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Publication numberUS2252936 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1941
Filing dateMar 5, 1938
Priority dateMar 5, 1938
Publication numberUS 2252936 A, US 2252936A, US-A-2252936, US2252936 A, US2252936A
InventorsCharles P Leydecker
Original AssigneeCharles P Leydecker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of balancing a foot within a shoe
US 2252936 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1941. c. P. LEYDECKER -METHOD OF BALANING A FOOT WITHIN A SHOE I2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed March 5, 1958 Hrm/@msn Aug. l19, 1941.

C. P. LEYDECKER METHOD OF BALANCING A FOOT WITHIN A SHOE 2 Sheets-Sheet '2 Filed March 5, -1958 Mm Q Mi.

K nt /A/L/EA/TOE: cf/AeLfs R LEYDECKEE,

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HTTOIQNEK Patented Aug. 19, 1941 y UNITED STATES PATENT oEFjlcE-f I i i Charles P. Leydecker, St. Louis, Mo. Application March 5, 193s, serial NQ, 194,021A

- claims. gol. 12-142) The, present invention relates generally to shoes, and more particularly toa method for effecting foot balance .within a shoe, and meansforachieving such balance. u l l l The present invention is` predicated upon the theory that there is only one longitudinal bone v arch in the foot construction when the heel bone or os calcis is raised above the plane of the forepart of the foot, the main columns or supports of which comprise the os calcis and the forward portion of the first metatarsal. Many authorities aver that there are three or four arches in the longitudinal dimentlon of thefoot; but a study of the bones in the feet shows that the many bones which comprise a foot when in the just stated relationship make up one complete arch, some parts of which are concave and some parts of which are convex, but all of which contribute to the one single arch.

Modern shoe construction has resulted in the dropping of certain bones of the foot, notably the cuboid and the fifth metatarsal, so that the rear portion of the fifth metatarsal contacts the shoe in walking at a point below a plane through the bottom of the os calcis and the forward portion of the first metatarsal. This, however, is not a natural position. This lowering of the enumerated bones of the feet has been caused by constructing shoes with heels, which, of course, raises the position of the os calcis relative to the forward portion of the first metatarsal, In ladies shoes the base of the fifth metatarsal actually slides downwardly along the steep shank thereof at each step.

Many devices have been devised in an effort to compensate for the position of the bones inthe foot in this man-made position relative to the ground; and none of them` has been singularly successful. Many have concentrated on supporting the inner side of the foot at the center of the arch` by means which are generally designated arch supports.

However, few have lseriously considered the outer side of the longitudinal arch which, in the final analysis, is the primary weight carrier of the foot. Experiment has shown that the weight of the body in walking is carried from the os calcis, or heel bone, las one main support along a substantially curved line through the cuboid and the fifth metatarsal to the forward portion of the first metatarsal as the second main support. In other words, in Walking, the weight of the body is distributed along the outer edge of the foot in an arc of a circle from the heel bone to the forward portion of the first metatarsal.

The forward portions of the fifth, fourth,` third and second metatarsals assist to only a minor degree `this weight transfer from the base of the fifth metatarsal tothe forward portion of "the first metatarsal whenthe os calcis and the forward portion of the first metatarsal are on the same plane, but when the former is raised relative to the latter by high heels their weight shifting function increases greatly. The foot has a tendency to roll, which is a balanced movement when the heel is not maintained raised relative to the metatarsals.

Before proceeding, it should be observed here that the lower portion or supporting surface of the os calcis is not fiat, but is rounded and has a tuberosity on the outer side. To prevent all wobbling of the foot in walking, a support is necessary beneath the tuberosity where high heel shoes are worn, which changes the general relationship of the bones of the foot.

