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Publication numberUS2253652 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1941
Filing dateOct 24, 1940
Priority dateOct 24, 1940
Publication numberUS 2253652 A, US 2253652A, US-A-2253652, US2253652 A, US2253652A
InventorsRitter George
Original AssigneeRuberoid Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shingle
US 2253652 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 26, 1941.

G. RITTER SHINGLE Filed Oct. 24, 1940 lNvEl OR Qf'aef 577-52 ATTORNEY the une z zr mentar! portionor Patented Aug. 26,1941

George amor, Millington,

N. J., asslgnor to The Ruberoid Co., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey I Claims. This invention relates to shingles. and more particularly to shingles of the class known as asphalt shingles for use'in covering the roof and sides of a building.

Asphalt shingles are commonly composed of a base of roofing felt which is saturated and coated with bituminous vsaturating and coating compositions, and is faced with mineral granules embedded in the coating.

Whilel such shingles/are economical and eifective, they are subject to the disadvantage that when laid in overlapping courses the resultant covering has a. somewhat flat, monotonousappearance, lacking the desired depth of wooden or slate shingles.

It is an object of this invention to improve the appearance of the shingle by1applying or printing a rough texture, composed of discrete raised units Aor patches -of coating composition faced with mineral granules, upon the' portion of the granule facedsurface that is intended to be ex` posed when laid. l

It is a further object of the invention to increase the thickness of the exposed or butt portion of the shingle to -give the covering formed y ofthe shingles amore substantial appearance.

It isalso an'obiect of the invention to face the superimposed units or patches of coating, in certain regions or zones, with mineral granules of predominantly dark color soas vto produce simulatedv shadow effects.

-I am aware that variousproposals have heret'ofore been made to give the butts of asphalt shingles greater thickness and a more orna- V mental appearanca'for instance, by applying a secondlay r of coating` and granules, and indenting the in a pattern in simulation of the grairiof woodpr other texture. It hasalso been proposed to apply thetexture in the form of vertical overlay stripes.

I have found that byapplying the texture in substantially parallel, spaced apart longitudinal lines of elevated units or patches a'ribbed effect is secured which greatly enhances the ornamental appearance. t

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying draw-n ing, in which:

Figure 1 represents embodying the invention; g

Fig.' 2 represents a sectionalview thereof on a pe spective view of a fragrig. 3 represents an end of the shingle;

a face view ofv'a shingle m Appuoauoo ootober 24,1940, serial No.3sz, 5s3

(oidos-'1) Fig. 4 represents a fragmentaryplan view ofthe shingles as laid;

Fig. 5 represents a diagrammatic view of the apparatus for making the shingles; and

merely'for the purpose of illustration as the invention is applicable to shingles of a variety of different forms. The shingle is composed of a base I3 of felted fabric, such as'rooilng felt, saturated or impregnated with asphalt or other bituminous saturating composition. The base carries a-coating -Il of asphalt or other bituminous coating com-l position w-hich is applied over the entire face of the shingle, the application being preferablysomewhat thicker on the lower or butt portion than on the upper portion. Mineral granules i5 of any desired color or mixture of colors are applied to and embedded in the coating throughout its extent.

superimposed on and adhering to the granule faced surface of the lower portion of the shingle are a plurality of raised units or patches I6 of asphalt, or other bituminous coating cbmposition, faced'wlth mineral granules I1 of various mixtures of colors. These units are applied in substantially parallel linea extending lengthwise of the shingle, the lines being spaced apart widthwise of the, shingle, thus giving the surfacew/a rough, ribbed eifectcl The units I6 of each of several lines are preferably of irregular contour and irregularly spaced vfrom each other in accordance with a predetermined pattern,s`o that the lcumulative or combined leffect of all of the units provides an ornamental surface 'simulating the grain of a weathered wooden shingle or other desired pattern. In Fig. 3, for the sake .of-clearness, the granules I havebeen omitted Ifrom the spaces intervening the raised units I6.

