Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2255036 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1941
Filing dateAug 15, 1939
Priority dateAug 15, 1939
Publication numberUS 2255036 A, US 2255036A, US-A-2255036, US2255036 A, US2255036A
InventorsGedge Charles F
Original AssigneeBuckeye Incubator Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Incubator tray
US 2255036 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 9, 1941.

c. F. GEDGE 2,255,035

INCUBATOR TRAY Filed Aug. l5, 1939A 4 Sheets-Sheet l l I E I l l l I Digi/53mm@ F GEDGE c AY ncuAToR TR 959 1 led Aug' 15" F1 l' lll lill." llllll Il," ll'l'llll l l 'Il' 'lll' 2 et 4 Sheets-She 5 El mijn Dljmmljm DDU UEE El EEE'UDED El DE l DDDDDE DE l DDD DDE EEE DI] ESEESDDUD DE D DE] @#D DUDE /9 C] [mi {jl} DEJDEE EDU555@ mig/@3 IEQl.

Sept 9, 1941- c. F. GEDGE 2,255,036

INGUBATOR TRAY Filed Aug. 15, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 n' nnnnmnnnn nnnnnnnnn UUDUCIDDDD INEE.

Jrwoweoi. CHAR LES EGEDGE.

DDDUDCIDUCI DDUCIDCICIDD Sept 9, 1941 c. F. GEDGE 2,255,036

y INCUBATOR TRAY Filed Aug. l5, 1939 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I III III III III III IIIIII III IIID III 7` 3 I8 35 37 3@ EVC/#ARLES H6552? dv, e QU n l CMd/neqs Patented Sept. 9,- 1941 UNITED STATES INCUBATR TRAY Application August 15, 1939, Serial No. 290,271

s claims. `(011.119-43) This invention relates to an improved incubator tray and in particular to improved setting and hatching incubator trays and to an improved method of transferring eggs from a setting tray to a hatching tray. The principal object of this invention is to devise a setting tray which is adapted to facilitate the transfer of eggs therefrom to a hatching tray.

Another object is to devise an improved hatching tray which is adapted to receive eggs from the improved setting tray and to cooperate with said setting tray during the transfer of eggs.

Another object is to provide an incubator tray which provides better circulation of air therethrough thereby improving the hatching percentage,

Another object is to provide hatching and setting trays of sheet metal having perforated side walls for improved transverse air circulaf tion. In a preferred embodiment the perforations are so disposed that maximum air circulation, coupled with adequate rigidity, is brought about.

Another object is to provide a hatching tray of Y ing tray and the baffle plate therebelow and subsequently passing upwardly through the perforated hatching tray bottom into the hatching tray interior.

In a preferred form this improved l to then rotate the combined hatching and setting full length perforated runner is integral with the side walls of the hatching tray. The purpose of having the full length runner is to avoid injury to the toes of chickens projecting through the perforated hatching tray bottom during removal of hatching tray from the hatching tray rack or during subsequent sliding of the hatching tray relative to any surface or ledge upon which it may be slid.

Another object is to devise an improved method for transferring eggs from a setting tray into a hatching tray. In accordance with previous practice it has been customary to place the setting tray full of eggs upon any suitable surface,

Vtrays until the hatching tray is right side up. The

setting tray wouldA then be removed upwardly leaving the eggs distributed on the surface of the larger hatching tray. This method of transfer is difficult for the uninitiated to perform and involves the 'danger'of injury to the eggs.

Still other objects will more fully hereinafter appear.

Referring to the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective of a setting tray which embodies the principles of the present invention.

' Figure 2 is a top plan view of the setting tray of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a rear end elevation of the setting tray of Figure 1 with the left hand portion in section.

Figure 4 is a perspective of a hatching tray em bodying the principles of the present invention.

Figure 5 is a top plan view thereof.

Figure 6 is a rear end elevation partly in section thereof.

Figure 7 is a longitudinal sectional View showing the setting and hatching trays in cooperative relation during theY transfer of the eggs from the setting tray to the hatching tray.