As the weight is shifted forwardly in walking, the base of the fifth metatarsal, which is, in effect, a marked protuberance, assists in the forward shifting thereof by contact with the walking surface. However, when the heel bone is elevated, the base of the fifth metatarsal is likewise relatively elevated and, to contact the walking surface, must drop a greater degree, which results in straining the main longitudinal arch, inasf much as the bone structure must give to allow this unnatural ultimate position of the base of the fifth metatarsal, This dropping downwardly of the rear portion of the fth metatarsal accentuates the rolling weight distribution throughout the foot `and results in the outward turning over of the shoe which is one of the greatest wear points in modern shoe construction. The majority of shoes, after being worn a short while,

` show this overturning outwardly of the upper fili over the edge of the sole. The present invention contemplates correcting this distorted action of vthe bone structure by providing a natural support for the front and rear portions of the fifth metatarsal and the front portions of the fourth, third, and second metatarsals which will alleviate strain in the foot and save this undue overturning of the shoes outwardly.

The above noted undue lowering of the outside bone structure of the foot, resultant of raising the heel relative to the forward portion of the first metatarsal, strains the whole foot structure and causes tiring of an individual prematurely. Only when the foot is properly balanced is the circulation of the blood normal and can the blood enter and leave the pedal extremity without straining the heart. There are nerves passing through the feet which transmit the proper amount of nerve impulses when the circulation is normal, and quite obviously impoverished circulation will lead to subnormal nerve impulses and resultant impaired activity of the feet. Lengthy experiments have proved that a foot housed in a shoe constructed in line with the present invention has normal blood circulation. Wearers of such shoes have been able to with-f stand very substantially'greater strains` in usage of the feet than when wearing shoes of conventional design and construction.

Therefore, an object of the present invention is to provide a method of balancing a foot within a shoe to reduce bone and muscle strain and to prevent the outward overturning of the shoe upper over the edge of the sole.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig, 1 is a plan View of the sole assembly of a shoe showing one exemplication of the present invention in position on the inner sole, the bones of a foot being shown in dotted lines;

' Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the shoe sole assemblage, exemplifrcation of the present invention, and foot bones shown in Fig. 1;

' Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3-.-,3 of Fig. 1;

` Fig; 4 is a section on the line 4.-4 of Fig.1;

Fig.,5 is;l a perspective view of one of the elements of the device comprising the subject matter of the present invention;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a second element of the device comprising the present invention;

Fig. 7. a side elevation similar to Fig. 2 showlng anotherlexemplification of the present invention, the heel of the sole assembly being of a greater height than the heel shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a section on the line 8--8 of Fig. '7;

Fig. 9 isa perspective view of a third element of a device comprising the sub-ject matter of the present invention;

Fig. 10 is a perspective View of a fourth element of a device comprising the subject matter of the present invention; and,

Fig. 11 is a section on the line I I--II of Fig. 1.

Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference numerals, there is shown in Figs. 1,-4 one exempliflcation of the present invention in the form of the insert I disposed in operative relation to a sole assemblage I6 of a shoe, bones I1 being shown by dotted lines in a normal relation thereto.

The sole assemblage I6 is part of a womans shoe and includes an outer sole I8, an inner solef I9, and a relatively low heel 2D.

s efore passing to a more detailed consideration of the insert i 5 formingthe subject matter of the present invention, it is well to point out the several more important of the foot bones I1 shown in dotted lines. The foot bones I1 include an os calcis 22 having a -tuberosity 23, an astrag-alus 2,4, a cuboid 25, and the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth metatarsals 26, 21, 28, 29, and 30, respectively, which include front portions 3|, 32, 33, 34, and .35, respectively, and rear portions or bases 36, 31, 38, 39, and 40, respectively (Figs. 1 and `2).

The insert I5 includes an upper element 43 and a lower element 44 (Figs. 5 and 6, respectively). The element 43 is of a general configuration shown in Fig. 5, and is of substantially the length of the inner sole I9, as can be appre- Qafd from @n nspton Q Fg- 1- It ha@v an outer edge 45, which follows the contour of the outer edge of the inner sole I9, and an inner edge 46. The element 43 is beveled at 41 adjacent the edge 46 and includes a reduced hooked portion 48 which is adapted to extend around the base of the os calcis 22 and to receive thereon or wedged thereagainst the tuberosity 23 thereof. The element 43 is of substantially uniform thickness, being biplanar when in flat form.

