Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2259771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1941
Filing dateJan 30, 1939
Priority dateJan 30, 1939
Publication numberUS 2259771 A, US 2259771A, US-A-2259771, US2259771 A, US2259771A
InventorsChester C Oberly
Original AssigneeTokheim Oil Tank & Pump Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing pump
US 2259771 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 21, 1941. C. c. OBERLY DISPENSING PUMP Filed Jan. 50, 1939 s Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. fl/zeder CObZz DJ ATTORNEYS.

Oct. 21 1941'. c c. OBERLY I 2,259,771

DISPENSING PUMP I Filed Jan. 30, 1939 e Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY6.

Oct. 21, 1941. 'c. c. OBERLY DISPENSING PUMP 6 Shets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 50, 1939 \m u Y on INF I +m +m nl W n I on mmf WV! 3 ii l1 x I A: .2... w al ll a... S a... m m i. S e- 4H" .ilm m Q9 3. on 21 Ti? om. 3 Nu 3 n INVENTOR. Z'ZrCObeZLZy ATTORNEY5.

Oct. 21, '1941.

C. C. OBERLY DISPENSI-NG PUMP Filed Jan. 30, 1939.

e Sheets-Shet 4 il ll INVENTOR. Cheater (Ob erg ATTORNEYS.

Oct. 21, 1941. c. c. OBERLY 2,259,771

, DISPENSING PUMP I Filed Jan. 30; 1959 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 IN VENT OR.

Ckea Zer Ubery ATTORNEYS.

But. 21, 1941. c. c. OBERLY 2,259,771

- DISPENS ING PUMP I vFiled Jan. 30, 1.939 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 fie-5 Q60 I rfi mq.

BY: 5 m E g ATTORNEYS.

' Patented met. 21, i941 TED v STATES PAT attain DISPENSING PW Chester 0. Oberly, Fort Wayne, Ind

assignor to Tokhe'im Oil Tank and Pump Company, Fort Wayne, Ind., a corporation of Indiana Application January 30, 1939,,Serial No. 253,486

23 Claims.

becomes entrained in the gasoline as the same is withdrawn from a' point adjacent the bottom of the tank. This entrained water is dispensed along withthe gasoline and therefore the purchaser not only receives a less amount of gasoline than he pays for, but he also receives the entrained water which, more particularly in the winter time, interferes with the proper operation of the dispensing pump and also the purchasers automobile.

The accumulated water in the presence of the gasoline in the metal gasoline tank also causes the formation of a certain corrosion product which appears as a. gray-green slime and which analysis has shown to be principally iron oxide 78.52% and water combinedwith organic matter 14.11%. Particles of this corrosion product also become entrained in the gasoline drawn through the dispensing line with the result that the registering accuracy of the dispensing pump is detrimentally afiected and also the accumulation of such matter in a users automobile interferes with the proper operation thereof.

It is accordingly an object of applicant's invention to provide a method and apparatus for dispensing gasoline whereby the entrained water,

and/or this corrosion product may be separated from the gasoline during thecontinuous flow of the gasolinethrough the dispensing line.

More particularly it is an object of applicant's invention to provide means for separating-the entrained water and/or this corrosion product from the gasoline during passage of'the gasoline from the underground supply tank to the suction side of the power operated pump of the gasoline dispensing pump.

An ancillary object of applicants invention is to provide separating means of remarkably small cubical capacity disposed between the suction inlet or the pumping element and the underground tank for separating all water from the gasoline, as the gasoline is continuously forced through the dispensing line, thereby to improve the efliciency and extend the life of said pumping element.

provide, in a gasoline dispensing pump, means cooperating with a water separator for indicating the existence of a predetermined amount of water in such water separator and for disabling the dispensing pump-if a greater predetermined amount of water is allowed to accumulate in the separator. I

A further object of the invention is to provide in a dispensing pump means of efiecting a true and complete separation of water from gasoline during dispensing of the gasoline, such means' being of a size capable of mounting within the usual or standard size of dispensing pump housing.

Still another object resides in the provision of improved means actuated by the rise or fall of the level of the accumulating separated water for electrically operating devices associated with the service station pump for apprising the operator of the existence of accumulated water and/or for stopping the gasoline pumping mechanism of the pump.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a view in elevation of a dispensing pump with the lower portion of the housing broken away for purposes of illustration.

Fig. 2 is a view inelevation showing the internal mechanism of the dispensing pump, the housing being entirely removed.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section taken on the lines 3-3 of Fig.1.

Fig. 4 is a view in longitudinal section through a separator constructed in accordance with the invention Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical section taken.

Fig. 9 is a schematic diagram of an electrical 1 circuit for controlling the automatic discharge of water from the liguidseparator.

As shown in the drawings, a gasoline dispensing pump embodying the invention comprises 9.

Another object of applicants invention is 'to housing 2 in which there is mounted an electric motor 4 driving a runnp 6 in a dispensing flow line, the outlet side of the pump being connected draulically connected to the underground tank 28 by a pipe 22 having at its lower end adjacent the bottom of the underground tank 28 the usual non-return foot valve -24. A separator 26 is connected to the upper end of the pipe 22, the outlet of the separator being in turn connected to the inlet of a fllter 28 directly connected to the intake of the pump 6.

The meter I8, through a conventional computer mechanism 38, operates the usual register 32 which is visible through windows such as 34 in opposite sides of the housing 2. The master switch for the motor 4 may be controlled in the customary manner by the lever 36, upon which the nozzle I8 is hung when not in use.