In a certain` zone of the shingle the raised units or patches I8 are .preferably faced with mineral granules |18 of a predominantly darker I color than thegranules i1. The purpose of this is that when the shingles are laid in overlapping faced with dark granules to produce a shadow eifect. -For convenience of manufacture, more than one line of units or patches may be face( Fig. 6 represents a face view of a shingle.'em'

outs i2. This particular form has been selected coursesat least one lof the longitudinal lines `by relatively` narrow grooves.

units appears below the butts of the shingles when laid.

In the manufacture of the shingle, as shown diagrammatically in Fig. 5, the saturated sheet of roofing felt passes around a looper and cooler I9 into a receptacle 20' containing the molten coating composition and under a coating roll 2| that applies a layer of coating I4 over the entire upper surface of the sheet. It then passes between the rolls 22, 23 by which the excess coating is removed. The upper roll 22 is constructed to remove more c oating at certain areas across the width lof the sheet than at others so as to leave a band of greater thickness in that portion of the sheet which will constitute the lower portion kof the shingle when cut. A facing of granules I5 is deposited over the entire surface of the sheet from a suitable hopper 24, while the coating is still hot. The granules are embedded in the coating by a press-roll 25. The sheet may then be carried over a system of` rolls 26 to permit the coating to cool. Talc or the like may be applied .to the under surface of the sheetfrom a receptacle 21 to prevent the sheet from sticking to the rolls.-

'I'he sheet now passes overa printing or coating roll 28 which dips in a receptacle 29 containing molten coating material, and which prints or applies the coating in units or patches I6 on the granule faced coated surface of the sheet in lines running lengthwise of the sheet and in a predetermined pattern or design. 'I'he face of the roll 28 is suitably formed, to conin the direction of length of the shingle, instead of being disposed in substantially parallel lines in that direction. Y

While I have shown and described the invention applied to shingles of the kind commonly called strip-shingles,'it will be understood that it may also be applied to individual shingles, whether used for rooflngs or sidings.

What I claim isz 1. A shingle adaptedto be laid in overlapping courses lcomprising a felt base coated on its upper surface with bituminous coating composition faced with mineral granules, the lower portion of the shingle that is exposed when laid having superimposed on and adhering to its granule faced surface discrete units of granule faced coating disposed in spaced longitudinal .lines and arranged according to a predeterform to the desired ygrain or otexture, the relief portions that apply the unitsor patches being arranged in lines extending circumferentially l around the roll and separated from one another Suitable heated doctor blades' 30 may be provided to scrape the coating from the grooves or spaces between the printing portions of the roll. D

After passing around a roll 3 I, the sheet travels r granules I1, each deposit being preferably 'of a different color or blend. The excess of granules lis caught in the hopper 36 and maybe redeposited on the sheet. Since at this stage the units I6 of superimposed coating material are still hot, the granules deposited by these hoppers will adhere only to those ,units and vwill not mined' pattern.

` 2; A shingle adapted to be laid in overlapping courses comp-rising a felt base coated on its upper surface with bituminousA coating faced with mineral granules, the lower portion of the shingle that is exposed when laid having superimposedc on and adhering to its granule faced surface raised units of granule faced coating arranged hin lines extending in the direction of length of the shingle and spaced from one another both in the direction of length and of width of the shingle, said raised units combinedl forming a predetermined pattern.

3. A shingle of the character described comprising a felt base coated on its entire upper sur face with asphalt faced with mineral granules.

the lower .portion of the shingle that is exposed when laid having superimposed on and adhering thereto units of asphalt coating faced with mineral granules, said superimposed units being spaced substantially regularly from one another .widthwise of the shingle and being spaced iru wi-th asphalt faced with mineral granules, the

' under the hoppers 32, 33, '34 35 and. 36. These coating on the lower portion of the shingle that is exposed .when laid being thicker than on the upper portion, said lower portion having siperimposed thereon and adhering thereto units of asphalt coating faced with mineral granules, which units areus'paced substantially uniformly from-one another widthwise of the shingle and irregularly from one another lengthwise thereof in accordance with a predetermined pattern.

