Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2255066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1941
Filing dateOct 20, 1939
Priority dateOct 20, 1939
Publication numberUS 2255066 A, US 2255066A, US-A-2255066, US2255066 A, US2255066A
InventorsLamb Edgar Quinn
Original AssigneeLamb Edgar Quinn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot manipulating device
US 2255066 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

sept. 9, 1941. E. Q LAMB 2,255,066

FOOT MANIPULATING DEVICE Filed oct. 2o, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEYS Sept. 9, 1941. E. Q. LAMB FOOT MANIPULATING DEVICE' Filed Oct. 20, 19379 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Gr Q. Lomb.

Edg BYQMXM Wl/1M y ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 9, 1941 'rv opi-rice roo'r MANIPULATiNG nevica l Edgar Quinn Lamb, Columbus, Ohio Application October 2i), 1939, Serial No. 300,416 Y 1 claim. (c1. 12S-.252)

My yinvention relates to a foot manipulating device. It has to do, more particularly, with a device for manipulating the joints of the feet inr order to stretch the ligaments, muscles and f-acia around the joints so as to restore normal motion to various joints of the feet and ankles.

In the past, several diierent types of devices have been provided for treating the-feet to overcomeabnormalities thereof. One type of device has consisted in means for vibrating the entire foot.V Obviously, this would not produce proper manipulation of the joints of the foot. Other devices have consisted of means for massaging the foot, particularly the arch thereof, and usually embody rollers for operating on the arch to massage it. Obviously, this method also will not result in the proper manipulation of all of the joints of the foot and ankle.

pressure on the arch of the foot and a vertically directed pressure on the toes of the foot. This also does not produce the necessary manipulation of all oi the joints of the foot.

I have found in actual practice that one of the most common ailments of the footis what is known in the profession as pronation of the foot. I have also found that in order to properly treat the foot to overcome this abnormality and to restore the foot to normal condition, it is necessary to apply simultaneously at intervalsV an upward pressure on the arch, a downward pull, on the toes and a lateral outward pull on the heel. This overcomes pronation of the foot and restores normal motion to` the various joints of the foot and ankle. I have found in attempts to treat this condition that it is impossible for the practitioner to manipulate the foot of the patient by hand inorder to obtain the required movements.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a foot manipulating device which is of such a nature thatthe foot may be manipulated, particularly in the manner indicated in the preceding paragraph, to restore it to normal condition.

Another object of my invention is to provide a device of the type indicated which is of a very simple and inexpensive/structure but which is still very eective.

Another object of my invention is to provide a device Vof the type indicated which may be easily and quickly adjusted for treating feet of various sizes.

Another object of my invention is to provide a device of the type indicatedwhich is of such a nature that when the foot is positioned on the Another device hasY been provided winch exerts a vertically directed'A device, no further attention by the operator is required to produce the desired manipulation.

The preferred embodiment of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings where` in similar characters of reference designate corresponding parts and wherein:

. Figure 1 is a perspective view, partly broken away, of a device made according to my invention. v v

Figure 2 is fa view-partly inend elevation fand partlyY in section Figure 1.

Y Figure 3 is a detail, partly in section and partly in elevation, illustrating the arch manipulating means. v I y Figure 4 isla similar view illustrating nipulating means for the toes.

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 5 5 of Figure 2.

, Figure 6 is a perspective view illustrating how my' device acts onthe foot.

Figure '7 is adiagrammatic View illustrating how the footis positioned on my device.

Figure 8 shows an arch manipulating unit of a the maj, modied form.-

Figure 9 shows a modiiied form of a unit forV manipulating the toes. Y

-With reference to the drawings, I have illustrated my machine as comprisinga base I which hasan inclined top plate 2'. This top plate 2 carries a-heel manipulating unit 3, an arch manipulating unit 4, and a unit 5 for manipulating the toes whichV are disposed inflongitudinally spaced relationship from the lower end to thetop foot only.

v The plate 2V carriesA a longitudinally extendingv unit 6 which isA suitably secured thereto Yand which extends throughout the length `thereof. The lower portion of this unit 6 has a guide portion 'l formed thereon.` This unit 6 has upstand-A ing portions at each end in which a shaft 8-` is unit 8 is adapted to carry the variousfunits 3,Y

4 and 5.

The unit 3 comprises asubstantially U-shapedA base member l2. This member l2 has portions I3 of the' structure shownV in for cooperating with the guide portion 1 of the unit 6. Thus the member I2 will be slidably mounted on the base plate 2 for movement longitudinally thereof. has a pair of spaced upwardly and outwardly eX- tending arms I4. A bracket member I5 has similarly spaced downwardly extending portions I6 which are pivotally connected to the portion I4 by a pivot pin I1. Each of the members I5 carries on its upper end a heel receiving and clamping unit I8.