The housing 2 is of standard size and the space therein which can be allotted to the water separator is necessarily restricted. Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate this fact and show graphically how a water separator made in accordance with the present invention makes it possible to provide means of such restricted overall dimensions to effect a true and complete separationof water and the accompanying corrosion product from the gasoline during its continuous flow from the underground reservoir through the dispensing line and out of the dispensing nozzle.

The separator 28 preferably comprises a base casting 38, a. housing or casing 48 for-a separating chamber 42, a pan or casing 44 for a collecting chamber 46, and a cover or casing 48 for a control chamber 58. The separating chamber 42 is of a capacity of substantially 264 cubic inches in an actual installation, and complete separation is effected in this chamber. v

The base casting 88 is formed to provide an upper opening-52, defined by an annular rim or flange 54, and a lower opening 58 oifset from the opening 52 and defined by an annular rim or flange 58. The flange 88 is connected to the flange 54 by an upper wall portion 68 forming a base for the control chamber 58 and a lower wall portion 62 which is inclined to facilitate the flow of water and sedimentary matter into the collecting chamber--46. The pan or casing 44 is detachably fastened to casting 38 for removal when desired, by means of bolts 63.

The housing 44 is substantially of rounded,

' ovate, box-like configuration to prevent damage thereto if the water therein becomes frozen, for as the ice forms the pitch of the walls raises the ice up to an area of larger horizontal cross section, permitting the necessary space required for the expansion of the water as it freezes.

The housing is provided at its open side with an outwardly turned flange 64 which is clamped to the annular rim 54 of the base casting 38 by a clamping ring 66 and bolts 68 passing through the clamping ring and threadedly received in the annular rim 54. The housing 48 encloses, in addition to the separating chamber 42, an inlet 'chamber- 18 and an outlet chamber I2, the inlet chamber 18 being formed by a plate 14 secured to the top wall 16 of the housing, extending between the side Walls and spaced inwardly of the end wall 18 a distance such that the mixture of gasoline, water'and particles of corrosion product entering at the housing from the pipe 22 will not be churned nor will eddy currents be set up in the entering stream.

The outlet chamber 12 is formed by a plate 88 having a very small angle of inclination relative to the horizontal, the plate 88 extending between the side walls of the housing 48 and from the .plate 14 to a point spaced from the end wall-{'82 a distance such that no churning of the gasoline thereby will occur as it enters this outlet chamber from the separating chamber 42. The plate 14- .is sealed to the walls of the housing 48 above the plate 88, to prevent any liquid and sediment from passing to the outlet pipe 84 directly from the receiving chamber I8, by means of a sealing gasket or strip 88 secured in position by a clamping channel strip 88 welded or otherwise fastened to the outer face of the plate 14. A

The plate 14 terminates at its lower end a predetermined distance from the open bottom side of the housing 48, the distance being predetermined by the rate of flow of the gasoline through the dispensing line so that the mixture of liquids and particles of corrosion product will be fed to the separating chamber 42 in a substantially horizontal sheet or stream at the proper velocity. On its outer face toward the supply pipe 22, the plate 14 is provided with a sharply inclined member or channel 98 secured thereto as by welding of its flange 92 to the plate I4, the member 98 directing the incoming mixture of liquids and corrosion product downwardly of the inlet chamber I8 without causing any churning or foaming of the l quids.

The open bottom side of the housing 48 is partially closed by a plate 94 which is thereby interposed between the separating chamber and the collecting chamber and maintains the liquid in the latter in a quiescent state. Theplate 94 is securely fastened to the base 38 by means of screws 91 which are threaded into bosses extending upwardly from the floor of base 38. The plate 94 is provided with slots 98 extending transversely with respect to the direction of flow -of the liquids in the separating chamber 42, the slots 96 being defined by downwardly pressed flanges 98 and I88. The flanges 98, which extend in the direction of the flowing liquids, ar inclined from the horizontal at an angle which is smaller than the angle of inclination of the flanges I88, which extend oppositely to the direction of flow of the liquids. The flanges 98 and I88 cooperate to direct drops of Water, which are heavier than the gasoline, and the particles of corrosion product held in or carried by the drops of water, into the collecting chamber 46 and prevent return of the same into the separating chamber. The inclinations of the flanges 98 and I88 are such that the drops of water and particles of corrosion product or slime associated :with the drops-are allowed to flow or drip into the collecting chamber without substantial agitation such aswould cause an emulsiflcation of the water and particles with the gasoline.

The plate 94 is additionally provided with a plurality of relatively short, upstanding strips which are preferably L-shaped and secured to of the water from the gasoline.

readily mounted .in, and

aasarrl water and particlesdirected onto the flanges IIIII by the flanges 98.

Applicant has discovered that globules of water of the size that are normally drawn through the suctionpipe of a dispensing pump will separate by force of gravity through gasoline at a rate of substantially eight feet per minute. The rate of flow of gasoline through a one-inch pipe at the usual maximum rate of delivery of fifteen gallons per minute is 330 feet per minute and through a one and one-half inch pipe at the same usual maximum rate of delivery the velocity of the gasoline is about 163.8 feet per minute.

Applicant has further discovered that in order to effect a true and complete separation of the water and sedimentary matter from the gasoline, it is essential that the flow of the mixed liquids be substantially uniform throughout the separator chamber and that this rate of flow be at all times less than the rate of downward separation If the rate of in all parts of "channels will flow be not maintained uniform the separating chamber, liquid be formed in which the water will with the gasoline without separation therefrom. Also eddy currents" will be produced resulting in a re-entraining' or emulsiflcation of the water with the gasoline. The maximum rate of flow of the gasoline is fifteen gallons per minute through the dispensing line; the maximum uniform rate of upward flow of liquid in the separating chambe carried alongbar should not exceed substantially five feet per minute, thereby allowing the water to separate out at the differential velocity rate of three feet per minute, which differential rate of flow applicant'has discovered suffices to effect a true and complet separation of the water and the particles of slime from the gasoline during its continuous flow through th dispensing line.

