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Publication numberUS2254685 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 2, 1941
Filing dateNov 9, 1939
Priority dateNov 9, 1939
Publication numberUS 2254685 A, US 2254685A, US-A-2254685, US2254685 A, US2254685A
InventorsJackson Walter C
Original AssigneeTingiey Reliance Rubber Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rubber overshoe
US 2254685 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 2, 1941. w. c. JACKSON RUBBER OVERSHOE Filed NOV. 9, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. /4 d//e/' C JJc/flsori.

1 W W W ATTORNEYSTM Sept. 2, 1941. w, c JACKSON 2,254,685

RUBBER OVERSHOE Filed NOV. 9, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR. M/a/fer C. dad/s00. BY

' ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 194.1

RUBBER OVERSHOE Walter C. Jackson, a

'- way, N. J., usignor te 'lingiey Reliance Ru b'er Corporatlen, a corpsration of New Jersey Application November 9, 1939, SerialNo. 303,575

' 7 Claims.

This invention relates to rubber overshoes commonly known as "rubbers," comprising a full sole having toe, shank and heel portions and an upperhaving toe, side and counter portions. Ordinarily, these overshoes are made of rubberized fabric or rubber reinforced by a fabric lining and, hence, are relatively inelastic, the fabric embedded in or associated with the rubber body limiting the stretchability of the overshoe, so that the latter is intended to fit a shoe of one definite size only. However, it has been proposed to make an overshoe entirely of rubber, or at least with an all-rubber upper, so as to enable an overshoe of one size to be stretched both lengthwise and side-wise to fit'difierent sizes of inner shoes. This form of ail-rubber overshoe has not proved to be completely satisfactory, for the reason that when the overshoe is stretched over the inner shoe, as it must be to be held in place, the side edges of the overshoe stretch in a straight line between the extreme lateral points of the toe and counter of the inner shoe, leaving an opening between the side walls or the overshoe and the sides of the inner shoe in the region of the shanks or arches. On the other hand, if the overshoe is of such size that the upper is not stretched enough to pull the sides thereof away from the inner shoe, the sides buckle outwardly as the weight is shifted from the heel to the toe in walking. The result in each instance is that the presence of the openings provides access to the interior of the overshoe and, hence, the overshoe fails to perform its intended function.

The object of the present invention is to overcome the foregoing. and other objectionable features and provide a full-soled vulcanized, allrubber elastic overshoe, or a full-soled overshoe withan elastic upper, formed so that the upper will maintain an intimate contact with the inner shoe at all times. To this end, and in its broader aspects, the invention contemplates the provision of tension means to hold the upper of the overshoe in engagement with the sides of the inner shoe at all times. More specifically, the tension means comprise thickened strip-like areas extending from opposite sides of the shank portion of the sole up along the sides and around the top edgesoi the toe and counter portions of the upper, the thickened areas being adapted to exert a greater tension in those regions oi the upper when the overshoe is applied. The toe, shank and heel portions of the sole oi the over: shoe are of uniform thickness, except that the sides to form an anchorage for the ends of the tension strips. The ends of the tension strips are anchored in the thickened sides or the shank portion of the sole in overlapping relation and in that relationship, extend up along the sides of the upper to a point short of the top edge thereof. At that point, the tension strips diverge and extend to the top edge of-the upper, one of the tension strips running forwardly around the toe portion of the upper and the other rearwardly around the counter. A thickened strip-like area extends vertically throughout the full height of the counter at its rearmost portion, and serves to keep the counter from curling when the overshoe is applied to and removed from the inner shoe. Other portions ofthe upper are also thickened to give body, shape and wearing qualities to the upper, as will be pointed out in the detailed description to follow.