The element 44 is of the general configuration shown in Fig. 6 and includesan outer edge 56, which follows the contour of the inner sole I9, and an inner edge 5I. The element 44 is beveled forwardly at 5,2 and at 53 adjacent the edge 5I. As can be appreciated from Figs. 3 and 4, the element 44 slopes slightly from the outer edge 5I! towards the bevel 53 for a purpose to be described. A reduced rear extremity 54 is beveled at 55. In Fig. 1, the element 44 is shown in dotted lines beneath the element 43.

Referring to Figs. 'l and 8, .there is shown a modified insert or device 66 which is adapted to be used with a sole assemblage .6l having a higher heel than the sole assemblage I6. The sole assemblage 6I includes an outer sole 62, an inner sole 63, and a heel 64.` Thefoot bones I1 are shown in the same relation Aas they are shown in Figs. 1-4, with the exception that the os calcis is on a higher levelrelative to the forward portion of the first metatarsal ln Figs. 7 and 8 Ythan in Figs.14. o

The insert 60 differs from the insert I5 bythe inclusion of additional elements .65 and66, velements 61 and 6B being identical with the elements 44 and 43, respectively.

The element 65 is of the configuration shown in Fig. 16 and is .of biplanar construction. It is beveled forwardlyvat 69, rearwardly at 10,'and along the inner side at 1I.

The element 66 is of the configuration shown in Fig. 9 and is beveled along the front, the inner side, and the rear at 12, 13, and 14, respectively. The relationship of the elements 65, 66, 61, and 68 in their formation of the insert 66 is clearly lshown in Fig. 7.

In use, the device forming the subject matter of the present invention, be it the insert I5 or 60, is placed in-a shoe on the inner soleand below the sock lining along the outer side thereof.

This can be readily seen .byy an inspection of Fig.

1. When the shoe has a relatively low heel, as the heel 20, the insert I5 is employed.

When in the shoe, the hooked portion 48 extends partially around the os calcis22 and receives either in wedging relation thereagainst or directly thereupon thetuberosity 23 of the os calcis 22. The lfthmetatarsal 30 is raised both at the base 46 and at the forward portion 35 (Fig. 2). Further, the forwardv portions 34, 33, and 32 of the fourth,lthird, and second metatarsalsl are raised to the degree shown in Fig. V3. The metatarsals arethus elevated relative to the inner sole I9 so that, in walking, theweight is easily and evenly shifted from the os calcis through the base 40 of the fifth metatarsal `3l) to the forward portion 3| of the first metatarsal 26, the forward portions 35, 34, 33, and 32 of the fth, fourth, third, and second metatarsals assisting in the transfer of the weight from the` base 40 of the fifth metatarsal 30 to the forward portion 3| of the first metatarsal 26.

Referring to Figs. '7 and 8, theinsert is disposed on the inner sole 63 in the same relative position as the insert I5 is on the inner sole I9. rlhe insert 60, however, includes the additional elements 65 and 66 in order to build up the shoe to raise the forward portions 35, 34,133, and 32 of the fifth, fourth, third, and second metatarsals e proportionate amount in order to compensate for the additional height of the heel 64. This must -be done because the base of the os calcis is on a higher level relative to the forward portion 3l of the first metatarsal 26 when it rests on the heel 64 than when it rests on the heel 20.

It is thus apparent that there has been worked out a device for securing proper foot balance which is of a greater thickness in that area around the forward portions of the fifth, fourth, third, and second metatarsals when applied to a shoe having a relatively high heel than when applied to a shoe having a relatively low heel. In other words, a ratio of thickness has been established for what may be termed the critical area. The invention, therefore, contemplates the varying of the thickness of the device in this critical area so that the forward portions of the fifth, fourth, third, `and second metatarsals properly assist in easing the weight forwardly from the base of the fifth metatarsal to the forward portion of the first metatarsal when walking.

