Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2253250 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1941
Filing dateFeb 6, 1939
Priority dateFeb 6, 1939
Publication numberUS 2253250 A, US 2253250A, US-A-2253250, US2253250 A, US2253250A
InventorsSelig Milton
Original AssigneeFischman Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sterilizing and storage cabinet
US 2253250 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

STERILIZING AND STORAGE CABINET 7 Filed Feb. 6, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet l Au 19, 1941. MSEUG '2 2,253,250

STERILIZ ING AND STORAGE CABINET Filed Feb. 6 1939 v 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 19, 1941 M. SELIG 2,253,250

STERILIZING AND STORAGE CABINET Filed Feb. 6, 1959 a Sheets-Sheet s Patented Aug. 19, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENTUFFICET STERILIZING AND STORAGE CABINET Milton Selig, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor to The Fischman Company, a corporation of Delaware Application February 6, 1939, Serial No. 254,930

25 Claims.

The present invention relates to cabinets for storing and sterilizing articles of various kinds, especially articles of tableware such as beverage glasses and the like, and more particularly contemplates certain desirable improvements in cabinets of the general type disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 227,562, filed August 30, 1938, now issued as United States Letters Patent No. 2,146,688.

Important objects of the'present invention are to improve the structure and mode of operation able and foolproof.

An additional object is to prolong the life of the lamps which serve as the sources of sterilizing radiations,'and related to this object is the provision of means by which the lamps remain constantly energized, so that sterilization proceeds without interruption, as long as the main switch remains closed, even during the operations of inserting and removing the articles. accomplished without danger to the operator or bystanders, and the elimination of the interruptions to the sterilizing processobviously expedites that process, thus increasing the efficiency and capacity of the present cabinet.

Other objects and advantages of the novel construction will be apparent from the following description of certain preferred forms of embodiment herein selected to illustrate the invention.

The structure disclosed in my co-pending application hereinabove identified comprises a cabinet or the like designed to sterilize articles of tableware, such as beverage glasses and the like, in full view of the consumer to whom the articles are intended to be served. To this end, the cabinet is preferably of small size and neat appearance and is adapted ,to be mounted on a counter, back bar or the like of a restaurant, soda fountain or similar establishment.

The cabinet is designed to receive a plurality of articles and subject them to some sterilizing 1nfiuence, preferably ultraviolet radiations. Provision is made for inserting thearticles to be steri- This is I lized through a certain opening in the cabinet wall and for removing the sterilized articles through another opening. The articles are moved in a path through the cabinet which extends from the inlet to the outlet or discharge opening thereof, and it is during this passage along the path that they are subjected, to sterilization.

Manifestly, it is of importance that thedevice be arranged to constrain the operator to insert the articles through the opening therefor provided and to require him to remove the articles from the cabinet only through the discharge opening after the articles have been sterilized. The cabinet would be of inferior utility if it were possible or at least easy for a carelessoperator to remove articles from it before they had been passed completely through the sterilizing cycle.

In the cabinet disclosed in my co-pending application, a door is provided for the inlet opening, and with this door there are associated a latch and a switch. The latch functions to hold the door closed, and the switch closes the circuit to the sterilizing ray bulbs. The arrangement is such that the door becomes latched before sterilization can begin, and the door cannot be unlatched until the newly inserted articles have been moved along the sterilizing cycle to a point where removal from the cabinet is impossible except after completion of the cycle.

It has been found that in practice careless op- -erators are sometimes. inclined to avoid closing the door fully to latched position. Of course in such case the circuit to the bulbs is not closed and sterilization does not take place, but if this fact be unnoticed by the customer or by the operators superior the operator can reopen the door and remove the unsterilized articles through the in- One of the principal objects of the present improvement is to defeat these possibilities by constraining careless operators to employ the cabinet in the manner intended and necessary for effective sterilization. This is accomplished in the illustrated embodiment by preventing insertion through the outlet opening and by making it extremely difficult, if not practically impossible,

for articles inserted through the inlet opening to be removed therethrough.

In the original cabinet movement of the inlet door to open position opened the circuit to the lamps, so that sterilizing ceased and possibly harmful radiations from the lamps could not escape from the cabinet. For this arrangement the present invention substitutes continuously energized lamps, so that the sterilizing cycle is not interrupted during the operation of inserting articles to be sterilized, but the escape of radiations from the cabinet through the inlet opening when the door therefor is open is effectively prevented, so that no real or fancied injury can result to the operator or others by reason of their being subjected to escaped radiations.