In the accompanying drawings, the invention has been shown merely by way of example and in preferred form, and obviously many variations and modifications may be made therein which will still be comprised within itsspirit. It is to be understood, therefore, that the in vention is not limited to any specific form or embodiment, except insofar as such limitations are specified in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of an overshoe em bodying the present invention Fig. 2 is a side elevation, looking toward the lower side of the overshoe as shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation, looking toward the top side of the overshoe as shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a ,vertical section taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 5 is a transverse section taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section taken on the line 8-0 0! Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a vertical section taken on the line 1-1 of Fig. 1, looking inthe direction of thearrows; I

Fig. 8 is a top plan view of a modification oi the overshoe shown in Figs. 1 to 7;

Fig. 9 is a side elevation, looking toward the lower side or the overshoe as shown in Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a side elevation, looking toward the top side or the overshoe as shown in Fig. 8;

shank portion is thickened along its opposite -Fig. 11 is a vertical section taken on the line II-I'I of Fig. 8, looking in the direction of the Fig. 14 is a longitudinal section taken on the line I 4-I 4 of Fig. looking in the direc ion of the arrows.

Referring to the embodiment of the inventionshown in Figs. 1 to '7, the overshoe I comprises a full sole 2 having toe, shank and heel portions 3, 4 and 5, respectively, and an upper 6 comprising a toe portion I and a counter 8 connected by intermediate side portions 9 and III. A head II extends continuously around the top margin of the upper 6 and serves to prevent the upper from tearing when it is stretched.

, The upper 6 of the overshoe I is provided with tension strips I2 and I3, formed by thickened portions of the upper 6 which extend from the opposite sides of the shank portion 4 up the sides 9 and ll) of the upper 6 and then diverge, the tension strip l2 running around the top edge of toe portion 1 and the tension strip I2 running around the top edge of the counter 8. The shank portion 4 is thickened at its-opposite sides, as at I4 (Fig. 7), and these thickened areas serve as anchorages for the opposite ends of the tension strips I2 and I3. The ends of the tension strips I2 and I3 are anchored in the thickened sides I4 of the shank portion 4 in I overlapping relation, the end of the tension strip I3 overlying the end of the tension strip I2, and the tension strips extend up along the opposite sides 9 and I0 of the upper 6 in their overlapping relationship, gradually diverging in fore and aft directions until they separate completely, as at I5, below the top margin of the upper 6. The tension strips I2 and I3 are not of uniform thickness, being tapered throughout from their upper edges I1, where they are thickest, to their lower edges 18.

The sides 9 and III of the upper 6 extend above the points of divergence II of the tension strips I2 and I3 and providein those regions V-shaped sections I6 which are thinner than the tension strips, being substantially the same thickness as the body of the upper I. At its rearmost portion, the counter l is formed with a thickened strip 19 extending vertically throughout the height .of the counter and tapering from top to bottom, being thickest at the top. The strip II serves to prevent the counter 6 from curling when the, overshoe I is applied to and removed from the inner shoe.

When the overshoe I is applied to an inner shoe, the sole 2 and upper 6 are both stretched to fit the inner shoe, and in their stretched condition conform snugly to the shape of the inner shoe. The tension strips I2 and II, being thicker than the remainder of the upper 6, are placed under a greater tension and, for this reason, hug the sides of the inner shoe instead of being stretched out straight between the extreme lateral points. for example, the points x and Y (Fig. 1), of the toe portion .1 and counter 8, respectively, and cause. the sides 0 and It or the upper 6 to be held in intimate contact with sides of the inner shoe. The thickened portions I4 of the shank portion 4 offer greater resistance to stretchability than the remaining portions of the sole 2 and, of course, the more the thickened portions I4 are stretched and under tension, the more resistant they become to the pull of the tension strips l2 and I2. Although the tension strips I2 and I3 are anchored in the thickened portions I4 of the shank portions 4 in overlapping relation, nevertheless they act independently, and, being tapered from top to bottom, the tension increases throughout their widths from bottom to top. This has the effect of forcing them inward against the sides of the inner shoe along the line of increase in tension, insuring a snug fit with the sides of the inner shoe throughout their widths. The V-shaped sections I6 of the sides 8 and III, which extend above the points of divergence I5 of the tension strips I2 and I3, are also held by the tension strips in engagement with the sides of the inner shoe. It is pointed out that the V-shaped sections I6 could be omitted if their presence were not desired to provide continuous side portions 9 and III of full height. However, it is important, when the V-shaped sections I8 are present, that they be thinner than, the tension strips I2 and I2, because they cover those portions of the inner shoe which is frequently caused to bulge because of the presence oi prominent bones in the arch of the foot. If the V-shaped sections I6 were not thinner than the tension strips I2 and I2, the sides of the overshoe in those regions would fail to conform to the ,bulge of the inner shoe and would leave openings on both sides of the bulge, but being thinner than the tension strips I2 and I2, the V-shaped sections I6 stretch to conform to the shape of the bulge on the inner shoe and allow the contiguous portions of the tension strips to fit in snugly against the sides of the inner shoe. The thickened vertical strip I9 at the back of the counter 8 holds the counter at its full height when the overshoe I is applied to the inner shoe, since without the strip I! the top of the counter would have at tendency to curl inwardly.