It is to be understood that the present foot balancing device can be constructed of one piece cut to a proper configuration. It has been found,

however, that the use of several elements facilitates the securing of the proper relative thickness for the critical area. The invention contemplates the use of any suitable material, such as leather, and the like.

It is to be understood that the foregoing description and accompanying drawings have been given by way of illustration and example and not for purposes of limitation, the invention being limited only by the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of properly locating a foot within a conventional shoe comprising wedging the tuberosity of the os calcis to prevent wobbling at the heel, elevating the base of the fifth metatarsal relative to the surface of the inner sole of the shoe, and elevating the forward portions of the fifth, fourth, third, and second metatarsals predetermined amounts relative to the surface of the inner sole of the shoe.

2. A method of properly locating a foot within a conventional shoe comprising elevating the base of the fifth metatarsal relative to the surface of the inner sole, and elevating the forward portion of the fifth metatarsal a greater distance above the surface of the inner sole-than the base thereof is elevated.

3. A method of properly locating a foot within a conventional shoe comprising elevating the base of the fifth metatarsal relative to the surface of the inner sole, elevating the forward portion of the fifth metatarsal a greater distance above the surface of the inner sole than the base thereof is elevated, and elevating the forward portions of the fourth, third and second metatarsals in proportionate degree to the Velevation of the fifth metatarsal to ease the weight shifting from the base of the fifth metatarsal to the forward portion of the first metatarsal.

4. A method of properly locating a foot within a conventional shoe comprising elevating the base of the fifth metatarsal relative to the surface of the inner sole, elevating the forward portion of the fifth metatarsal a greater distance above the surface of the inner sole than the base thereof is elevated, elevating the forward portions of the fourth, third and second metatarsals in proportionate degree to the elevation of the fifth metatarsal to ease the weight shifting from the base of the fifth metatarsal to the forward portion of the first metatarsal, and wedging the tuberosity of the os calcis to prevent wobbling and to assist forward transfer of weight.

5. A method of properly locating a foot within a conventional shoe comprising .elevating the base of the fifth metatarsal relative to the surface of the inner sole, elevating the forward portion of the fifth metatarsal relative to the surface of the inner sole, and elevating the forward portions of the fourth, third and second metatarsals in proportionate degree to the elevation of the fifth metatarsal to ease the Weight shifting from the base of the fifth metatarsal to the forward portion of the first metatarsal.

CHARLES P. LEYDECKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425837 *Sep 4, 1944Aug 19, 1947William M SchollCuboid support and heel retainer
US2628440 *Feb 12, 1951Feb 17, 1953Charles P LeydeckerFoot balancing means
US4686993 *Jul 26, 1985Aug 18, 1987Paragon Podiatry LaboratoriesLow profile functional orthotic
US6026599 *Feb 17, 1998Feb 22, 2000Blackwell; Terry DeanPseudo-planar insole insert
US6953338 *Jan 19, 2001Oct 11, 2005Steag Rtp Systems GmbhDevice for thermal treatment of substrates
US8166674May 1, 2012Hbn Shoe, LlcFootwear sole
US8683717 *Dec 1, 2010Apr 1, 2014Douglas H. Richie, Jr.Support for inclusion in article of footwear and method for raising the arch of a person's foot
US20040029065 *Jan 19, 2001Feb 12, 2004Uwe KreiserDevice for thermal treatment of substrates
US20110023324 *Aug 3, 2009Feb 3, 2011Dananberg Howard JFootwear sole
US20110126427 *Dec 1, 2010Jun 2, 2011Richie Jr Douglas HSupport for inclusion in article of footwear and method for raising the arch of a person's foot
USD383894Dec 22, 1995Sep 23, 1997Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc.Insole
WO2011092728A1 *Jan 27, 2011Aug 4, 2011Calzaturificio Carmens S.P.A.Method for manufacturing high-comfort shoes and shoes manufactured using the method
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/142.00N, 36/178
International ClassificationA43B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/1435, A43B7/1445, A43B7/14, A43B7/141, A43B7/142
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20F, A43B7/14A10, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A20A, A43B7/14