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Publication numberUS2254248 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 2, 1941
Filing dateApr 22, 1940
Priority dateApr 22, 1940
Publication numberUS 2254248 A, US 2254248A, US-A-2254248, US2254248 A, US2254248A
InventorsStirlen Eugene D
Original AssigneeSafety Fuel Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stove
US 2254248 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 2-, 1941. E. D. STIRLEN STOVE Filed April 22, 1940 solidified petroleum .rsrenraise az, tau 3 S -PA ENT zsuaiaf i STOVE I Stirlen, New'Ha'vemConm, alsignor, by 1 meme assignments, tov Safctnhel 1mm chm, C

onna a corporation of:

hpplieation April 22,1940, summertime" 9Claims.

One object of the'invention comprises inter alia a novel stove construction for the combustion of a solidifled fuel andpartic'ularly of a like. p

Another object of the invention comprises a The invention will be more clearly understood andstill further Jects thereof will appear from I the following de ription read in conjunction with the drawing, which:

Fig. 1 is a sectional side elevation of a stove in accordance with the invention;

This invention relates to new-and useful improvements in stoves.

fuel such as gasoline orthe novel stove construction of increased combustion-' efllciency.

' vbustion chamber ll substantially unobstructed. It is also of advantage to mount-the deflector Fig. 2 is a sectional view on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 lean eievational view partially insection of a fuel container package.

with reference tothe'drawing, the stove construction is preferably that of a detachable assemblyhaving ,a base .stand ll, an annular fuel container Ii with an open top at i2, and). top

unit including a series of flue members substantially coaxially alignedand superimposed on the fuel receptacle.

The annular top edges Ii preferably engage and support an ;outer flanged annular base disc member If and an' inner flanged disc member ll, sothat these parts engage in fitting relation and be retained substantially as one unit. Flanged discs l3 and M are held in position by suitable means, such as strut bars II, to thereby provide for the free passage of the upward flow offuel vapors. 7

.Three substantially coaxially aligned upright tubular burner flue members I, i1, and I8, mounted on the disc members If andi4, respectively, form inner, intermediate, and outer chem bers l8. l7, and I8. The-flue members are preferably progressively higher from the inner to the outer one. Tubular burner flue members I1 and it are provided with a multiple number of air holes I! and preferably with between fourteen and sixteen holes to-the square inch, each holegbelng of approximately one-sixteenth inch diameter. Theburner flue member it is preferably provided with air holes, such as the perforations 2G. The chamber l8 constitutes substantially an air flue while .the chamber I 8' is essentially. a combustion chamber. Suitable air deflector means, such as the inverted cone of the fuel receptacle (c1. res-4s) a II and chamber II. It is essential to the successful operation of the device that the deflector means. are spaced a substantial distance away from the top edge of the inner b r er flue memher I. so as to provide an air pa a e over and past this edge, as for instance by means of the spacer bars or the like 22 supporting the deflector II in spaced relation abovethe burner u flue members II and i1. [For best results it is preferable to have the deflector 2i of substantially the same diameter as that of the intermediate flue member I] so as to leave the comcone-in such manner that its spacing from the top edgeof the intermediate burner-flue member l7.

of air into the combustion chamber l8 through the air holes l8, together with the air deflected across the top of the burner by the deflector 2t,

1 causes an efliclent combustion of the fuel vapors and the substantial elimination of smoke and The base disc I! maybe provided with a convenient handle; such as the handle 24, so that the top portion of the stove construction may be conveniently lifted oil the fuel container II when it is desired to ignite the vapors and start the stove in operation. When it isdesired to extinguish the flame, the top part may be lifted off and a suitable cover may be placed on the fuel container, thereby smothering the flame.

deflector plate iii, are mounted in the upper part of the burner assembly so as to overlie the flue In the preferred embodiment of my invention, the fuel receptacle ii holding the fuel cake 28 i is selected in the form of an annular ring having an air passage. as for instance the circular, central air passage. 26, positioned and adapted to serve as an extension of the flue i6 and the unrestricted admission of air thereto.

It will be noted that the fuel receptacle forming part of the stove construction constitutes an easily removable unit, and I prefer to put up the solidified fuel cake in a package which after removal of-the cover, such as cover as illustrated in Fig. 3, can be fitted to the upper part ofthe -stove construction and used as the fuel receptacle without the necessity of removing the fuel from the package. Buch arrangement has the further advantage that it permits the discarding of the old containersafter the fuel is used up and the substitution of a new container, thus avoiding any trouble and difllculty of cleaning parts or disposing of carbonaceous or tarry resi-' dues.

The foregoing speciflc description is for purposes of illustration and not of.limitation, and it is therefore my intention that the invention be limited only by the appended claims or their equivalents, wherein I have endeavored to claim broadly all inherent novelty.

I claim: a

1. In a stove construction for burning solidified fuel the improvement comprising three substantially coaxially aligned upright tubular burner flue members, the outer and intermediate burner flue members having in'their walls a multiple number of air holes and defining a'combustion chamber, the inner burner flue member defining an inner air flue and with said intermediate burner flue'member an intermediate chamber, means'for admitting to said combustion chamber fuel vapors emanating from a vaporizing solidifled fuel means for admitting a restricted flow of air to said intermediate chamber adjacent the bottom thereof, and air deflector means overlying the inner air flue and inner burner flue member, said intermediate chamber being substantially open and unobstructed at the end facing said deflector means and said deflector means being positioned to deflect air rising through said inner -air flue and being spaced a substantial distance from the top'edges of the inner and intermediate burner flue.