Applicant therefore provides in the separating compartment 42 of the housing 40 a plurality of plates I04 to I I2spaced from each other, from and 80, from the end wall 82 of the housing 40, and from the plate 94 to form passages for directing the mixed gasoline and water upwardly and toward the outlet chamber I2 from. the horizontally directed sheet or stream of mixed liquids flowing into the bottom of the separating chamber between the lower edge of the plate I4 and the surface of the plate 94.

The plates or baffles I04 to H2 must be so disposed within the separator chamber 42 as to insure at this zone this uniform rate of upward flow of the mixed gasoline and water therein. -If this be done, the separator 26 may be made of the size shown in Fig. 3, which is such that it can be enclosed by. a pump housing 2 of normal, standard size and still effect a true and complete separation of the water and particles of iron oxide from the gasoline.

will separate from gasoline.

In order .to accomplish this the plates or baffles I I04 to H2 should be inclined to the vertical at angles which progressively increase in the direction of flow of the liquid from the inlet to the outlet of the separator. In the structure illustrated, the battle I04 is preferably inclined to the vertical at an angle of 20 degrees: the battle I06 at an angle of 28 degrees; the baffle I08 at an angle of 36 degrees; the baflle I III at an angle. of 47 degrees. and the bafile II! at an angle of 72 degrees.

Each of the baffles I04 to I 08 in this illustrated structure is preferably of substantially three inches in face width in the-vertical direction,

II2 each has preferably one-half inches.

while the baiiies III) and a face width of two and In order further to rate of flow of liquid in the separating compartment, the baflle plates I04 to III] are spaced at their lower edges from the surface of the plate 94 distances which progressively decrease in the direction of the horizontally flowing stream so that the channel or passage for this horizontal stream will uniformly decrease in width as more and more of the stream is diverted upwardly between the baffles. In the specific structure illustrated, the lower edge of the baffle I04 was spaced one and a quarter inches from the surfaces of the plate 94; the lower edge of the baffle I06 was spaced one and an eighth inches from said plate; the lower edge of thebaille I08 was spaced one inch from the plate 94 and the lower edge of the baffle IIII was spaced seven-eighths of an inch from the plate 94. The bafile plate IIZ is'so positioned as to further insure that the velocity of the liquid flowing upwardly between the baflles I03 and III] is uniform with respect to the rate of liquid flowing upwardly between the baffles I04 and I06, and I06 and I08. The baffle H2 is so positioned as to cooperate with the plate to allow the stream of their lower edges from the end wall 82 of the housing 40 that the velocity of the liquid flowing upwardly at this end of the housing will be uni form with respect to the velocity of the upflowing liquid in all other parts of the separating compartment 42. Any water or particles of corrosion product carried from the gasoline by the water as it separates at this point will collect and gravitate downwardly along the end wall 82.

In operation, as the liquid is continuously sucked from. the underground tank 20 through the separator 26 and the fi1ter'28 and is then continuously forced through the meter and through the dispensing nozzle at a continuous rate greatly'inexcess of the rate at which water As the suckedliquid passes from the pipe 22 into the receiving chain-- ber "Ill the flow is considerably decelerated and the liquid is spreaddue to the baifies I4 and out laterally and caused to travel in a horizontal direction across the entire sive with the cross sectional area thereof, and

during this horizontal flow it is graduallydesingle stream flowing outlet of the separator at the dis- ,pensing rate, which rate is substantlally equal to the rate at which the gasoline and entrained underground tank.

The globules of water the gasoline .carry with the slimy matter which insure uniformity in the,

separated gasoline to flow into the outlet chamber 72 without causing any downwardly and pass 4 94 and into the offset collecting chamber 46 in surfaces of the globules. As the globules form drops, the particles of slime accumulate thereon and are carried downwardly through the separating chamber and along the baiiles.

The separated water and particles of slime, held in the water by the surface tension .or attraction of the water drops, continue their flow through the slotted plate which the slime of hydrated iron oxide stratifies upon the upper surface of the water. Of course in the normal operation of the device gasoline also flows through the plate 84 into the collecting chamber 46, filling this chamber and the base 38 as well as the housing 40. The drops of water with the oxide particles carried by or enveloping the drops of water flow downwardly through this gasoline in the collecting chamber and the base 38 and as they accumulate cause the lower level .or line of separation of the water and. gasoline to rise and the stratified layer of hydrated iron oxide or slime which floats upon the water separates the body of accumulated water from the gasoline.

The collecting chamber 46 is provided with a drain outlet II4 closed by a manually removable plug II6, the drain outlet II4 being located at the lowermost portion of the bottom wall II8 of the pan or casing 44. The bottom wall II8 for this purpose slopes from the side walls downwardly toward the drain outlet I I4. When the plug H6 is removed, the water flows out of the collecting chamber and carries with it the collected slime of hydrated iron oxide.

Automatically operated means are provided for indicating the level of the water in the collecting chamber 46 and cooperating automatically operating means are provided for disabling the pump driving motor 4 when the water in this collecting chamber is above a predetermined level. These means preferably comprise a pair of electric control members or electrode devices I20 and I22 which are mounted within the control compart ment 50 formed by the housing 48 and the upper wall portion 60 of the base casting 38.