The unit I8 consists of a base plate I9 which is slidably disposed in guide ways I9a carried by the upper portions of the bracket I5. A pair of members 20, adapted to cooperate with each other to form a socket for receiving the heel, are mounted 0n plate I9 in such a manner that they may be adjusted towards and from each other. Each of these members has a depending lug 2I extending downwardly through a slot in the plate I9. A screw member 22 is threaded through openings formed in these lugs. It will be apparent that by operating this screw 22, the members can be adjusted towards and from each other. Members 2D carry a set of straps 28a which may pass around the back part of the foot to hold the heel in position in the member 20. As indicated in Figure 2, the straps may carry a felt portion 23 and the members 20 may be lined with felt 24 to prevent injury to the foot.

Each of the pins I1 carries a substantially horizontally disposed lever 25. 'Ihis lever 25 has a bushing portion 26 through which the pin eX- tends. Spacers 21 are provided between the ends of the bushing and the depending portions I6 of bracket I5 in order to keep the lever in its proper position substantially midway between the portion I6. On its inner end, this lever is provided with a yoke 28 which embraces a cam 29 that is keyed to or formed on the shaft 8. The outer portion of the lever carries a cylindrical socket 30. This socket 30 receives a vertically disposed pin 3I which is free to move vertically therein. 'I'he upper end of this pin is pivoted at 32 to a lug depending from the plate I9 of the heel clamping unit I8. In order to keep the plate I9 seated in the guide portions I9a a spring 33 is provided. This spring is connected to the socket portion 30, as at 34, and to a hook 35 depending from the plate I9. The spring will exert a downward pull on the plate I9 and hold it in position.

It will be apparent that when the cam 29 is rotated, both of the levers 25 will be swung about their respective pivot points I1. This, in turn, will cause lateral swinging of the pins 3I which will produce lateral movement of the units I8 on the upper ends of the brackets I5. During this lateral movement of the units I8 on the brackets I5, the brackets will also swing to a limited extent about the pivot points I1. Thus, it will be apparent that with this structure lateral movement and very slight vertical movement of the heel receiving and clamping units I8 will be produced.

The arch manipulating unit 4 comprises a U- shaped bracket 36. This bracket is provided on, its lower end with portions 31 which cooperate with the guide portion 1 of the unit 6. The bracket 36 may be moved along the guide portion 1 but is held in a predetermined position by means of the bolts 38. The bracket 36 (Figure 3,) has outwardly and upwardly extending leg portions 39. These portions are joined together at their upper -endsY by a horizontal portion 40 At each side the member I2 which carries a sleeve 4I. In this sleeve is disposed a pin 42 which is free to move vertically therein. An arch-engaging member 43 is mounted on the upper end of this pin. This member 43 is provided with a socket 44 on its lower surface which receives the pin and a set screw 45 is provided for maintaining the member 43 in proper position on the upper end of the pin. The lower end of the pin 42 is pivotally connected by a pin and slot connection as at 46 to the outer end of a substantially horizontally disposed lever 41. This lever is pivotally carried by the leg portions 39 of the bracket 36. 'Ihe inner end of this lever is provided with a yoke 49 which engages a cam 50 keyed to or formed on the shaft 8. It will be apparent that when the cam 50 is rotated, vertical movement of both of the arch engaging members 43 will be produced. This movement will be caused by the lever 41 swinging about the pivot points 48 and moving the pins 42 vertically in the sleeves 4I. The pin 42 and socket portion 44 are relatively adjustable telescoping members so that the height of member 43 may be adjusted to suit different patients.

The unit 5 for manipulating the toes comprises a U-shaped bracket 5I which is substantially identical with the bracket 36. Each of these brackets 5I (Figure 4) extends outwardly and upwardly and carries a sleeve 52 at its upper end. This sleeve 52 receives a pin 53 which is free to move vertically therein. The upper end of the pin 53 carries a toe-receiving and clamping unit 54. This unit 54 has a depending socket member 55 which receives the upper end of the pin and which is provided with a set screw 56 for maintaining the unit 54 in position on the pin. The lower end of the pin 53 is pivotally connected by a pin and slot connection 51 to the outer end of a substantially horizontally disposed lever 58. 'I'his lever 58 is pivotally carried by a pin 59 supported on the bracket 5I. The inner end of this lever has a yoke 60 formed thereon which embraces an elongated cam 6I carried by or formed as a part of the shaft 8. It will be apparent that when the cam 6I is rotated the levers 58 will be swung about the pivot points 59 and will produce vertical movement of the pins 53 in the sleeves 52.