Figure 8 is a perspective sectional view showing a modified form of hatching tray 'having an improved runner construction.

Figure 9 is a partial end elevatienf partly in section, of a hatching rack with the hatching tray of Figures 4 to 7 tiered therein.

Figure 10 is a similar View showing the modified hatching tray of Figure 8 arranged in tiersrin a hatching rack.

Figure 11 is a longitudinal detailed section of a portion of a hatching rack with the hatching tray of Figures 4 to 7 therein and showing the turning upwardly of the outward end of the horizontal tray support so as to prevent the tray from sliding outwardly due to slight jars.

' Figure 12 is a section through the side wall of ya modified form of setting tray showing the formation of the intermediate bottom-retaining rim out of the side wall; this'rim forms a guideway for the sliding bottom. v

Figure 13 is a perspective elevational view of a hatching tray showing the runners integral with the side walls thereof.

Figure 14 is a plan view of the hatching tray of Figure 13.

VFigure 15 is a rear elevational view ofthe hatching'tray of Figure 14 but with a portion of the wall broken away to show a portion of the to then invert the hatching tray thereover and 55 tray in cross-section.v

Figure 16 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the hatching tray of Figure 13 shown in combination with a setting tray.

In the incubating of eggs it is customary to carry out the setting and the hatching in separate incubators, the eggs being allowed to remain in the setting trays in the setting incubator for eighteen days and then being transferred to hatching trays which are placed in a hatching incubator for the remaining three day period in which hatching occurs. In one aspect the present invention is particularly directed toward facilitating the transfer of the eggs from the setting to the hatching trays. The eggs are customarily packed vertically into the setting tray without opportunity for freedom of movement therein, and the hatching tray is m-ade substantially larger so that when the eggs are transferred from the setting tray to the hatching tray they have sufficient room to lie flat and to allow the hatched chick a substantial amount of room. It has been customary to employ no baffles between the superimposed setting trays, and to pass the air vertically through tiers of setting trays, employing setting trays which have wire screen bottoms so as to allow the air to circulate vertically through adjacent setting trays. In the hatcher the trays are disposed a substantial distance apart from one another and impervious baffles are employed between vertically adjacent A hatching trays to prevent the transfer of down, dust, etc., from one tray of hatching chicks downwardly into the next lower hatching tray, thereby adding to the sanitary condition of the hatching incubator and insuring the production of more healthy chicks. Accordingly it was impossible to circulate the air vertically through the tiers of hatching trays and reliance was hitherto placed upon the spacing of the trays apart from one another to provide circulation of air horizontally to the hatching eggs.

In -accordance with the present invention the transfer from the setting to the hatching trays is considerably facilitated and at the same time trays are made available which are of greater strength and durability and which provide `substantially improved air circulation to the setting and hatching eggs by means of perforations in the side walls of the trays.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and rst to Figures 1 to 3, wherein a setting tray is portrayed, reference numeral I designates generally the setting tray having side walls 2 and having end walls 3 and 4. The tray, as shown, is made of sheet metal of substantial gauge and the various parts thereof are joined together in any suitable manner as by spot welding. The side and l end walls are continued inwardly at their bottom to form a rim 5 which cooperates with an angle iron 6 to form a recess 'I for receiving the removable bottom 8. Bottom 8 is slidable outwardly from its normal position through a slot 9 provided in the end wall 4 adjacent its bottom. In Figure 1 bottom 8 is shown partially slid outwardly to illustrate this construction. The bottom 8 is of sheet steel or sheet iron of substantial gauge and is perforated throughout substantially its entire exposed area with square perforations I8 which are closely adjacent to one another.

The perforating is carried out in such manner that substantially maximum strength is retained while at the same time providing substantially maximum air 'circulation through bottom V8.

The side and end walls of setting tray I are provided with a plurality` of rows of similar perforations II which allow circulation of air transversely of the setting tray. End wall 3 is provided centrally with a label holder I2 which also acts as a pull for removing the setting tray from the setting tray rack. While the construction shown illustrates the slot 9 as being on the rear end of the setting tray, it will be apparent that if desired it may be placed on the front or forward end 3, although the latter construction is not as desirable as the construction shown because the pull I2 would require that the bottom 8 be slid outwardly too far before placing the setting tray in the hatching tray.