The electrode devices I20 and I22 each preferably comprise a member received in a threaded opening in the upper wall portion 60 and carrying on its center electrode a downwardlyextending frustoconical member I24 or I26, preferably formed of copper plated with silver. The member I24 is longer than the member I26 and thereconnected by a wire I42 which extends into the explosion proof switch housing I36 and is con- I nected to the ungrounded power wire I44 of the lighting circuit. The other, and grounded side, wire I46 of the lighting circuit power supply is connected to the shell of the separator 26 as by a wire I48 extending from the switch housing I36 through the pipe I34 and into the control chamber 50 where it is connected to the upper wall portion 60 of the base casting '38.

It will be evident from this description that as the level of water rises in the collecting chamber 46 the voltage impressed across the signal device or lamp I30 will increase due to the shape of the electrode member I24 and due to the decrease in electrical resistance between this electrode member and the bottom III of the pan 44. The brilliance of the warning given by the signal lamp I30 will therefore vary proportionally to the level of the water in the collecting chamber 46.

The electrical control member I22 controls the de-energization of the pump driving motor. For

. this purpose the electrode of the member I22 is fore extends to a lower point in the collecting The electrode of the member I20, which electrode carries the water-contacting member I24, is connected to a signal device or lamp I30 by I28 extenda wire I32 (Fig. 8) extending through a pipe I34 (Figs. 1 and 2) from the control housing 48 and through the explosion proof switch housing I36 to the lamp I30 carried upon the supporting bracket I38 so positioned within the housing that the lamp I30 may be viewed through a window I46 (Fig. 1) in the side of the housing 2. The window I is preferably located adjacent the nozzle support lever 36 so that the attendant can not help but see the lamp when he places or removes the nozzle. The lamp I30 is preferably of any wellknown type which increases in brilliance in accordance with the voltage impressed across its terminals. The wire I32 is connected to one terminal of the lamp I30; the, other terminal is connected by a wire I50 to the terminal I52 of a terminal block I54 in the explosion proof switch housing I36. The terminal I52 is in turn connected to one side of a solenoid I56 in the housing I36, the other side of the solenoid being connected to a terminal I58 connected by the wire I60 to the ungrounded wire I44 of the power supply.

The solenoid I56, through its core I62 and a switch lever I64, controls a mercury switch I66. The contacts of the mercury switch I66 are connected to terminals I68 and I10, the terminal I10 being connected to the wire I12 of the motor supply power line and the terminal I68 being connected by a wire I14 in series with the master motor switch I16, which in turn is connected to the other wire I18 of the motor power supply. The master motor switch I16 is controlled in the as previously described. It will be evident that the master switch I16 and the mercury switch I66 being closed, the pump motor will be energized to drive the pump and effect a dispensing of the gasoline when the nozzle valve I8 is opened.

It the service station attendant ignore the warning signal given by the signal device or lamp 30 and if he permit the water to rise to such a level as to contact the electrode member I26, suflicient current will flow from the power wire I44, through the solenoid I56, the wire I50, and through the electrode member I26 to the grounded supply wire I46 by the wire I48. Energization of this solenoid movement of its core I62, which, through the switch lever I64, will rotate the mercury switch I66 in a clockwise direction, thereby breaking the motor circuit and preventing further dispensing of gasoline until the water has been drained from the collecting chamber 46.

The usual dial illuminating lamps I (Figs. 2 and 8) may be connected by wires I82 extending through pipes I84 and switch housing I86, to the lighting circuit supply wires I44 and I46. The housing I86 encloses the usual manually operated light control switch I88 interposed in one of the wires I82.

If it be desired to automatically drain the water and slime from the collecting chamber 46, when a predetermined amount of water accumulates therein, the circuit shown in Fig. 9 may beprovided. In this form of the invention the will cause an upward aeearrr drain outlet itt may be controlled by a valve I92 carried by a valve rod lat slidably mounted in an upper wall portion iiit of the base casting 38, a suitable, packing means its being provided for the valve rod iil l. A spring iliiil, encircling the valve rod i9 3 and interposed between the upper wall portion tilt and a collar tilt carried on the rod 695, normally urges the valve it? into closed position with respect to the drain outlet i383.

The electrical control member it i has its elec trode 206, which projects into the collecting.

chamber it, connected by a wire iillil to a solenoid till which receives the upper end of the valve rod Hi l. The solenoid is in turn connected by a wire Bid to the ungrounded wire 2M1 of a motor power supply line in parallel to the pump driving motor. The other wire tilt of, the motor power supply line is grounded, as is also the shell of the separator, as by a wire flit.

It will be evident from this description that as the water level rises, the electrical control member 2M permits a suiiicient current to pass through the solenoid to effect a lifting of the valve rod i9 3 and the valve tilt, thereby allowing the accumulated water to drain by gravity from the separating chamber iii.

If desired the solenoid tit may be the con-- ventional fast operating, slow releasing type, or it may be controlled by a conventional fast operating, slow releasing relay in the electrode circuit, and having its contacts in a separate sole= noid circuit, thereby permitting the valve tilt to remain open a predetermined time after it has been raised by the solenoid 2ND. Alternatively, the solenoid may operate conventional timing contacts connected in parallel to the control member 204, and which retain the solenoid energized for a predetermined time to hold the drain valve open for such predetermined time. In addition a dash pot could be employed to prevent quick closing of the valve iti.

The filter 28, which is inserted between the separator 26 and the suction side of the pump ii, preferably comprises (as shown in Figs. 6 and 7) a central casting till and removable end walls or cover plates 222 and 2ilii. The outlet pipe M of the separator 23 is directly connected to the intake 226 of the filter 283 as by the union or coupling 228. The filter 28 provides a longitudinally extending channel @319 for permitting the incoming stream of' gasoline, with any fine particles or dirt which might be contained therein, to spread out over the surface of a substantially horizontal, flat screen 232 secured to bars 23% extending between end plates 235 and pinned. or otherwise fastened, to the opposite side walls of the central section 220 of the filter housing.-

The screen 232 is preferably releasably clamped to these bars 234 as by resilient clips 236 frictionally bound to the bars ,234 and provided with generally U-shaped portions 238 between the legs of which the screen 232 is clamped by means of a clamping strip 240. The screen 232 extends from side to side and from end to 'end of the filter housing andv all gasoline which passes into the pump must pass through this screen, this screen. preferably being of the order of sixteen mesh per inch.