The foregoing is accomplished by means which shields the opening from the continuously emanating radiations but which nevertheless subjects to intense radiations the initial zone of the path through which the articles move. It will be appreciated that this zone, necessarily located immediately adjacent to the inlet opening, and therefore close to the outer air and the operators hands, and containing as it does articles having a greater degree of contamination than any other articles in the cycle or path, stands in greatest need of intense sterilizing efficiency.

The continual making and breaking of the circuit to the bulbs in the original cabinet had the effect of shortening the life of the bulbs. These bulbs are comparatively expensive and are the only parts of the structure which normally require replacement. A distinct advantage in point of cost of operation is therefore gained by the present improvement in which the bulbs are energized continuously, as long as the main switch remains closed, so that their life -is materially prolonged. Incidentally, the efficiency of each sterilizing cycle is increased, or the time length of the cycle is shortened, by the continuous energization of the bulbs.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, which will be apparent as the description hereinafter proceeds, the accompanying drawings illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention which has given satisfactory and reliable results in exhaustive tests and actual service. In these drawings, which form part of this application for letters patent and in which the same reference character designates the same part in the several views- Figure 1 is a perspective view of a cabinet constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention specifically designed for the sterilization and storage of beverage glasses;

Fig. 2 is a detail front elevational view of the cabinet;

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross sectional view taken through the partition at one end of the cabinet, looking toward the interior thereof; and

Fig. 4 is a detail view of one of the clips.

Referring now to the drawings and first to Fig. 1, the device contemplated by the invention includes a cabinet I, preferably made of finished metal, such as stainless steel, enameled sheet metal, glass or the like, designed to have an ornamental appearance and therefore adapted to be mounted on a soda fountain, bar or the like, as has been explained. The cabinet is defined by any appropriate number of walls which provide an internal chamber generally designated 2. This chamber constitutes a path for articles to be sterilized. The path may be regarded as extending from a path floor 3 horizontally disposed somewhat above thebottom wall 4 of the cabinet, and a path ceiling 5 horizontally disposed somewhat below the roof 6 of the cabinet. In this space between the floor 3 and ceiling 5 and the respectively adjacent bottom 4 and roof 6 of the cabinet a plurality of sterilizing instrumentalities are disposed. In the illustrated embodiment these instrumentalities are ultraviolet bulbs of familiar form, capable of being purchased in the open market. The floor 3 and ceiling 5 are pervious to the radiations of the bulbs, by reason of their being made of coarse, open mesh metal. They may be made of raypervious glass or equivalent material. They serve as guards to protect the frangible bulbs and their mountings.

The cabinet is best made with the chamber 2 generally upright or vertical, and the wall means defining the cabinet is provided with a pair of openings respectively for insertion and removal of articles to be sterilized. In the illustrated embodiment the front wall 8 of the cabinet has a lower inlet opening 9 and an upper outlet opening Ill. The inlet opening is provided with a door ll, hereinafter more particularly described.

The articles to be sterilized are placed on racks or trays I2, which are of such size and proportions that one of them can be passed into the chamber through the inlet opening 9 to rest on the floor 3 and substantially fill the zone of the path opposite the inlet opening. The floor 3 is skeletonized, being made of a few rightangularly related lengths of thin bar stock or the like, and conveniently the ends of a pair of the bar elements project from the chamber 2 through slots l3 in each of the two internal end walls M of the chamber. Between each wall I4 and the adjacent outer wall of the cabinet a comparatively narrow space is provided. In this space a plate l5 connects the projecting rod ends of the floor 3 with a chain or the like l6 which is trained upwardly and thence forwardly over a pair of pulleys II to terminate in an anchorage in a handle member l8. Small openings [9 in the front wall of the cabinet pass the chain.

When the chain is pulled through these openings the floor 3 of the elevator which has just been described rises to elevate the rack 12 which is resting on it.

The elevation of the lowermost tray I2 to substantially the limit permitted by the height of the slots I3 snaps the floor of the tray, or the side rails which define the floor, past the cam surfaces 20 and onto the shoulder surfaces 21 of a set of holding clips 22 which are biased into the chamber as by spring means 23. In Fig. 3 a rack or tray is shown supported on these clips 22, while a lower tray rests on the floor 3 of the elevating means. It will be noted that the tray Whlch is supported by the clips is opposite an imperforate portion of the front wall 8, so that articles on such tray cannot be removed directly from the cabinet. This tray supports a topmost tray, which is opposite the outlet opening I 0. Articles on this tray can be removed from the cabinet, or the entire tray can be Withdrawn through the opening Ill. The articles on the topmost tray have passed throughthe sterilizing cycle during the time between insertion of the tray onto the floor 3 and its subsequent elevation through the intermediate position to the end of the path opposite the outlet opening ID.