The bottom 8 of setting tray I is reinforced and supported at its edges by an inwardly turned lower rim I3 which extends around its periphery. Rim I3 further acts as a sliding runner during insertion or removal of bottom S. Angle iron 6 yadds greatly to the strength of the setting tray because it is spot welded thereto and because it is of more substantial gauge than the setting tray walls. As is seen in Figure 3, the upper edge of this angle iron 6 terminates just below the lowermost row of holes II in the side and end walls of the setting tray. Referring now to Figures 4 to 6 in particular, there is illustrated'one form of hatching tray embodying the principles of the present invention. This tray is designated generally as I4 and has side walls I5 of vsheet metal and end walls IIS and I'I. The yside'anrl end walls are provided -with three rows of perforations I8 which `are similar to those'described in connection with the setting tray I. The side and end walls are also provided with an inwardly extending integral rim I8 at their bottom which serves to support the upwardly removable ltray bottom 28. Bottom 20 is perforated with perforations 2-5 over substantially its entire area in a manner similar to the bottom 8 of the setting tray. Front end wall I 5 is provided with -a label holder and pull ZI. Rear end wall I'I is provided with a transverse-slot 22 which extends upwardly to a height suflicient'to receive the outwardly slid setting tray bottom 8 when the setting tray I is placed within hatching tray I4 upon bottom 20.

The upper edges of the side and end walls of hatching tray I4 are inwardly turned to form a reinforcing rim 23. Hatching tray I4 is further provided with a transverse reinforcing strap 24 which connects its side walls I5 at their bottom and which is attached thereto as by spot welding. This member 24 also provides a hand hold when removing or inserting the hatching tray in the hatching rack. Bottom 20 is providedv with an unperforated transverse reinforcing section 26 which is disposed in alignment with reinforcing strap 24 when the hatching tray bottom 20 is in its normal position inside the hatching tray. Bottom 29 is also provided with a peripheral inturned rim 21 which serves as a reinforcement and which elevates the bottom slightly in the hatching tray so as to give improved circulation of air. By having reinforcing strip 28 above reinforcing strap 24 a firm hand hold is provided for removal or insertion of the hatching'tray and sagging of the bottom 28 is prevented.

In order to facilitate sliding of hatching tray I 4 on a given surface such as during the insertion or removal in the hatching rack the bottom side portions thereof are provided with spot welded channel runners 28. These runners are disposed longitudinally as is clearly shown in the drawings. Where necessary these runners are beveled upwardly as at 29 in order to facilitate sliding.

These runners are preferablyonly three in number and are spaced substantially apartfrom one another thereby providingv a free spacertherebetween through which air may circulate between the tray bottom and the baille. These runners 28 support the tray with its bottom 28 substantially elevated so that circulation of air is obtained.

Figure 7 illustrates the cooperative relationship between the setting tray l and hatching'tray I4 during a transfer of eggs from the setting tray to the hatching tray. In this figure, the setting tray I h as been placed right side up upon the bottom 20 of the hatching tray, settingtray bottom 8 having first been pulled outwardly slightly, and tray I having beenV lowered and moved rearwardly to cause the initially projecting portion of bottom 8 to project through slot 22 ofthe hatching tray.Y After the described initial positioning has been effected, the operator 'grasps that portion of setting tray bottom' 8 which projects 'through slot 22 and pulls it'outwardly in the-direction of the arrow of Figure 7. This causes the eggs which formerly-rested upon setting tray bottom 8 to move downwardly into a position of rest upon hatching tray bottom 20. After setting tray bottom 8 has been completely removed out of the hatching tray slot 22, the setting tray frame is removed upwardly leaving the eggs on the hatching tray bottom 20. The eggs may then be evenly distributed over the larger area of the hatching tray, and they are then substantially horizontal, as indicated in Figure 9. The hatching tray I4 is then slid into a wheeled hatching tray rack designated generally as 30 (see Figures 9 and 10) being supported therein by horizontal angle bars 3l. Impervious baliles 32 are placed between the hatching trays and angle bars 3l, these baies 32 serving in the usual manner to prevent dust, down, etc. from being transferred downwardly from one tray to another.