Above the screen232 the filter is provided with a screen 242 extending from side to side of the filter housing and from cover plate to cover plate ind being arranged in a plurality of folds about ;paced pins or bars 244. The spaced pins or bars t lt extend between the end plates tilt to which they are secured as by screws 2:36. The oppo= site free edges of the screen are secured to the bars 2% by the clips 2% which, at their upper ends, are provided with substantially U- shapedchannels or claniping portions tilt to receive the edges of the screen it? and a clamping strip 250. The screen tilt is preferably a fine screen of the order of sixty mesh to the inch,

The screen tilt being arranged in folds makes it possible to provide a very large screening area within a very small space and insures that the very fine particles of dust which are borne by the gasoline are separated out as the gasoline flows upwardly along the inclined surfaces there oi It will be apparent from the foregoing description that applicant has provided a method and apparatus for dispensing gasoline after hav. ing separated out water and sedimentary matter.

This application is a continuation-impart of my prior application, Serial No. 226,752, filed August 25, 1938.

The invention is heteby claimed as follows:

i. in a gasoline dispensing device, means forming a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing line connected to said source oi supply, a pump for causing gasoline to flow from said source of supply through said dispensing line, means operative during such flow for slowing down the gasoline in a portion oi said dis- 'pensing line toa rate of flow at which water in said gasoline will separate from the gasoline by gravity, whereby water separates from the gasoline as it flows through said portion of the dispensing line, means for collecting the separated water from said portion of he dispensing line,

means including a first el "mode operatively associated with said coilecting means and controlled by the separated water for indicating the presence of water in said collecting means, an electric motor for actuating the pump, a second electrode operatively associated with the collect ins means and the electric motor and controlled by theseparated water for disabling said electric motor when a predetermined amount of water collects in said collecting means, the first electrode extending to a lower level in said collecting means than the second electrode where== by as the water accumulates in the collecting means and reaches the first electrode an indication thereof will first be given and/thereafter the electric motor wil be subsequently disabled upon the water reaching the second electrode.

,down the gasoline in said separator to a rate of forming a separating -line connected greatly accumulates in said collector, said electrically operable means comprising electrode means providing an electrode extending into the quiescent body of water in the collector for engaging the water when the same accumulates to a predetermined amount.

3. In a gasoline dispensing pump, a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing line connected to said source of supply, means for drawing gasoline from said source of supply and for forcing it through said dispensing line, means chamber in said line in advance of the forcing means and including baille means operative during slowing down the rate of flow of the gasoline in said separating chamber to a rate of flow which is less than the rate at which water in said gasoline will separate from the gasoline by gravity, thereby allowing such water to separate from the flowing gasoline in said portion of the dispensing line, means forming a collecting chamber below said settling chamber in which gasoline and the separated water accumulate and stratify, and means between said collecting chamber and said separating chamber for preventing agitation of the body of gasoline and water in the collecting chamber by the gasoline flowing through said portion of the dispensing line.

4. A method for dispensing gasoline from a source of gasoline supply through a dispensing line, said method consisting in forcing the gasoline from said source through said line in a con-- tinuous stream at an original rate which is in excess of the rate at which water entrained in the gasoline will separate therefrom, retarding the flow of gasoline and entrained water'in an unscreened portion of said dispensing line as the gasoline with entrained water flows therethrough to a second, lower rate at which the water entrained in said gasoline separates by gravity from the continuously flowing gasoline, accelerating the flow of the gasoline after the water is separated from the gasoline in such portion of the line to its original rate, and collecting the water as it separates in an area outside of the path of flow of the gasoline through said portion of the line.

5. In a gasoline dispensing pump, a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing to said source of supply, means for sucking the gasoline from said source of supply through a portion of said line, means forming a separating chamber interposed in a portion of said line through which the gasoline is sucked, a plurality of spaced baflies within said separating cha' ber and inclined to the horizontal at successively decreasing angles thereby to divert the stream of gasoline in said portion of the lineinto a multiplicity of streams flowing upwardly at a uniform rate or rise at which water entrained in the gasoline will separate from the gasoline thereby allowing such entrained water to separate from the flowing gasoline during the continuous flow of the gasoline through the dispensing line.

6.The herein described method of removing wax-like slimes present in gasoline and similar internal combustion engine liquid fuels, as such fuels are dispensed, comprising sucking the liquid fuel with water entrained therein in a continuous closed column at a rate of flow in excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from such fuel, while continuously and progressively decelerating the such flow for uniformly of fuel, and continuously removing liquid fuel and entrained water during a portion of such flow to a rate at which the entrained water separates by gravity from such fuel and in a manner to cause the fuel to flow uniformly throughout the entire cross sectional area of such flow at such decelerated speed, whereby to form-the entrained water into globules to cause the slimy wax-like matter in suspension in said fuel to adhere to said globules to cause said slime covered globules by gravity to move to the bottommost portion of such flowing column the globules of water with adhering slimy material from the zone of the flowing fuel.

