153, 242/381.2, 242/405.3, 242/381.6, 242/381.3
International ClassificationA01K27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01K27/004
European ClassificationA01K27/00C1