In Figure `11 there is shown a modied form of hatching tray rack construction wherein the angle iron 3l is provided at its forward end with an upturned portion 33. In this figure the baille 32 is shown lying between the upper face of angle bar 3I and the lower face of the forward channel runner 28 of the hatching tray I4. This construction with the upturned ends of angle bars 3| prevents the hatching trays from sliding outwardly, it being necessary to lift the hatching tray in order to have it clear upturned lip 33 during the insertion or removal of hatching tray I4.

In Figures 8 and 13 to 16 inclusive there is illustrated a form of hatching tray wherein a full length runner 34 is providedl on each side of the hatching'tray. This runner is a semi-circular extension of the sides I of the hatching tray and is integral therewith. The runner 34 is pron vided with two rows of square perforations 35. These-perforations 35 are similar to those used on the sides, ends and bottom of the hatching tray and setting tray. These perforations 35 are disposed opposite to one another so that free circulation of air is provided from the outside directly inwardly into the space between baille 32 and tray bottom 20. The lowermost portion of runner 34 is a continuous strip 36 which serves as the runner proper, slidably engaging with the upper surface of baille 32 or with any other surface or edge upon which the hatching tray may be slid or placed. This portion 35 constitutes the strip of metal left between the two rows of upwardly curved perforations. The tray bottom 2l] is supported on the upper inward edge 31 of lrunner 34, with the intu'rned rim 21 disposed outwardly and below edge 31.

The setting and hatching trays described here- `in result .in better hatching percentages by a1- lowing'air to enter the trays transversely through the -side and end wall perforations. `The improved circulation thus brought about-is particularly advantageous in thehatching tray where poor circulation has hitherto been common. The

between the baie 32 and the rtray bottom' 20 through the long free spaces between runners 28 but does not enter in a manner corresponding t kthat shown by the arrows A in Figure 8. 1

The form of the hatching tray of Figures 8 and 13 to 16 inclusive is advantageous because the runner 34 is a full length runner supporting the tray over its entire bottom above any surface or edge upon which it may be placed or slid, thereby preventing injury to the toes of chicks projecting through the perforations in the bottom 20. As will be apparent, the form of hatching tray of Figures 4 to 6 is apt to cause injury to the chicks in this manner unless the operator exerts special care to hold the tray in such a manner that bottom 20 does not slide against or close to any surface. In addition, the full length runners provide a better sliding action when the unit is inserted or removed from the hatching rack.

In Figure 12 a modified form of setting tray is shown in which a rim 6a for holding the sliding bottom 8 in place is formed integral with the side wall 2, thereby simplifying the construction and making a lighter weight tray while retaining all of the advantages of the setting tray previously described.

I wish it to be understood that I intend to include as within my invention such modiiications and adaptations thereto as fall within the spirit of the terms of the appended claims.

Having thus fully described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A hatching tray having sides and a perforated bottom, said sides extending below said bottom and being provided with an inwardly directed arcuate flange to provide runner means extending continuously along said sides, said runner means being perforated to allow access of air transversely to said bottom and thence to the interior of said tray.

2. A hatching tray having side walls and runner means along the bottom of the sides for` supporting a bottom of said tray and for facilitating sliding of the tray upon -a supporting surface, a perforated tray bottom supported by said runner means at. a distance above a supporting surface, said runner means extending continuously the length of the tray and being perforated in a manner to allow access of air to the space below said bottom and thus to the interior of the tray and providing a continuous runner.

3. A hatching tray having side walls, runner.

cluding an inwardly and upwardly curved arcuate extension of the bottom thereof which engages the supporting surface for the tray, a perforated bottom in said tray resting upon the upper inner edge of said runner means, said runner means having perforations in the arcuate portions adjacent the portion which engages the supporting surface for the tray for permitting circulation of air transversely from outside said tray to the space below said bottom and thence to the interior of said tray.