5. A shingle of the character described comprising a felt base coated on its upper surface with bituminous coating faced with mineral granules, the lower portion of the shingle that is exposed when laid 'having superimposed thereon and adhering thereto units of coating faced with mineral granules spaced apart from one another and arranged in lines extending lengthadhere to the rest of -the sheet. The granulestwv I1 and I8 are embedded in the coating units I6 A by the press-roll 31; The sheet may then be Y passed over the cooling rolls 38 and carried to a conventional shingle cutter (not shown) by same general construction as the shingle III previously described except that in this instance the superimposed units 4I)v of coating and granules are arranged in'somewhat staggered order,

wise of the shingle, the mineral granules on the units of a line immediately below the butt end of an overlapping shingle being of darker color than on the rest of th units.

l6. A shingle of the character described coinprising a felt base coated on its upper surface with bituminous coating faced with mineral non. The 'shingle esther@ uiustated is ofthe 70 granules, the lower portion of the shingle that is exposed when laid having superimposed thereon and adhering thereto units of coating faced' with mineral granules spaced. apart from one another and arranged in lines extending length"- that is to say, out'of alignment with one another `75 wise of the shingle, the mineral granules on the units in a. zone in theimmediateyicinity .oi' the v f 2,253,652 3 butt end of an overlapping shingle being of prec dominantly darker color than on the rest of the units.

7. A shingle of the character described comprising a felt base coated on its entire upper surface with` a continuous coating of bituminous composition faced with mineral granules, the coating being thicker on the lower portion of said surface than on its upper portion, said thicker lower portion having an ornamentation of patches of granule faced coating of irregular contour adherent to its surface and disposed thereon in substantially parallel relatively closeiy spaced lines extending in the general direction of the length of the shingle.

GEORGE RITTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3079729 *Apr 11, 1955Mar 5, 1963Building Products LtdShingles
US5347785 *Jun 15, 1992Sep 20, 1994Certainteed CorporationTwo element shingle
US5426902 *Jun 10, 1991Jun 27, 1995Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5488807 *Jun 10, 1994Feb 6, 1996Certainteed CorporationTwo element shingle
US5531831 *Dec 12, 1994Jul 2, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyStatic blending device
US5611186Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5624522 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 29, 1997Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology Inc.Method for applying granules to strip asphaltic roofing material to form variegated shingles
US5660014 *Feb 10, 1995Aug 26, 1997Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5746830 *Jul 17, 1996May 5, 1998Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Pneumatic granule blender for asphalt shingles
US5747105 *Apr 30, 1996May 5, 1998Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology Inc.Traversing nozzle for applying granules to an asphalt coated sheet
US5901517 *May 9, 1997May 11, 1999Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6190754Dec 24, 1997Feb 20, 2001Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaVariegated shingle and method of manufacture
US6195951Nov 17, 1998Mar 6, 2001Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6305138Oct 18, 2000Oct 23, 2001Certainteed Corp.Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6523316Oct 23, 2001Feb 25, 2003CertainteedComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US7805909Apr 9, 2009Oct 5, 2010Teng Yishien HShingle with low density granules and/or backdust
US20080086970 *Oct 17, 2006Apr 17, 2008Teng Yishien HShingles with low density granules and/or backdust
US20090249728 *Apr 9, 2009Oct 8, 2009Teng Yishien HShingle With Low Density Granules And/Or Backdust
US20110223370 *Sep 12, 2008Sep 15, 2011Selena Edustri Boya Kimya Sanayive Ticaret Limited SirketiInnovation in roofing material
USD369421Mar 17, 1995Apr 30, 1996Elk Corporation Of DallasRandom cut laminated shingle
EP0638695A1 *Oct 29, 1993Feb 15, 1995INDEX S.p.A. TECNOLOGIE IMPERMEABILIAn apparatus for making decorations on tarred membranes for surface covering of buildings
WO2010030253A1 *Sep 12, 2008Mar 18, 2010Selena Endustri Boya Kimya Sanayi Ve Ticaret Limited SirketiRoofing material with visual effect
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/208, D25/139, 52/557, 52/518
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D2001/005
European ClassificationE04D1/26