The door H for the inlet opening is hinged by the pintle 24 in bracket bearings 25 which are mounted on the front wall of th'e'casing between the inlet and outlet "openings. Fast at $253,250 eats end of thepii-itle it is 3 a ratchet wheel 26 housed in an enlargement 21 of each bracket 25 "andpenetrating respectively the spaces between 'each internal wail of the'chamber and the adjacent external wall of the cabinet. Th teeth "of these ratchet wheels are directed to cooperate with'adogor pawl 28 pivoted at 29 to the "fulcrumof a lever 30 whose opposite end is provioled withan opening large enough to pass the chain It buttoo small to pass a horizontally directed ear 3| which serves as the anchorage for the chain on theplate t5. A stop or abutment 32 maybe carried by the inner wall 14 at "each side of the chamber for limiting the drop of the lever "30. If desiredyan adjustable "screw 33*surrounded by a 'coil'spring 34 acting inftension between'the end of the pawl 28 and an abutment 35 carried by the lever 30 maybe used to bias the pawl into engagement with the ratchet teeth, or gravity may be relied on to eiiect this engagement.

The direction of the ratchet teeth is such as toprevent movement of the door II in opening directionwhile permitting the door to move in closing direction. A spring or the like 36 reacts between' the door and some adjacent fixed part such as the front wall8 of the cabinet to urge the door toopen position. A keeper 31 may be positioned at each opposite side of the lower portionof the front wall 8 to receive a latch "bar '38 "to hold the door in completely closed position. It willbe evident that this function is performedalso by the pawl and ratchet zneans, but I'd'eem it expedient to add the latch 31-38150 relieve the pawl and ratchet of injurious stresses which might result from attempts to open the door. by pulling on its lower edge. It will be appreciated that such pulls exert a considerable leverage at the engaged pawl and "ratchet, but substantially no leverage at the latch.

The upper ends "of the latch bar 38 is conn'ected to the lever '30. It will be evident that Whenthe elevator is raised sufficiently to seat a lowermost traiy l2 on the supports 22 the ear '3! engages and lifts the lever '30 to withdraw the latchbar 38. from the keeper 3'! and disengage the pawl "28 from the ratchet wheel 26,

180 to abut rubber bumpers or the like 39 op- .posite the discharge opening I0 and substantially closethat opening. Release of the handle causes the; elevating means to drop to its lowermost position, thereby raising the handle and seating the pawl 28,in engagement with the teeth of the ratchet whee1'26.

The lower zone of the chamber is thereby emptied. Articles on the tray in the intermediate position cannot be removed directly from the cabinet. Articles on the uppermost tray can be withdrawn from the cabinet through the outlet opening. It if the door ll be swung from its position obstructingthat opening. It is practically necessary to swing the door down through approximately 90 to permit these articles to be removed. The action of the pawl and ratchet means prevents subsequent lifting of the door from this position. The operator may proceed to empty the uppermost tray, drrem'ove 'that tray from thecabinet. *Iflremin order to iohtain more articles from the cabinet, he a tray into the lower zone 01 ithechamber and actuate the elevating means to cause that-tray to lift the tray in thei-ntermediate position to uppermost position, whereupon articles "on the latter tray are :made available *to him. The operator fin'ds'it inconvenient to swing the door down merely enough topassanartiele or a tra-y "from the cabinet through the outlet opening; since in suchposition'the door projects right angularly from-thecaibinet front wall-where 'it is very apt to be in the operators way. He finds it much more "convenient to swing the door fully d'ownor nearly fully-down,-where it will not be in' hi's way, but the action of the pawl and ratchet keeps the doordown to the angle to which it has been "closed and prevents being swung back up. The operator knows that if he swings the door "down much :past the horizontal he will not be able to insert a tray into the cabinet through "the inlet opening, and he knows also that such insertion must be made eventually in order to move a tray and its articles intothe uppermost position where he can reach them. The practical effect is therefore that the operator soon acquires the habit of inserting a fresh "tray through the inlet opening as soonas the door opens and before he swings the door down to uncover the outlet opening. The door is then swung entirely down, where 'it is out of the operators way. Even though it shouldnot be closed sufficiently to become latched 'by the'means 3 i-38, it will be closed to-astifficien't degree to prevent withdrawal of the newly inserted tray through the inlet opening, "because it cannot be raised until the pawl "is released "from theratchet wheelby reason of elevation of the new tray "into the inaccessible intermediate position.- 'In'thisway, glasses or thelike once inserted "through "the inlet opening must 'be moved through the sterilizing 'cyclebe'forethey canbe removed.

