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Publication numberUS2256768 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1941
Filing dateOct 14, 1940
Priority dateOct 14, 1940
Publication numberUS 2256768 A, US 2256768A, US-A-2256768, US2256768 A, US2256768A
InventorsTaylor Thomas K
Original AssigneeTaylor Thomas K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fishing line sinker
US 2256768 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 23, 1941. T. K. TAYLOR 2,256,768

FISHING LINE SINKER Filed Oct. 14, 1940 v arwe/wtoc zwmms K1 fa /Zorn Patented Sept. 23, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FISHING LINE SINKER Thomas K. Taylor, Berlin, Md.

Application October 14, 1940, Serial No. 361,143

8 Claims.

This invention relates to fishing line sinkers and is useful both for hand lines as well as rod casting and trolling.

One of the difiiculties experienced with conventional sinkers is their tendency to wobble or jiggle in the water in response to pressures created by the presence of waves, currents and eddies. Suhh movement of the sinker is not conductive to retaining a taut line and, moreover, frequently gives a false indication of a nibble or a bite. Both of these conditions are sources of aggravation to a fisherman. Moreover, the use of a sinker which offers appreciable wind resistance interferes with casting as does the necessity for an unduly heavy.sinker, and this latter characteristic also detracts from the sensitivity of the line.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a sinker which will be self-anchoring in the sand or mud. That is, the sinker is so constructed that (1) it will embed itself in the ooze, (2) it oiiers a minimum of flat surface resistance to pressures set up by waves, currents and eddies; and (3) such currents actually build up a protective sand or mud anchoring foundation about the sinker somewhat after the manner of a jetty. Thus, the usually experienced dragging of the sinker indicated by jiggling or wobbling thereof and the formation of slack in the line are reduced to a minimum.

Another object of the invention is to provide a sinker which will always come to rest in longitudinally extended position so as to assure that the sinker will promptly anchor itself.

A further object of the invention is to provide a sinker which is free from obstructions such as would cause the hooks to catch in the sinker when the line is being thrown out. Hence, there is no danger of the sinker producing entanglement of the line.

In addition "to-the foregoing objects, it is an equally important object of the invention to provide a sinker having reduced wind resistance which is quite important in rod casting.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a sinker which, by reason of its construction, is appreciably lighter than a sinker which would customarily have to be used in order to hold the line to the bottom and in taut condition. This likewise contributes to better casting, enables a less expensive sinker to be sed, and also makes the line more sensitive to a bite or nibble.

The sinker of the present invention may be cheaply manufactured and sold at the modest price generally associated with such articles.

In the accompanying drawing, I have illustrated a preferred embodiment of the invention. It is to be understood that the construction is subject to modification within the scope of the invention which is considered to include a structure capable of particularly producing the advantages above recited as well as other improved results.

Referring to the drawing,

Figure l is a side elevation of the sinker;

Figure .2 is a rear elevation thereof;

Figure 3 is a view partly in side elevation and partly in section;

Figure 4 is a front elevation; and

Figure 5 is a view showing the sinker longitudinally extended and resting on the bottom with one of its enlarged relatively sharp angled sides embedded in the sand or mud and with the sand or mud forming a protective barrier or casing about the head and body of the sinker.

The sinker of this invention is preferably constructed of lead or other suitable metal which is not afiected by fresh or sea water and which may be cheaply molded or cast.

Referring to Figure 1, the sinker includes at its heavy end an enlarged head Iii. This head may be of any desired shape which will produce the advantages herein described. It is here illustrated and is preferably of generally frust'ropyramidal configuration. In the form shown, the head includes a triangular base ll forming the face of the sinker as shown in Figure 4 and sides I2 extending in in clined relation inwardly and rearwardly thereof as shown in Figures 1, 2

and 5. Preferably, but not necessarily, the

pyramidal structure is equi-angular or equilateral. For example, in a 4 ounce sinker which is a popular size, the face angles a, b and c are equal, i. e., angles, as are the side angles d, e and f. Thus, the edges of the base are of equal length and the sides of the pyramidal-shaped head are of equal area and have a relatively sharp slope with respect to the base H and to each other, e. g., 60. The marginal edge portion [3 of the face 11 which is defined by the joint between the base I i and the angularly disposed sides i 2 is preferably relatively sharp as shown. .A suitable eye 14 for attaching the line to the sinker is molded into the head and extends outwardly therefrom substantially centrally of the face II as shown in Figures 3 andA.

This construction of the head allows a substantial amount of weight to be located at the ter of the face H.

enlarged end of the sinker and it will be observed here that the only substantial flat area is on the front. or face of the heavy end. In this connection, the face ll may be curved if desired, but this is not necessary and, in fact, the flat face cooperates to assist in the self-anchoring of the sinker. Moreover, the construction described permits a symmetrical sinker to be produced having a body of progressively decreased weight.

The greatest cross-sectional area of the sinker is defined by the face II, and the frustro-pyramidal head is extended rearwardly to form, within lines or planes projected from the perimeter of the face II, an integral tapering elongated body I of less cross-sectional area than the It will be observed that this body is substantially conical, affording a progressive decrease in weight from the head'to'the end'of I the sinker and is considerably longer than the' 1 head. The body is rounded in cross-section substantially throughout its length and terminates face ll.

preferably in a rounded end I6.

The head and body are integrally joined in the molding of the fluid metal by merging of i the body into the inclined sides of the head as shown in Figures 1 and 5. That is, portions ll. of the body are molded integral with the sides l2 of the pyramidal structure, substantially centrally with respect to each of the sides, forming 1 curved ridges of progressively increasing arcuate 1 dimension as shown at l8. The sides are thus interrupted by the curved ridges and present a minimum of flat surface area. ridges form with the sides an anchoring surface 1 when the sinker is resting in the sand or mud.