In the modification shown in Figs. 8 to 14,. the overshoe 2| embodies all of the elements described in connection: with the overshoe I shown in Figs. 1 to 7. However, the overshoe 2| includes additional features which render it more'rugged and give it a stylish, neat app ance.

The full sole 2 of the overshoe 20 is of uniform Mon 4. The tension strips I2 and II, as before,

have their opposite ends anchored in the thickened sides I4 of the shank portion 4 in over lapping relation and extend up along the sides 2 and II, diverging at II and the strip I2 going around the toe portion I of the upper and the strip I2 going around the counter l. The toe portion I of the upper I is "capped," that is, it is formed thicker at its front 2I than at the opposite sides 22, yet not as thick as the portion 22 of the tension strip I2 which extends around the top edge of the toeportion 1 of the upper. The base of the toe portion 1 of the upper 6 is formed with a marginal portion 24, approximately the same height as the welt or an inner shoe, which is even thicker than the capped front 2| and extends entirely around the toe portion I of the upper 6 from one side of the shank portion 4 to the opposite side thereof. The capped front 2i of the toe portion 1 and the marginalstrip 24 not only add a neat appearing design to the toe portion I of the overshoe 2B, but they provide a greater thickness of material in those regions to withstand scumn'g" and other wear to which the toe portion of the overshoe may be subjected.

The counter 8 is formed at its base. between the opposite sides of the shank portion 6 and the vertical strip it at the rear of the counter, with thickened side portions 25, rising from the heel throughout approximately one-half the height of the counter B and tapering so that they are thinnest at the top. The thickened counter portions 25 provide for greater wear in those regions of the counter, provide the counter 8 with an attractive design, and also aid. the

vertical strip E9 in preventing the counter 8 from curling when the overshoe is applied to and removed'irom the innershoe.

The overshoes land Eli are formed of vulcanized, elastic rubber, which adapts them to stretch so that one size of overshoe will fit several different sizes ofinner shoes. Thus, three sizes of overshoes, designated as small, medium and large, for example, are all that are necessary to fit inner shoes ranging from size 6. having a.

broad toe, to size 11 having a pointed toe. The "small overshoe is stretchable to adapt it to fit inner shoes ranging from size 6, having a broad toe, to size8 having apointed toe; the medium" overshoe is adapted to fit inner shoes ranging from size 8, havinga broad toe, to size 10 having a pointed toe; and the large overshoe is adapted to fit inner shoes ranging from size 10, having a broad toe, to size 11 having a pointed toe. Of course, it will be understood that the size ranges given are approximate, since variations in the over-all dimensions of inner shoes will be found as between shoes of diiierent lasts. It is pointed out, too, that the overshoes l and Zll are made preferably of good rubber stock see 3 and adapted to be stretched when the overshoe is applied, and elastic tension means anchored to the shank portion of the sole and extending therefrom up, and secured to, the side portions of the upper and along the top edges thereof and around the counter, as well as up, and secured 2,. A low cut all-rubber elastic overshoe com prising a sole having toe, shank and heel portions, an upper having toe, side and counter portions, the sole and upper each being stretchable lengthwise and sidewise, and elastic tension strips anchored to the opposite sides of the shank por- I tions and extending therefrom up the side por tions of the upper substantially to the top edges thereof, and diverging to extend one rearwardly around the top edge of the counter and one forwardly around the top edge of the toe, said elastic tension strips being adapted to stretch when the overshoe'is applied but causing the overshoe to other greater resistance to stretch in the localized regions of the tension strips.