7. The herein described method of continuously removing water from gasoline and similar liquid internal combustion engine fuel during dispensing, which comprises forcing gasoline or other liquid fuel with entrained water therein of the rate at which water separates by gravity a portion of the i column progressively decelerating the flow of from such fuel, while along the feul and entrained water uniformly throughout the entire cross sectional area of such portion of the column to a rate at which water separates by gravity from said fuel, whereby to cause entrained water to take the form of globules in such decelerated body of fuel and to move by gravity therethrough to .the bottom of said column, collecting such separated water and removing it from the zone of decelerated flow, and thereafter accelerating such liquid fuel, with the water separated therefrom, to its former rate of fiow in such closed column, all in a continuous manner.

8. A dispensing device for dispensing internal combustion engine motor fuel comprising,- in combination with a tank for holding a relatively large quantity of such fuel, means forming a dispensing line adapted for connection to said supply tank, a pump disposed in said line in said housing for sucking liquid fuel from the tank at a rate of flow greatly in excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from such fuel, said pump forcing such fuel under pressure through that portion of the dispensing line connected to the discharge side of said pump, and water separating mechanism disposed in that portion of said line connected to the'suction side of the pump, said mechanism including a chamber through which the fuel is sucked by said pump, said dispensing line from the tank to the pump being constructed and arranged to prevent the ingress of air thereto except such air as is entrained with the liquid sucked from the tank by the pump, said water separating chamber including angularly disposed baflie means for prom-essively decelerating the rate of flow of the fuel passing through said chamber to a rate at which the water separates by gravity from said fuel, and said baiiie means being disposed in relation to the chamber for causing such deceleration of the fuel to take place uniformly in said chamber throughout the entire cross sectional area thereof, said chamber and said baflie means being free of screens whereby to provide a series of open, angularly disposed liquid fuel passages devoid of obstructing screens whereby such passages cannot become clogged with slime or other wax-like. solids inherently present in the fuel passing therethrough, and whereby such deceleration of the fuel during path of flow of the gasoline dispensing continuously separates by gravity all water from the liquid being dispensed.

9. In a gasoline dispensing device, the combination of means forming a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing line connected' to said source of supply, pumping means disposed in said line for drawing gasoline and entrained water from the source of supply and forcing gasoline with entrained water through the dispensing line at a rate greatly in excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from such gasoline, means forming a water separating chamber disposed in the line on the suction side of the pumping means and means in said separating chamber operable during the dispensing flow for retarding the gasoline and entrained water and for causing the gasoline and entrained water to flow throughsaid chamber at a rate uniform throughout the cross sectional area of said chamber and at which water separates by gravity from the gasoline, whereby to permit the water automatically and continuously to form into globules and to flow by gravity to the bottom of said chamber, and water collecting means providing a separating chamber disposed below said separating chamber and in communication with the water separating chamber to collect the separated water out of the and entrained water in said separating chamber. 5

10. In a liquid dispensing device for dispensing internal combustion dispensing line having one end connected thereto and having a foot valve in said end, a pump in said line adapted to suck the fuel from said tank at a rate of flow greatly in excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from such fuel and for forcing the fuel through that portion of the line connected to the discharge side of said pump, a relatively fine mesh screen filter in that portion of the line on'the suction side of the pump-for removing relatively larger solids from the fuel, means in the dispensing line in advance of the mesh filter comprising a chamber relatively large in cross sectional area in comparison with the cross sectional area of the dispensing line, said chamber having baiiie means therein arranged to provide aseries of tortuous channels disposed to decelerate the liquid flowing between said baiiles in a uniform manner throughout the cross sectional area of said chamber to a rate less than the rate at which water separates by gravity from such fuel to cause entrainedwater in said fuel tio separate out by gravity in the form of water globules, and whereby the globules during their formation remove by capillary attraction the wax-like slimes in said fuel, and means associated with said chamber for collecting and isolating said globules of water and said wax-like slime whereby said fuel prior to reaching said filtering screen has had all water and said wax-like slimesremoved therefrom.

11. In a dispensing device for, dispensing internal combustion engine liquid motor fuel, in

combination with a supply tank for holding a relatively large quantity of such motor fuel containing water and wax-like slime in suspension therein, a dispensing line adapted for connection. to said tank, a pump disposed in said line forsucking liquid from the tank at a rate of fiow greatly in excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from such fuel and for forcing such fuel under pressure at such excess engine motor fuel, inv combination with a supply tank for holding a relatively large quantity of such motor fuel,'a

the pump, said separating rate of fiow'through that portion of the dispensing line connected with the discharge side of the pump, slime separating means disposed in said line on the suction side of the pump for removing such wax-like slime from the fuel and including a chamber sealed against the entrance of air and through which the fuel is sucked by chamber including walls forming unrestricted liquid flow channels therebetween and constructed and arranged to decelerate the rate of flow of the fuel and entrained water passing through the separating chamber to a rate substantially less than the rate at which water separates by gravity from such fueljthe walls of said channels providing downwardly inclined surfaces on which the water forms as globules entraining the slime suspended in said slowly flowing lecting said separated the path of flow of the fuel and entrained water in said separating chamber, and means for mainfuel, and means for coltaining the separated water and slime isolated.-

from the fuel as the fuel flows through said if channels.