2. In a stove construction for burning solidified.

fuel the improvement comprising three substan-' tially coaxially aligned upright tubular burner flue members, the outer and intermediate burner flue members having in their walls a multiple number of air holes and defining a combustion chamber designed and adapted to be placed in ,communication with a fuel receptacle for solidifled fuel, the inner burner flue member defining an inner air flue and with and intermediate members'to provide an air passage over and past said top edges. a

3. In a stove construction for burning solidified v fuel the improvement in accordance with claim 2, in which said intermediate burner flue member is higher than said inner burner flue member and in which the spacing of said cone from the top edge of the inner burner flue member is greater than the spacing of said cone from the top edge of the intermediate burner flue member.

4. In a stove construction for burning solidified fuel the improvement comprising three substantially coaxially aligned upright tubular burner flue members. the outer and intermediate burner flue members having in their walls a multiple number of air holes and defining a. combustion chamber designed and adapted to be placed in communication with a fuel receptacle for solidifled fuel, the inner burner flue member having adjacent its bottom portion a multiple number of perforations, said inner burner flue member deflning an inner air flue and with said intermediate burner flue member an intermediate cham: ber, and an inverted air deflector cone overlying the inner air flue and inner burner flue member and extending to above the intermediate burner flue member, said intermediate chamber being from the top edge of the-intermediate burnerflue member.

5. In a stove construction for burning solidifled fuel the improvement comprising three substantially coaxially aligned upright tubular flue members, the outer and intermediate burner flue members having in their walls a multiple number of air holes, and defining a combustion chamber designed and adapted to be placed in communication with a fuel receptacle for solidified fuel, which receptacle has aninner flue extension, the inner burner fiue member having adjacent its bottom portion a multiple number of perforations, said inner burner flue member deflning an 'inner air flue and with said intermediate burner flue member an intermediate chamber having a substantially closed bottom, said inner air flue being positioned and adapted to be brought into registry with said flue extension of said receptacle, said intermediate burner flue. member being higher than said inner burner flue member, and an inverted air deflector cone overlying the inner air flue and inner burner flue member and extending'to above the intermediate burner flue member said intermediate chamber being substantially open and unobstructed at the end facing said deflector cone and said deflector cone Y being positioned to deflect air rising through said inner-air flue and'being spaced a substantial distance from the top edges of the inner and intermediate burner flue members to provide an air passage over and past said top edges, the spacing of said cone from the top edge of the inner burner flue member being greater than the spacing of said cone from the top edge of the intermediate burner flue member.

6. In a stove construction for burning solidifled fuel the improvement in accordance with claim 5, in which said outer burner flue member is higher than said, intermediate burner flue member.

7. In a stove construction for burning solidifled fuel the improvement in accordance with claim 5, in which at least some of the air holes in said inner burner flue member are of larger diameter than said air holes in said intermediate 8. In astove construction for burning solidifled fuel the improvement in accordance with claim 7, in which at least some of the air holes in said inner burner flue member are of larger diameter than the air holes in said intermediate and outer burner flue members and in which said outer burner flue member is higher than said intermediate burner flue member.

9; In a stove construction for-burning solidifled fuel the improvement comprising three substantially coaxially aligned upright tubular flue members, the outer and intermediate burner flue members having in their walls a multiple num- I ber of air holes, there being to the square inch substantially from 14 to 16 such air holes of approximately diameter each, the outer and in,-

ner burner fluemembers defining a combustion chamber designed and adapted to be placed in communication with a fuel receptacle for solidifled fuel, which receptacle has an inner flue extension, the inner bumer flue member having adsaid intermediate burner flue member an intermediate-chamber having a substantiallyclosed.

' bottom, said inner air flue being positioned and jacent its bottom portion a multiple number'of perforations at least some 01 which areof larger diameter than said air holes in said intermediate and outer burner flue members, said inner burner flue member defining an inner air flue and with substantial distance from the top edges of the inner and intermediate burner flue members to provide an air passage over and past said top edges, the spacing of said cone from the top edge of the inner burner flue member being greater than the spacing of said cone from the top edge or the intermediate burner flue member.

UGENE n.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2482797 *May 9, 1944Sep 27, 1949Carlisle BarracksPressureless gasoline stove
US2877759 *Mar 17, 1955Mar 17, 1959Giese Albert JPortable stove
US4279589 *Jun 12, 1978Jul 21, 1981Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Combustion device for liquid fuels
US5022352 *May 31, 1990Jun 11, 1991Mor-Flo Industries, Inc.Burner for forced draft controlled mixture heating system using a closed combustion chamber
US5240411 *Feb 10, 1992Aug 31, 1993Mor-Flo Industries, Inc.Atmospheric gas burner assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/43, 431/195, 239/559
International ClassificationF24C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24C9/00
European ClassificationF24C9/00