Each of the units 54 is provided with a set of straps 62 by means of which the toes or the forward part of the foot may be clamped in position. Suitable felt pads 63 are provided on this unit to prevent injury to the foot. The arch engaging units 43 may also be provided with pads 64.

The brackets 5I of the unit 5 is provided with guide portions 65 on its lower edge which cooperate with guide portion 1 of the unit 6. Thus bracket 5I will be mounted for sliding movement longitudinally of the base plate 2. The bracket 5I is provided with a depending portion 66 substantially at the middle thereof which is provided with a threaded opening through which the threaded portion of a shaft 61 is passed. This shaft 61 extends longitudinally of the unit 6 and its ends are rotatably mounted in the upJ standing portions at each end thereof. As indicated in Figure 3, the shaft 61 does not engage the bracket 36 but passes beneath this bracket. The member I2 of the unit 3 is provided with a depending portion 68 which is provided with a threaded opening through which a threaded portion of the shaft 61 passes. The threaded portion of shaft 61 which engages member I2 and the threaded portion which engages the bracket 5I are of opposite pitch so that when the shaft 5l is rotated the units 3 and 5 will be moved towards or away from each other longitudinally of the base plate 2. The shaft 51 may be rotated by means of a knurled knob B9. The unit 3 will be adjusted to a predetermined position and will not be aiected by rotation of the shaft 6'1. The cams 29 and 6I are elongated to permit the longitudinal adjustment of the units 3 and 5 without disturbing the engagement of the yokes 28 and El! with these respective cams.

In the treatment of the patient with this machine, the feet are positioned thereon and the units 3 and 5 are properly adjusted relative to each other. Then the feet are fastened in position by the various straps. A motor Il is then energized which will produce rotation of the shaft 8. This will cause rotation of cams 29, 5i) and 6I. Consequently, the heel engaging units i8 will be moved laterally and vertically to a slight extent, the arch engaging members 43 will be moved vertically and the units 44 for engaging the forward portions of the feet will also be moved vertically. I prefer to have the various cams separate from the shaft 8 so that they may be rotated thereon to various positions relative to each other and held in adjusted position by suitable set screws. In this manner, the various movements may be timed o1' regulated relative to each other.

The position of the foot on my device is illustrated in Figures 5, 6 and '7. I prefer to have the cams so adjusted that simultaneously at intervals the members 43 will provide upward pressure on the arches, the units 54 will produce a downward pull on the forward portion of the feet and the units I8 will produce a lateral outward pull on the heels. This treatment overcomes pronation of the feet and restores normal motion to the various joints of the foot and ankle.

In Figure 8, I show a somewhat modied type of arch manipulating unit. This unit is for the left foot but the unit for the right foot will be the same except it will be reversed. In this lnstance, the arch-engaging member 54a is pivoted as at 64b, to the upper end of the vertically reciprocable pin 42a. At a point spaced laterally outwardly from the pivot point 64b, adjacent the outer edge of member 64a, a pin 64e is pivotally connected, as at 54d, to member 64a. The pin 64e passes downwardly through an opening formed in an extension 40a of the bracket 39. This pin 64e carries a stop 64e which engages member 40a to limit the lowermost position of pin 54o. The lower end of this pin freely passes through an opening in an arm 42h which is secured to pin 42a. Pin 64e is provided with a spring 641* surrounding it and disposed between a stop 54g, carried by it, and the arm 42h. With this structure when the pin 42a moves upwardly, the pin 64o will also move therewith until stop 64g engages member 40a, when the member 64a will be swung outwardly around the pivot point 64b, due to the fact that pin 42a will continue to move upwardly while pin 64o will not. Thus, the member 64a not only moves vertically into engagement with the arch but, at the time it engages the arch, it is also rocked outwardly at an angle. This results in additional manipulation of the arch which is very desirable.

In Figure 9, I show a slightly modiiied form of unit for manipulating the toes. This unit is for the left foot but the unit for the right foot will is connected to members 54a, and 55a. When theY rod 53a moves downwardly, the stop 54e carried by member 54a will strike the stop 54o. This will cause the member 54a to tilt inwardly about the pivot point 54h. Thus, the member 54a will move downwardly and will simultaneously tilt inwardly. This will produce a twisting of the forward part of the foot.