12.111 a dispensing device for gasoline and other internal combustion engine fuel, the combination of means forming a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing line connected to said source of supply, pumping means disposed in said line for drawing gasoline from the source of supply and forcing it through the dispensing line at a rate of fiow greatly in excess the dispensing fiow for causing the gasoline to flow uniformly through said water separating chamber at a rate less than the rate at which water in said gasoline will separate by gravity therefrom, water collecting means disposed below said separating chamber and out of the path of flow of the gasoline as it fiows through said separating chamber and into which the separated water is adapted to collect, and an apertured partition disposed between said separating chamber and said water collecting means, said partition permitting collected water to pass therethrough andhaving means for preventing agitation of the collected 'water by the gasoline flowing through said separating means. said partition in-. cluding spaced apart upstanding bafiles on its upper surface lying in the path of flow of the gasoline as it flows into said separating means, said partition having reversely disposed flanges depending from its opposite side into said collecting means. a

13. In a device for' dispensing gasoline and similar internal combustion engine fuel, the combination of means forming a supply tank adapted to contain a relatively large quantity of said fuel,

' a dispensing line connected to said tank through which the fuel is adapted to be dispensed, a pump in said line adapted at a rate greatlyin excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from said fuel, a water separator in said. dispensing line in advance of said pump, said separator forming a more or less box-like chamber, with the inlet side of the line connected to one end of the upper portion of said chamber, said chamber having a vertically depending baflie disposed in spaced relation from.

water and slime out of r to draw fuel from said tank spaced from the lower the bottom wall of said chamber and directly opposite and spaced from said inlet pipe, there being means associated with said baflie for spreading the incoming liquid uniformly laterally of said bai'fle whereby to cause the liquid to flow downwardly and thence forwardly along the entir bottom portion of said chamber, the upper portion of said chamber having along its length a plurality of diagonally disposed imperforate baflles inclined in a direction such that their uppermost ends are' nearest to said first mentioned bafile, the upper ends of said baiiies being spaced from the upper wall of said casing at progressively increasing distances in a direction away from said inlet end, and the lower ends of said baflles being wall of said chamber at progressively decreasing distances from said inlet end, the spaces between said inclined baflies providing a plurality of liquid flow channels, the upper portion of said separator having a substantially horizontal partition terminating short of the end of the chamber opposite the inlet end,

the portion of said chamber above said partition having a discharge outlet connecting with the suction side of said pump; there being an additional baflle disposed at a slightly downward inclination to a horizontal plane, the lower end of the baflle lying substantially between the last of the vertical series of bafiles and the horizontally extend'ng partition, said separating chamber being p ovided on its bottommost portion with a foraminated plate, and means forming a collecting chamber beneath said foraminated plate adapted to receive the collected water, said foraminated plate having-a plurality of spaced apart, upstanding baiiles projecting into the separating chamber, and said foraminated plate having on its under side a plurality of spaced apart, oppositely extending depending flanges, the free ends of which lie adjacenteach other in overlapping relation.

14. In a device for dispensing gasoline and other internal combustion engine liquid fuels, the combination with a supply tank adapted to hold a relatively large quantity of such fuel, a dispensing line connected to said supply tank, a

- pump for drawing the liquid from said tank at a rate greatly in excess of the rate at which water separates by gravity from said liquid and for forcing such withdrawn liquid through a portion of the dispensing line, water separating means disposed in said dispensing 'line on the suction side of the pump, comprising a chamber having a cross sectional area of flow greatly in excess of the cross sectional area of the dispensing line, means associated with said chamber for directing the gasoline flowing thereinto so as to cause the same to flow in a horizontal direction across said cross-sectional area, such flow gradually decelerating to a rate at which water separates by gravity from such gasoline, the bottom of said chamber comprising a perforated partition, the perforations in said partition permitting globules of water separated out during the decelerated flow to pass therethrough, and means forming a chamber below said partition for receiving such separated water in a quiescent pool out of the path of flow of the gasoline through the separating chamber.

15. In a gasoline dispensing device, a source of gasoline supply, .a housing, means forming a dispensing flow line in said housing and connected to said source of disposed in said housing and connected in said line for causing the gasoline toflow from said source of supply through said line, and screenless flow control separating means disposedon the suction side of the pumping means, said separating means providing an enlarged chamber forming a portion of said dispensing line, and means in said chamber operative during such flow for causing the gasoline and entrained water to flow upwardly through said chamber at a rate which is less than the rate at which water in said gasoline will separate by gravity from the gasoline thereby substantially completely separating the water from the flowing gasoline during dispensing flow of the gasoline through said dispensing line.

16. In a service station pump, a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing line connected to said source of supply, means in said dispensing line for continuously drawing the gasoline from said source of supply and forcing it through said dispensing line at a rate of flow greatly in excess of the rate at which water separates from gasoline and screenless flow conarating .means-providing an enlarged chamber forming a portion of said line and means in said chamber operative during such continuous dispensing flow for slowing down the flow of the gasoline and entrained water through said chamber to a uniform continuous rate of flow per cross sectional area of said chamber not exceeding substantially five feet per minute, thereby allowing water to separate by gravity from the continuously flowing gasoline.

17. In a gasoline dispensing device, a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing flow line connected to said source of supply, a pump in said line for causing the gasoline to flow from said source of supply through said dispensing line, water separating means in said line between the pump and the source of supply, said water separating means including a housing, a baflle in said housing causing the gasoline to flow downwardly and spread out horizontally as it enters the housing, a baffle for causing the gasoline to flow substantially horizontally as it leaves the housing,

' said baflles forming a separating chamber and unscreened connections between said chamber and the inlet and outlet to the housing, said baffies extending between opposed side walls of the housing and terminating short of the bottom and end of the housing respectively to direct the gasoline horizontally across the chamber and then upwardly to flow out of the chamber, a collecting chamber beneath said separating chamber, and means between said collecting chamber and said separating chamber for preventing agitation of the water in the collecting chamber by the gasoline flowing through the separating chamber.