In spite of the foregoing constraints, ithas beenfoundthat careless or recalcitrant opera- "tors will in somecases *be tempted to insetta trap into the cabinet .throug'h'the outlet opening and immediatelv'pro'ceed to remove articles thereof at the zone of thedischarge opening 10.

The clips '40 however, are horizontally rather than vertically directed, "with their shoulders forwardly and their 'cam faces rearwardly dis- 'posed. They are set well backfrom the plane .ofthe front wall'8 and its opening [0. .Theitrays are conveniently provided 'withvertical side posts in suitable numbergas for "examplefour 'injthe illustrated embodimentfwhich 'ride past "thecam faces of the clips when the tray is withdrawn, but which would'be obstructedby the shoulders of the clips in anyattempt to insert "the tray through the outlet opening. lt willlbe conceded that it is possible 'for the operator to defeat the purpose of the "clips by holding them retracted by a pair of thinbladed instruments ffishe'd in between the two "internal walls of the bhaniber and'the adjacentsides dfthetray whitih little if any injurious effect.

he is attempting to insert, but this operation is vastly more difficult and complicated than insertion of a tray through the inlet opening and actuation of the handle I8.

Somewhat similar clips or the like 42 may be used for the same purpose in the lower zone of the chamber, opposite the inlet opening 9. Obviously, the clips 42 will be reversed with respect to the clips 40 so that the posts 4| of an incoming tray will ride over their cam portions, while their shoulders would abut those posts and prevent withdrawal of the tray through theopening 9. The lower portion of each clip 42 is best beveled or cammed downwardly and outwardly, as shown at 42 in Figs. 4 and 2, so that the clips will be pushed back by the horizontal side members of the lower tray as that tray is elevated. The operator is thus discouraged and practically prevented from leaving the door ll open after inserting a tray through the opening 9 and proceeding todispense articles from that tray. Should he attempt this procedure, he soon finds that the emptied tray cannot be withdrawn directly to be filled with fresh articles, but must be passed through the intermediate and ultimate positions, and the operator promptly concludes that it is considerably easier to operate the full lower tray through these successive positions and dispense its contents through the outlet opening after the tray reaches the end of the sterilizing cycle provided for it. It is found in actual practice that no attempts are made by any operators to misuse the present cabinet.

It is desirable to prevent escape of ultra-violet rays which might strike the eye of a person in the vicinity of the cabinet. Direct rays from the upper bulbs-are, for most localities in which the cabinet will be used, well shielded by the front wall 8 at the margin of the upper opening l0, supplemented if desired by a visor 43'. The proportions of these several parts may be selected so that the only direct rays from the upper bulbs which can escape through the upper opening will be downwardly directed at such a steep inclination that they cannot strike the eye of any person occupying any normal position and posture about the cabinet. Of course, all or. any number of the internal walls defining the chamber may be and preferably are provided with reflecting surfaces, which incidentally may be corrugated longitudinally, transversely :or otherwise with respect to the bulbs to diffuse and disperse the radiations in any desired way throughout the chamber, and rays may be reflected from these surfaces through the upper opening in horizontal or upwardly inclined directions. These reflected rays, however, have It will be noted, moreover, that during .a large period of the operation of the cabinet many of these reflected rays pass through the articles in the upper Zone, if these, articles be transparent as in the case of the illustrated beverage glasses A, and such passage further reduces their harmful effect.

When the cabinet is to be used at levels somewhat higher than usual, the upper opening may be provided with a closure of metal, glass or other material substantially opaque to the dangerous wavelengths. Such a door 58, substituted in Fig. 1 for the visor 43, may be freely hinged along its top edge to the front wall of i the cabinet above the upper opening and may have a lower handle or finger hole by which it withdrawn. Gravity, of course, keeps such a door normally closed.

The shading of the lower opening from radiations directly emanating from the lower bulbs presents a more diflicult problem. As has been seen, the bulbs continue to be energized while the door H is open. The lower zone of the chamber, and particularly that portion of it which is immediately inside the inlet opening, is most vulnerable to contamination, since outside air is continually entering it and since the articles in it are at best only partially sterilized. Efficient operation therefore requires that this zone be subjected to intense sterilization, while the safety of persons close to the cabinet requires that substantially no direct rays be permitted to escape upwardly through the adjacent opening.