The units illustrated in Figures 8 and 9 are preferably used together so that as the member 64a moves upwardly and swings outwardly, the member 54a will move downwardly and will swing inwardly. However, either of these units may be employed with the other units illustrated in Figure 1.

It will be apparent from the preceding description that I have provided a foot manipulating machine which will manipulate the joints of the feet in order to stretch the ligaments, muscles and facia around the joints so as to restore normal motion to the various joints of the feet and ankles. Although my device is very simple, it is very eiective. It may be readily adjusted for different patients. Furthermore, it is of such a nature that little or no attention is required from the operator.

Various other objects and advantages will be apparent from the preceding description, the drawings, and the following claim.

Having thus described my invention what I claim is:

A foot manipulating device comprising a base member, a unit for engaging the forward portion of the foot, said unit being supported on a vertically disposed pin, means for moving said pin vertically, said means comprising a lever pivoted intermediate its ends and having one end connected to said pin, the other end of said lever having a portion engaging a cam, said cam being supported on a shaft rotatably mounted on said base, a unit for engaging the arch of the foot, said unit being supported on a vertically disposed pin, means for moving said pin vertically, said means comprising a lever pivoted intermediate its ends and having one end connected to said pin, the other end of said lever having a portion engaging a cam carried by said shaft, a unit for engaging the heel of the foot, said unit including a heel supporting member mounted for lateral movement, means for producing said movement, said means comprising a lever operatively connected to said member, said lever being pivoted intermediate its ends and having a portion engaging a cam carried by said shaft.

EDGAR Q. LAMB.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2513197 *Aug 11, 1948Jun 27, 1950Moshier Charles CFoot exercising machine
US2542221 *Dec 7, 1948Feb 20, 1951Wendell E KindleyFoot massaging and vibrating device
US4577861 *Jun 4, 1984Mar 25, 1986Brigham Young UniversityExercise machine for limb extremity digits
US4802494 *Oct 2, 1986Feb 7, 1989Sports Bio-Mechanics Research Inc.Measurement of the neutral alignment position of the foot
US4862875 *Mar 29, 1988Sep 5, 1989Samuel HeatonLeg exercisers
US5029575 *Oct 24, 1986Jul 9, 1991Zhivotchenko Vladimir DWalking-simulating apparatus for persons with restricted mobility
US5094226 *Oct 31, 1990Mar 10, 1992Mark T. MedcalfContinuous passive motion device for the first metatarsal phalangeal joint
US5255188 *Sep 16, 1991Oct 19, 1993Jace Systems, Inc.Universal controller for continuous passive motion devices
US5297540 *Jan 29, 1992Mar 29, 1994Jace Systems, Inc.Continuous passive motion orthosis device for a toe
US5407418 *Oct 14, 1993Apr 18, 1995Szpur; RomanPulsating compressor apparatus for enhancing blood flow
US5452205 *Oct 1, 1993Sep 19, 1995Jace Systems, Inc.Universal controller for continuous passive motion devices
US5682327 *Dec 20, 1994Oct 28, 1997Jace Systems, Inc.Universal controller for continuous passive motion devices
US6932778 *Aug 14, 2003Aug 23, 2005Jean-Claude HirtMuscular relaxation machine for relaxation of leg muscles
US7179236Jun 7, 2001Feb 20, 2007Galvez Campos Jose LuisSystem for exercising the lower extremities in seated persons
US7575560 *Sep 28, 2005Aug 18, 2009Panasonic Electric Works Co., Ltd.Foot massaging apparatus with rotatable roller and toe pinching unit
US7874996 *Sep 2, 2005Jan 25, 2011Ermi CorporationMethod and apparatus for manipulating a toe joint
DE924891C *Jan 25, 1953Mar 10, 1955Steinmueller Gmbh L & CHeilbehandlungstisch mit beweglicher Tischplatte
EP0266071A1 *Oct 2, 1987May 4, 1988Sports Bio-Mechanics Research Inc.,Measurement of the neutral alignment position of the foot
EP1211978A1 *Sep 13, 2000Jun 12, 2002Neil Robert SmithApparatus and method for prescribing and manufacturing orthotic foot devices
WO1988002236A1 *Oct 2, 1987Apr 7, 1988Orange John R SMeasurement of the neutral alignment position of the foot
WO2002045644A1 *Jun 7, 2001Jun 13, 2002Campos Jose Luis GalvezSystem for exercising the lower extremities in seated persons
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/29
International ClassificationA61H1/02, A61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2201/1642, A61H2201/1215, A61H2201/1669, A61H2201/1418, A61H2201/0192, A61H1/0266
European ClassificationA61H1/02L5