18. In a device for dispensing gasoline or other liquid internal combustion engine fuel, a source of liquid fuel supply, a dispensing line connected to said source, a pump for drawing the liquid fuel from said tank at a rate greatly in excess of the rate at whichwater separates by gravity from said liquid fuel, water separating means disposed in said dispensing line on the suction side of the chamber of cross-sectional area greatly in excess supply, pumping means of the cross-sectional area of the dispensing line, means associated with said chamber for directing the liquid fuel flowing into the chamber in a horizontal direction, means in said chamber-for gradually. decelerating the fuel and entrained water to a rate at which water separates by gravity from the liquid fuel, and means beneath said chamber for receiving from thechamber the separated water in a quiescent pool out of the path or flow of the liquid fuel through the sepawater will separate by gravity from gasoline,

and water separating means including an enlarged chamber, means in said chamber for directing the gasoline and entrained water in a horizontal direction and screenless means in said chamber for retarding the flow of gasoline and water through said chamber to a rate at which water in said gasoline separates by gravity from the gasoline, thereby separating the water from the flowing gasoline during the dispensing flow of the gasoline through said dispensing line.

20. A method for dispensing gasoline from a source of gasoline supply through a dispensing line, said method consisting in drawing the gasoline with entrained water from said source through said line in a continuous stream at an original rate greatly in excess of the rate at which water entrained in the gasoline will separate therefrom, retarding the flow of gasoline and entrained water in an unscreened portion of said dispensing line as it flows therethrough to a second lower rate at which the water entrained in said gasoline separates as l les f om the tinuously flowing gasoline, utilizing the globules of water to hold by reason of their surface tension particles of slime contained in the gasoline thereby to separate such particles from the gasoline as it flows through said unscreened portion of said dispensing line, and accelerating the flow of the gasoline after the water and slime are separated from the gasoline to itsoriginal rate.

21. In a gasoline dispensing device, a source of gasoline supply, means forming a dispensing line connected to said source of supply, a pump in said line for sucking the gasoline from said source and forcing it through said line, a water separator in said dispensing line on the suction side of the pump, said separator having means forming an enlarged chamber, means for directing the gasoline and entrained water in a horizontal direction through the chamber, and means in said chamber for retarding the gasoline and wateras they flow in the chamber to a rate at which water separates by gravity from the gasoline, means below said chamber and in constant communication therewith for receiving from the chamber the separated water in a pool out'of the path of flow of the gasoline through said chamber and means for preventing agitation of the water in the receiving means by the gasoline flowing through the separator chamber.

22. In a gasoline dispensing device, a tank forming a source of gasoline supply, a dispensing line connected to said source of supply, pumping means in said line above said source for causing said gasoline to flow from said source of supply through-said dispensing line at a rate which is greatly in excess of the rate at which water entrained in the gasoline will separate by gravity from the gasoline, means providing a water separating chamber in said line and having an outlet connected to the suction side of the pumping means above an inlet connected to the source, andbaille means in said chamber for uniformly dividing the gasoline and entrained water flowing through the chamber into a multiplicity of streams flowing upwardly at a uniform rate at which water in said gasoline separates from the gasoline by gravity, thereby to remove the water from the gasoline during its continuous flow through the chamber.

23. A method for dispensing gasoline or other internal combustion engine fuel from a source of supply through a dispensing line. said method consisting in sucking the gasoline with entrained water from said source through a portion of said line and forcing the gasoline through another portion of said line in a continuous stream and at a rate which i greatly in excess of the rate at which water entrained in the gasoline will separate therefrom by gravity while retarding the flow of the gasoline and entrained water in a part of that portion of the dispensing line through which the gasoline and entrained water is sucked and to a rate of flow at which water in said gasoline separates from the gasoline by gravity.

CHESTER, C. OBERLY.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION. Patent No. 2,259,771. I October 21, 19in.

. v I CHESTER c. OBERLY. It is hereby'- certified that error appears in the printed specification .ef the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 14., sec- 0nd column, line 51, for the reference numeral "50" read --l50--; page 5, second coiumn', line 55, claiml, for "W1 1 reed --wi1l--; page 6, first col umn, line 61, c1aim'5, for the word "or" read --of-'-; page 7, first column, line 56 ,-Iciaim 10,.for "tio" read -to--; page 9, first column, line 11, claim 19, for "in which" read "at which"; and that the said Letters Patent should beread with this correction therein that the same may cdnfom to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 2nd day ofDecember, A. D. 1911.1.

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) 7 Acting cemmissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2463703 *Aug 31, 1945Mar 8, 1949Lester G LeglerWater detector for fuel systems
US2598957 *Feb 7, 1949Jun 3, 1952Dayton Pump And Mfg CompanyPanel arrangement for dispensing pumps
US2680538 *May 7, 1951Jun 8, 1954Erie Meter Systems IncGasoline service station pump with gas and water separator
US2708945 *Nov 15, 1951May 24, 1955Worthington CorpLiquid level control circuit
US2857081 *Feb 9, 1953Oct 21, 1958Tait Mfg Co TheGas separating and pumping devices
US2944670 *Feb 20, 1958Jul 12, 1960Thompson Brothers Bilston LtdMeans for accelerating the separation of water and solid impurities from liquid fuel for aircraft
US3171570 *Oct 16, 1961Mar 2, 1965Reed Willis EDispenser
US4576553 *Dec 23, 1983Mar 18, 1986Black & Decker Inc.Painting applicator with remote supply
EP0481219A2 *Sep 13, 1991Apr 22, 1992Karl Küfner KgConnection piece
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/1, 222/62, 210/261, 315/291, 210/305, 222/40, 210/112, 210/143, 222/23, 210/533, 417/9, 210/447, 210/318
International ClassificationF16L55/24, B67D7/76
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/766, F16L2101/30, F16L55/24
European ClassificationF16L55/24, B67D7/76C