The present invention solves the problem by disposing one of the preferably plural lower bulbs close to the front wall 8 of the cabinet below the bottommost position of a tray in the chamber, as shown at the left hand side of Fig. 3, and by associating with the bulb a reflecting shield 13. This shield partially surrounds its bulb and has a curved upper portion terminating in an edge M which is so related to the bulb surface and the lower opening that, as shown in Fig. 3, no direct ray from the bulb can escape through said opening. The proportions of the tray and chamber are preferably such that all of the beverage glass or other article on the tray and nearest the opening lies in the path of direct rays. Such rays have intense sterilizing effect, so that the zone of the chamber immediately inside the lower opening, where efficient sterilization is most needed, is subjected to radiations of highest effectiveness.

The rear or inner portion of the reflecting shield 43 is extended backwardly and preferably upwardly, as shown at 45, and has a reflecting surface so that rays impinging on it will be sent upwardly through the pervious floor 3 and the bottom of the tray and on to or through the articles on the tray. If a plurality of bulbs be used in the lower portion of the cabinet, each of them is provided with a reflecting shield like that which has been described, and the forward edge of each shield is arranged to shade the opening while permitting a maximum amount of radiation to strike the articles on the tray. Preferably the rear portion 45 of each anterior shield rises to the forward edge of the adjacent posterior shield, and these portions 45 may be dished, corrugated crosswise or lengthwise of the associated bulb, or otherwise fashioned to give any desired reflecting effect.

in the illustrated embodiment two lower bulbs are shown, but it will be understood that these bulbs may be provided in any convenient number which will depend on the power of the bulbs, the degree of sterilizing intensity desired, and other factors, as will be understood.

The several bulbs are socketed in the internal walls of the chamber, and wiring connections are made in the space between the internal and external wall at each side of the cabinet. These spaces may also contain any appropriate appurtenances of the circuit, such as transformer, safety switch and the like. Various refinements of arrangement may be incorporated for safety and convenience of operation and servicing. For example, in the physical embodiment which I have made and tested, opening the hinged top of the cabinet automatically opens the bulb ciraccommodate articles glasses. In all of these modifications, however,

.cuits and permits the outer walls of the cabinet tobe slid upwardly in channels in the corner posts I of the cabinet, so that access may be had to the sockets, wiring and accessory instrumentalities,

as wellas the elevator mechanism and all other parts contained in the side spaces.

A main switch may be provided anywhere on the cabinet, as will be understood.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention is hand operated, accommodates three trays or racks, moves these trays upwardly, and is specifically designed to handle beverage glasses.

Manifestly the invention may be embodied in other cabinet structures which may differ in numerous respects. For example, the elevator mechanism may be power operated, more tray-s may be accommodated, they may be moved downwardly or laterally, and changes may be made to other than beverage the, inventive features of the herein illustrated structure are capable of being embodied, and all of them are therefore deemed to be within the scope and purview of the appended claims.

Iclaim:

1. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means forming a chamber having an inlet opening for a tray bearing said articles and an outlet opening through which said tray may be withdrawn from the chamber, means in the chamber for sterilizing said articles, a door for closing the inlet opening, ratchet mechanism normally preventing movement of the door in opening direction, means for moving a tray in the chamber from a point op-- posite the inlet opening toward the outlet opening, and an element cooperating with said mechanism and tray-moving means and operable in response to movement of said tray by said traymoving means to release said mechanism where. i by the door may be moved toward open position.

2. A'cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles I of tableware or the like comprising wall means forming a chamber having an inlet opening for a tray bearing said articles and an outlet opening through which said tray may be withdrawn from the chamber, means in the chamber for sterilizing said articles, a door for closing the inlet opening, means'biasing the door toward open position, ratchet mechanism normally preventing movement of the door in opening direction, means for moving a tray inthe chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening toward the outlet opening,

and an element cooperating with said mechanism and tray-moving means for releasing said mechanism'responsive to movement of said tray by said tray-moving means whereby the door is moved toward open position by said biasing means.

3. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means forming a chamber having an inlet opening for a tray bearing said articles and an outlet openmoving means to release said pawl and ratchet mechanism whereby the door may be moved to open position.

4. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means defining a chamber having an initial position zone and a final position zone for a tray bearing said articles, said wall means having tray inlet and discharge openings opposite saidinitial and final position zones respectively, means in the chamber for sterilizing the articles on said tray, a door for closing the inlet opening, ratchet ,mechanism normally preventing movement of the door in opening direction, means for moving said tray in the chamber from said initial zone toward said final zone, and an element cooperating with said mechanism and tray-moving means and operable in response to movement of said tray beyond said initial position zone to release said mechanism whereby the door may be moved toward open position.

5. Acabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means defining a chamber .having an initial position zone and a final position zone for a tray bearing said articles, said wall means having trayv inlet and discharge openings opposite said initial and final position zones, respectively, means in the chamber for sterilizing the articles on said tray,

i a door for closing the inlet opening, ratchet mechanism normally preventing movement of the door toward open position, means for moving said tray in the chamber from said initial zone toward said final zone, a support for receiving and holding said tray in the chamber beyond said initial zone, and an element cooperating with said mechanism and tray-moving means and Y operable in response to movement of said tray on to saidsupport to release said mechanism whereby the door may be moved toward'open position. 6. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means defining a chamber having an initial position zone and a final position zone for a tray bearing said articles, said wall means .having tray inlet and discharge openings opposite said initial and final position zones respectively, means in the chamber for sterilizing the articles on said tray, a door for closing the inlet opening, mechanism normally preventing movement of the door toward open position, means for moving said tray in the chamber from said initial zone toward said final zone, a plurality of resilient clips proj ecting into the chamber for seating said tray beyond said initial zone, and an element cooperating with said mechanism and tray-moving means and operable in response to movement of said tray into seating engagement with said clips to release said mechanism whereby the door may be moved toward open position.

'7. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means forming a chamber having an inlet opening for said articles and an outlet opening through which i said articles may be withdrawn from the'chamber, means in the chamber for sterilizing said articles, means for moving the articles in the chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening toward the outlet opening, 'a door movably mounted between said openings, spring means biasingsaid door toward a position obstructing the outlet opening, ratchet means connected with the door whereby the door may be moved toward a position closing the inlet opening but may not normally be moved in an opposite direction, and means responsive to the named movement of articles in the chamber for releasing the ratchet means whereby the door may be moved in said opposite direction.

8. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising wall means forming achamber having an inlet opening for a tray bearing said articles and an outlet opening through which said tray may be withdrawn from the chamber, means in the chamber for sterilizing said articles, means for moving said tray in the chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening towards the outlet opening, a door movably mounted between said openings, spring means biasing said door toward a position obstructing the outlet opening, ratchet means connected with the door whereby the door may be moved toward a position closing the inlet opening but may not normally be moved in an opposite direction, and means responsive to actuation of the tray-moving means for releasing the ratchet means whereby the door may be moved in said opposite direction.

9. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having a substantially vertical chamber provided with a lower inlet opening for a tray bearing said articles and an. upper outlet. opening through which said traymay be withdrawn from the chamber, means in the chamber for sterilizing said articles, an elevator for raising said tray in the chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening toward the outlet opening, a door movably mounted between said openings, spring means biasing said door toward a position obstructing the outlet opening, a ratchet wheel rotatable when the door ismoved, a. pawl normally engaged with the ratchet wheel whereby the door may be moved toward a position closing the inlet opening but may not be moved in an opposite direction, and means cooperating with the pawl and with the elevator for releasing the pawl from the ratchet wheel whereby the door may be moved in said opposite direction when the elevator is operated to raise said tray.

10. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having wall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and having spaced apart openings through one of which said articles may be inserted into the chamber and through the other of which said articles may be withdrawn from the chamber, a rack within the chamber .for supporting said articles, means for moving said rack from a point opposite the insertion opening towards a point opposite the withdrawal opening, means for sterilizing the articles in the chamber, and means in the portion of the chamber opposite the withdrawal opening preventinginsertion of the rack into the chamber through sald opening when said portion, of the chamber is empty.

11. A .cabinetfor sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet havingwall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and havingspaced apart openings through oneof which said articles may be inserted into the chamber andthrough the other of which said articles may may bewithdrawn from the chamber, a rack for supporting said articles within the chamber, means for moving said rack from a point opposite the insertion opening towards a point opposite the withdrawal opening, means for sterilizing the articles in the chamber, and a clip yieldably projected into the chamber opposite the withdrawal opening having a shoulder face engageable with a rack to prevent insertion thereof into the chamber through said opening and having a cam face engageable with a rack in the chamber whereby the clip may be moved by said rack and the rack withdrawn from the chamber through said opening.

12. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having wall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and having spaced apart openings through one of which said articles may be inserted into the chamber and through the other of which said articles may be withdrawn from the chamber, a rack for supporting said articles within the chamber having vertical posts at its ends and a vertical post intermediate its ends, means for moving said rack from a point opposite the insertion opening towards a point opposite the withdrawal opening, means for sterilizing the articles in the chamber, and means projecting from said wall means into the chamber and engageable with the rack posts when opposite the withdrawal opening preventing insertion of the rack into the chamber through said opening.

13. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing arti cles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having wall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and having an inlet opening and an outlet opening spaced apart at opposite end portions of said path, a rack for supporting said articles within the chamber adapted to be inserted through the inlet opening and withdrawn through the outlet opening, means for moving said rack along the path, means for sterilizing articles on the rack while in the path, means within the chamber engageable with the rack preventing its withdrawal through the inlet opening, and means engageable with the rack preventing its insertion through the outlet opening.

14. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having therein a chamber provided with vertically superposed openings including an inlet opening for said articles and an outlet opening through which said articles may be Withdrawn from the chamber, means for moving said articles in the chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening toward the outlet opening, a source of sterilizing radiations within the chamber and beyond an end of the path through which said articles move, means energizing said source while the adjacent opening remains open, and a reflecting shield for said source cooperating with the source and the adjacent opening to reflect radiations from the source on to articles in the chamber and shade said opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through said opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside said opening is traversed by direct radiations.

15. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having a substantially vertical wall defining a chamber and provided with a lower inlet opening and an upper outlet opening through Which respective openings said articles may be supplied to and withdrawn from the chamber, means for moving said articles upwardly in the chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening toward a point opposite the outlet opening, a source of sterilizing radiations within the chamber and below the path through which the articles move,

means energizing said source while the lower opening remains open, and a reflecting shield par tially surrounding said source and cooperating therewith and with the inlet opening to reflect radiations from the source on to articles in the chamber and shade the inlet opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through said opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside said openingis traversed by direct radiations.

16. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having vertical wall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and said wall means having an inlet opening for said articles and an outlet opening through which said articles may be withdrawn from the chamber, each of said openings being in a vertical plane, means for supporting said articles within the chamber and moving them through said path from a point opposite the inlet opening toward a point opposite the outlet opening, sources of sterilizing radiations within the chamber and beyond the ends of said path,

,means energizing the source adjacent the inlet opening while said opening remains open, and a reflecting shield partially surrounding the source adjacent the inlet opening and cooperating with said source and opening to reflect radiations from said source on to the supporting means for the articles in the chamber and shade the inlet opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through said opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside said opening is traversed by direct radiations, said supporting means being substantially pervious to said radiations whereby the articles thereon are subjected to said radiations. 17. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having therein a chamber provided with an inlet opening for said articles and an outlet opening through which said articles may be withdrawn from the chamber, eachof said openings being in a vertical plane, means for moving said articles through a path in the chamber from a point opposite the inlet opening toward the outlet opening, a source of sterilizing radiations located in the chamber beyond said path and adjacent to the inlet opening, means energizing said source while the inlet opening remains open, and a reflecting shield partially surrounding said source and interposed between said source and opening whereby the opening is shaded while the portion of said path immediately opposite said opening is r;

traversed by direct radiations from said source.

18. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having wall means defining a chamber providing a substantially vertical path through which said articles may be moved and having spaced apart upper and lower openings through one of which said articles may be inserted into the chamber and through the other of which said articles may be withdrawn from the chamber, means for supporting said articles within the chamber and moving them through said path from a point opposite the inlet opening toward a point opposite the outlet opening, sources of sterilizing radiations Within the chamber and beyond the ends of said path, means energizing the source adjacent the lower opening while said opening remains open, and a reflecting shield partially surrounding the source adjacent the lower opening and coperating with said source and opening to reflect radiations from said source on to the supporting means for the articles in the chamber and shade said lower opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through said opening a d er y the zone of thechamber immediately inside said opening is traversed by direct radiations, said supporting means being substantially pervious to said radiations whereby radiations pass through said supporting means and impinge on articles in the path beyond said supporting means.

19. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having wall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and having spaced apart openings through one of which said articles may be inserted into the chamber and through the other ,of which said articles may be withdrawn from the chamber, a rack within the chamber for supporting said articles, means for moving said rack from apoint opposite the insertion opening towards a point opposite the withdrawal opening, means for in the portion of the chamber opposite the Withdrawal opening preventing insertion of the rack into the chamber through said opening when said portion of the chamber is empty, said last named means being movable to pass a rack from said portion of the chamber out through the withdrawal opening.

20. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware or the like comprising a cabinet having wall means defining a chamber providing a path through which said articles may be moved and having an inlet opening and an outlet opening spaced apart at opposite end portions of said path, a rack for supporting said articles withinthe chamber adapted to be inserted through the inletopening and withdrawn through the outletopening, means for moving the rack to prevent its withdrawal through the inletfopening.

21. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware and the like comprising a cabinet having therein a chamber provided with a vertical wall having an opening through which said articles may be passed between said chamber and the outside of the cabinet, a source of sterilizing rays for articles in the chamber comprising an electrically energized elongated bulb positioned within the chamber parallel with said wall and below the level of said opening, a circuit for energizing said bulb while said opening remains open, and shielding and reflecting means underlying said bulb and having a surface curved partially around the bulb on the side thereof fac ing the opening and terminating in a free edge so located with respect to said opening as to reflect radiations on to articles in the chamber and shade the opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through the opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside the opening is traversed by direct radiations which pass said free edge.

22. A cabinet for sterilizin and storing articles of tableware and the like comprising a cabinet having therein a chamber provided with a vertical wall having an opening through which said articles may be passed between said chamber and the outside of the cabinet, sources of sterilizing rays for articles in the chamber comprising a plurality f electrically energized elongated bulbs positioned within the chamber in spaced apart vertical planes parallel with said lying .a bulb and having a surface curved partially around said bulb on the side thereof facing the opening and each terminating in a free edge so located with respect to said opening as to reflect radiations on to articles in the chamber and shade the opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through the opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside the opening is traversed by direct radiations which pass said free edges.

23. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware and the like comprising a cabinet having therein a chamber provided with a vertical wall having an inlet opening through which said articles may be supplied to the chamber, sources of sterilizing rays for articles in the chamber comprising a pair of electrically energized elongated bulbs positioned within the chamber below the level of said opening and in spaced apart vertical planes parallel with said wall, a circuit for energizing said bulbs while said opening remains open, and shielding and reflecting means for said bulbs each underlying a bulb and having a surface curved partially around said bulb on the side thereof facing the opening and each terminating in a free edge so located with respect to said opening as to reflect radiations on to articles in the chamber and shade the opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through the op ning and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside the opening is traversed by direct radiations which pass said free edges.

24. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware and the like comprising a cabinet having therein a chamber provided with a vertical wall having an opening through which saidarticles may be passed between said chamber and the outside of the cabinet, a source of sterilizing rays for articles in the chamber comprising an electrically energized elongated bulb positioned within the chamber immediately inside said wall, parallel therewith, and below said opening, a circuit for energizing said bulb while said opening remains open, and shielding and reflecting means for said bulb underlying the bulb and having a surface curved partially around the bulb on the side thereof facing the opening and terminating in a free edge so located with respect to said opening as to reflect radiations on to articles in the chamber and shade the opening whereby substantially no radiations escape through the opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside the opening is traversed by direct radiations which pass said free edge.

25. A cabinet for sterilizing and storing articles of tableware and the like comprising a boxlike cabinet having therein a chamber provided with a vertical wall having an opening through which said articles may be passed between said chamber and the outside of the cabinet, sources of sterilizing rays for articles in the chamber comprising a plurality of electrically energized elongated bulbs positioned within the chamber adjacent a horizontal end wall thereof and below the level of the opening in spaced apart vertical planes parallel with the plane of said opening, a circuit for energizing said bulbs while said opening remains open, and a combined shield and reflector device for said bulbs comprising means disposed below the bulbs and between the same and said horizontal end wall of the chamber having surfaces curved partially around each bulb on the side thereof facing the opening and each terminating in a free edge so located with respect to said opening as to reflect radiations on to articles in the chamber and shade the opening and having also a surface inclined between the opposite edge of the curved surface adjacent the bulb which is nearer the opening and the free edge of the curved surface adjacent the next bulb, whereby substantially no radiations escape through the opening and whereby the zone of the chamber immediately inside the opening is traversed by direct radiations which pass said free edges.

MILTON SELI G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2565426 *Sep 14, 1950Aug 21, 1951Jr John W HayesSterilizing cabinet for liquid mixers
US4303819 *Apr 25, 1980Dec 1, 1981Dca Food Industries, Inc.Bottom entry oven
US4698206 *Sep 11, 1985Oct 6, 1987Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Co., Inc.Method for disinfecting dental impressions
US5459322 *Dec 14, 1993Oct 17, 1995Therakos, Inc.Ultraviolet light chamber
US8841632Jul 1, 2011Sep 23, 2014Practicon, Inc.Removable dental appliance sanitizer and storage device
US9662411 *Sep 11, 2015May 30, 2017Alan RizzoneMobile ultraviolet sterilization systems and methods
US20160074546 *Sep 11, 2015Mar 17, 2016Alan RizzoneMobile Ultraviolet Sterilization Systems and Methods
DE1032894B *Apr 19, 1952Jun 26, 1958Quarzlampen GmbhVorrichtung zum Entkeimen von Gegenstaenden
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/455.11, 422/24, 53/111.00R, D24/217
International ClassificationA61L2/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61L2/10
European ClassificationA61L2/10