Moreover, the

By reason of the rounded construction of the 1 body and the manner in which it is integrally j connected to the head, as well as the construction of the head, namely, the steep angle of its sides li, there is presented relatively little fiat surface resistance to the action of waves, currents and eddies as compared to the usual sinker 3 and which cause the conventional sinker to wobble or jiggle. That is to say, the water will swish sinker.

The body is centered with relation to the cenpasses through the center of the face H whereby should the sinker land on any of the corners of the head, the weight is so distributed as to edges 43 as shown in Figure 5. The body with its progressively decreased weight away from the head also contributes to this result in'that there In other. words, the sinker will 7 Referring to Figure 3, it will be observed that 1 since the head has sloping sides and the body extends from the head within lines defining the greatest area of the sinker, namely, lines .pro-

v jectedfromthe' face ii and is of conical COD:

figuration, there is defined by the head and body, a recess I9 on each side of the head. This recess extends longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and around the same, and is unobstructed. It progressively decreases in area rearwardly from beneath the adjacent side of the head to near the end of the body as shown.

Referring to Figure 5, the provision of the recess allows the head, by reason of its location at the heavy end and its sloping side to quickly embed itself and anchor the sinker in the ooze of the bottom without tipping up the tapering body which has sufficient weight to overcome this possibility and cause the sinker to always lie in longitudinally extended position. Moreover, the recess permits the currents and eddies to pass under the sinker and there is built up a sand or mud casing or anchoring foundation which fills up the recess l9 and also extends about the body and the head in much the same manner, as. a jetty will buildup a sand beach. The smooth configuration of the head and body presenting a minimum of flat surface reduces substantially the tendency of the sinker to move in response to pressures created by waves, currents or eddies. It will be observed, therefore, that the structure of the sinker'and the configuration thereof cooperate substantially in en hancing the anchoring function of the sinker. Moreover, this anchoring of the head is assisted by the provision of the ridge in the side wall of the head which creates a somewhat irregular surface for engagement with the mud or sand The presence of the flat surface area H insofar as itmight be responsive to the pressures'of currents, eddies or waves to move the sinker is That is, the axis of the body cause the sinker to come to rest on one of the the mud or sand casing. As stated above, if desired, the face Il may have a rounded contour, but since it does not cause movement of the sinker as will be appreciated, this is not necessary. The important consideration is to have the sinker anchored at its heavy end and to have the weight so distributed that the bodyacts to at all times exert the pressure of its weight upon the head, whereby the head is embedded and the body engages the bottom withthe area of the recess l9 completely filled with sand or mud. Since the sinker is anchored at its. heavy end, and for the major portion of its exposed sur-' face, presents a rounded contour and at its head has a combined curved and sharp sloping contour, the water swishes about the lateral area,

sary, the fishing line is more sensitive to a bite.

or nibble. The lighter weight sinker, of course, greatly facilitates casting and drawing in the line and, moreover, enables a less expensive sinker to be used.

I claim:

1. A fishing line sinker having an enlarged head at one end, and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction extending away from said head, said head and body defining recesses extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and on all sides.

2. A fishing line sinker having a substantially frustro pyramidal head at one end, and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction extending away from said head, said head and body definin recesses extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and on all sides.

3. A fishing line sinker having an enlarged head at one end, and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction extending away from said head, said head and body defining recesses extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and around the same and decreasing in area from said head toward the free end of said body.

4. A fishing line sinker having an enlarged head at one end, and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction extending away from said head, said head and body defining recesses extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and around the same, said body having a rounded surface.

5. A fishing line sinker having a substantially frustro pyramidal head at one end, and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction extending away from said head, said body merging into said head and forming ridges on the surfaces of the sides of the head, said head and body defining an unobstructed recess extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and continuously around the same.

6. A fishing rod sinker having an enlarged substantially frustro pyramidal head at one end, said head having a triangular front face, and an integral elongated tapering body of reduced crosssection extending from said head, said head and body defining an unobstructed recess extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and continuously around the same, said recess decreasing in area from said head toward the end of said body and said body having a rounded surface.

7. A fishing line sinker having an enlarged head at one end and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction away from said head, said head and body defining recesses extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker on all sides of the same, one wall of each recess being longer than another and the recess decreasing in area from said head toward the free end of said body.

8. A fishing line sinker having an enlarged head at one end and an integral elongated body progressively reduced in cross-section in a direction extending away from said head, said head and body definin a recess extending longitudinally of the surface of the sinker and continuously on all sides of the same.

THOMAS K. TAYLOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2644266 *Jul 18, 1952Jul 7, 1953Updegrove Lawrence FFishing line sinker
US4888911 *Apr 18, 1988Dec 26, 1989Pritchard Kelvin R DSinker
US5101592 *Jan 2, 1991Apr 7, 1992Merritt Roy KFishing weight
US7257921 *Jun 7, 2006Aug 21, 2007Hellmann Paul FDuck decoy anchor
US7340858 *Dec 24, 2004Mar 11, 2008I.Q. Innovations, LlcSlip-on hydrodynamic symmetrical fishing sinker
US7621072 *Jul 26, 2007Nov 24, 2009Brasseur Bernard PStackable casting sinker
Classifications
U.S. Classification43/44.96
International ClassificationA01K95/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01K95/00
European ClassificationA01K95/00