4. A hatching-tray having side walls, continuous runner means on the lower portion of said side walls constituting an integral extension thereto which is turned inwardly and upwardly, and a tray bottom supported by said runner means with its edges spaced inwardly from said side walls, said runner means being perforated to allow air to circulate through the perforations directly between the interior of the tray and the exterior thereof.

5. A hatching tray having said walls, continuous runner means on the lower portion of said side walls constituting an integral extension thereto which is turned inwardly and upwardly, a tray bottom supported by said runner means with its edges spaced inwardly fromy said side walls, and means for establishing the spaced relationship of the tray bottom edges with respect the side walls, said runner means being perforated to allow air to circulate through the perforations directly between the interior of the tray and the exterior thereof.

6. A hatching tray having side walls, continuous runner means on the lower portion of said side walls constituting an integral extension thereto which is turned inwardly and upwardly, and a tray bottom supported by said runner means with its edges spaced inwardly from said side walls, said bottom having means to retain the same in proper spaced relationship with respect said walls, said runner means being perforated t0 allow air to circulate through the perforations directly between the interior of the tray and the exterior thereof. Y

CHARLES F. GEDGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3147737 *Aug 11, 1961Sep 8, 1964Rockwood & CoApparatus for incubating eggs
US3147738 *Aug 30, 1962Sep 8, 1964Rockwood & CoEgg incubating tray with rack and pallet
US3817215 *May 16, 1973Jun 18, 1974Levin GEgg incubating tray with rack and carrier
US4004552 *Jun 9, 1975Jan 25, 1974Gerd LevinEgg incubating tray with rack and slide
US5046454 *Dec 13, 1989Sep 10, 1991Funki A/STray system for incubation and hatching operations, method during use of the tray system and use of the tray system
US5146871 *Sep 24, 1991Sep 15, 1992Chick Master Incubator CompanyIncubator and hatcher tray
US5181818 *Mar 20, 1991Jan 26, 1993Kao CorporationMethod for shifting goods and apparatus therefor
US5332363 *Nov 4, 1992Jul 26, 1994Kao CorporationMethod for shifting goods and apparatus therefor
US5427492 *Feb 8, 1994Jun 27, 1995Kao CorporationMethod for shifting goods and apparatus therefor
US5568791 *Mar 6, 1995Oct 29, 1996Dratt; RainerIncubation method and apparatus therefor
US5588792 *Mar 16, 1995Dec 31, 1996Tiso; AllanPipette tip rack loader
US5819685 *Feb 19, 1997Oct 13, 1998Molded Fiber Glass CompaniesTray for raising insect larva
US6581356 *Sep 24, 2001Jun 24, 2003Jun H. KimTablet dispensing and packaging system
US7451583May 29, 2007Nov 18, 2008Jvm Co., Ltd.Automatic medicine packaging machine with door lock unit
US7549268Apr 23, 2007Jun 23, 2009Jvm Co., Ltd.Division-packaging method and apparatus for automatic medicine packaging machine
US7641073Jan 17, 2007Jan 5, 2010Jvm Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for preventing irregular packaging for automatic medicine packing machine
US7669733Nov 8, 2006Mar 2, 2010Jun Ho KimCassette device for automatic medicine packaging apparatus
US7894656May 29, 2007Feb 22, 2011Jvm Co., LtdMethod and apparatus for inspecting manual dispensing tray of automatic medicine packaging machine
US8239214Jan 26, 2007Aug 7, 2012Jvm Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for backing up power failure for automatic medicine packing machine
WO2003086060A1 *Apr 15, 2003Oct 23, 2003Hubbard IsaMethod for incubation and hatching of bird's eggs and device for carrying out the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification119/322, 414/414, 414/404
International ClassificationA01K41/00, A01K41/06
Cooperative ClassificationA01K41/065
European ClassificationA01K41/06B