3. A low cut all-rubber elastic overshoe adapted.

to be stretched as a whole when applied to the shoe and comprising a-sole having toe, shank and 1 heel portions, an upper having toe, side and counter portions, said upper being thickened around the top edges of'the toe, counter and sideportions and down the side portions to the shank portion of the sole to provide localized strip poi:-

tions adapted to increasethe tensionin those I regions when the overshoe is applied to the shoe.

4. An overshoe according to claim 3, wherein the shank portion thereof is thickened alonglts opposite sides to reduce the stretchability or the sole there'at and to provide anchorage for the tension strips.

As already stated, the invention has been shown Q merely by way'of example and in preferred form,

and obviously many variations and modifications can be made therein which will still be comprised within its spirit. For example, it is proposed to embody the invention in molded, vulcanized rubbe: overshoes, but obviously the overshoes could be preformed and vulcanized, or made by any other suitable method. Furthermore, the lawn-- tion is equally applicable to elastic rubber overshoes or different forms or styles, such, for example, as so-called storm rubbers which have a flap or tongue extending from the vamp or the toe portion up over the instep. Many othervariations and modifications will occur to those skilled in the art and need not be set forth at this time.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim 1. A low cut overshoe comprising a. sole having toe, shank and heel portions, a continuous elastic upper having toe. side and counter portions,

5. An all-rubber elastic overshoe according to claim 8, wherein the thickened strip portions of the upper diverge at a point above the shank portion or the sole, leaving thinner, side portions above them at the point of divergence.

6. An ell-rubber elastic overshoe according to claim 8, wherein the thickened strip portions at the top edges of the upper taper in cross section being thickest at the top.

7. A lowcut all-rubber elastic overshoe adapted to be stretched as a whole when applied to the shoe and comprising a sole having toe, shank and heel portions and an upper having toe, side and counter portions, said upper being thickened from the shank portion or the sole up the side portions or the upper above said shank portion and from the thickened side portions along the top of the upper rearwardly'ln the direction of the counter WALTER'C'. JACKSON. 1

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2617209 *Aug 26, 1949Nov 11, 1952Tingley Reliance Rubber CorpRubber overshoe
US2627676 *Dec 10, 1949Feb 10, 1953Hack Shoe CompanyCorrugated sole and heel tread for shoes
US2652637 *Oct 12, 1951Sep 22, 1953Hardman Rena BellOne-piece foldable overshoe
US2657477 *Mar 18, 1952Nov 3, 1953Elmo Winslow ArthurFoot and/or footwear protector
US2860425 *Jun 17, 1955Nov 18, 1958Tingley Rubber CorpRubber overshoe
US3008190 *Aug 16, 1955Nov 14, 1961Robert H MesingerMethod and apparatus for forming cycle saddle covers
US3077363 *Jan 22, 1957Feb 12, 1963Mesinger Robert HCycle saddle covers
US3724107 *Nov 8, 1971Apr 3, 1973Goodrich Co B FElastic overshoes
US4292746 *Apr 25, 1979Oct 6, 1981Delaney Glen JLight weight insulated athletic shoe
US5396717 *Apr 12, 1994Mar 14, 1995Bell; MichaelConvertible overshoe with tear resistant bead
US6076284 *Nov 6, 1995Jun 20, 2000Ballet Makers, Inc.Shoe with split sole and mid-section reinforcement
US20130160330 *Oct 25, 2012Jun 27, 2013Robert W. WOJNOWSKIRentable bowling overshoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/7.3, 36/58.5
International ClassificationA43B3/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/16
European ClassificationA43B3/16