Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2260138 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1941
Filing dateMar 21, 1940
Priority dateMar 21, 1940
Publication numberUS 2260138 A, US 2260138A, US-A-2260138, US2260138 A, US2260138A
InventorsFeinberg Elliott H
Original AssigneeFeinberg Elliott H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf shoe
US 2260138 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 21, 1941. FEINBERG 2,260,138

GOLF SHOE Filed March 21, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jig. 2.

ELL/UTT H. -F'/:/N&ER5

' INVENTOR ATTO R N EY Oct. 21, 1941. E. H. FEINBERG 2,250,138

GOLF SHOE Filed March 21, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ELL, m T T' H FE/NEIERE' INVENTOR ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 21. 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GOLF SHOE Elliott H. Feinberg, New York, N. Y.

Application March 21, 1940, Serial No. 325,217

. 7 Claims.

This invention relates generally to footwear and more particularly to sport shoes having spikes or cleats on the soles and heels and the combination therewith of an overshoe of novel construction.

Among the objects of the present invention is the provision of a combination shoe and overshoe which permits of adequate spike or cleat action whether or not the overshoe is being worn.

It is well known that many sports require the use of shoes by the player which will enable him to get a good stance or grip on the ground, this is particularly true of the game of golf. When playing golf, frequently the grounds are wet, as for example during the early morning when dew is prevalent, or during or after rain. When ordlnary golf shoes, usually composed of leather, are worn during such playing conditions, the shoes become impregnated with water and are then uncomfortable and unhealthful. While practically allplayers prefer to use spiked shoes, under damp and muddy ground conditions, they are forced to abandon their spiked shoes and to use ordinary unspiked shoes with well known rubbers or overshoes. In doing so the advantage of having a good grip on the ground is lost, and other disadvantages also arise. For example when heavy dew is encountered when playing early in the morning, it is necessary to wear overshoes. Later in the morning the sun comes out and dries the dew, it is then very desirable to wear spiked shoes. The dew may dry when the player is far from the clubhouse, and it is necessary to return to the clubhouse and change shoes or to carry an extra pair of shoes along, an annoying burden.

In accordance with the present invention, the player may start out on the course early in the morning while the ground is very wet with dew. He wears a combination shoe and overshoe which allows the spikes to project downwardly through the overshoe and to properly grip the ground. Later in the day when the ground is dried by the sun, he need only remove the light weight overshoes, place them in his golf bag, and continue playing in his regular spike shoes which are dry and comfortable.

Another object of the present invention lies in the provision of an overshoe having the above described advantages yet which may be readily adapted for use with golf shoes of known spiked construction and presently in use. This means that the golfer may either purchase an outfit of spiked shoes and overshoes designed to be used therewith, or if he already has spiked shoes he advantages will more fully appear in the progress of this disclosure and be pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings forming a material part of this disclosure, corresponding parts are designated by similar reference characters throughout the difierent views of each embodiment.

Figure l is a view in perspective showing a first embodiment of the invention. In this view the shoe is shown as inserted within the overshoe.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of Figure 1, but

' taken from a higher position.

Figure 3 is an enlarged bottom plan view of the overshoe seen in Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a schematic sectional view of Figure 3 as seen from the plane 44 thereon.

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view partly in elevation as seen from the plane 5-5 on Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a view taken similarly to Figure 2 but shows a second embodiment of the invention. I

Figure 7 is a view taken similarly to Figure 5, but shows a second embodiment of the invention.

Figure 8 is a view taken similarly to Figure 1 but shows a third embodiment of the invention.

Figure 9 is taken similarly to Figures 5 and 7 but shows a third embodiment of the invention.

Turning now to the first embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figures 1 to 5 inclusive, the combination spiked golf shoe and overshoe is generally indicated by numeral Ill.

The golf shoe Il may be of any desired construction well known in the'art, so that a detailed description thereof is not deemed necessary. The bottom portion of the shoe II is provided with a plurality of spikes l2. The spikes i2 may either be permanently attached to the sole I3 of the shoe, and the heel, or the spikes I2 may be detachably attached to the sole and heel in any suitable manner known in the prior art. One

manner is illustrated in the drawings and seen in detail in Figure 5, in which the sole I3 is provided with an internally threaded sleeve l4, covered by an insole IS. The spike l2 includes a frusto-conical point l6, an annular flange l1, and a threaded shank Hi. The flange l'l includes indentations I9 and 20 which may be engaged by a tool having a similar configuration for the purpose of screwing in or screwing out the spike. The spikes l2 are arranged over the bottom portions of the shoe H in any desirable configuration or arrangement, several standard patterns have been adopted and are now in use by the large sport shoe manufacturers.

The overshoe 2| may be of any known and acceptable basic construction. Since, when in use a considerable amount of the wear is taken by the spike points I6, it is. desirable that. the overshoe be of relatively thin construction. This permits ample downward projection of the spike points l5, and also reduces the overall weight of the overshoe, which is an advantage, since the overshoe is principally employed for auxiliary service. The overshoe 2! may be of all gum or rubber construction orit may be made of laminations of rubber and textile material.

The lower portions of the overshoe, namely the sole portion 22 and the heel portion 23 are provided with a plurality of orifices 24. The orifices 24 may be merely punched out apertures in the sole portion 22 and the heel portion 23, but then a much more satisfactory device results when the orifices 24 have the overshoe portions bordering the same provided with reinforcem'ents 25 and 26, which may be in the form of eyelets, or small grommets and rings, or tubular rivets as shown. As seen in Figures 4 and the reinforcement 25 includes a cylindrical portion 21, and upper and lower peripheral flanges 28 and 29 respectively. The diameter of the inside of the cylindrical portion 21 is such that the point I6 may pass freely therethrough, while the flange 28 may engage the flange ll. As seen in Figure 5, the point is extends below or outwardly of the flange 29 a distance suflicient to properly engage the ground when the combined shoe and overshoe are worn. 1 The vamp portion 30 of the overshoe 2| is provided with a known slide fastening device 3| which when opened facilitates the engagement and disengagement of the overshoe 2| with the shoe ll, since certain lateral movement of the overshoe in this operation is desirable, and the lateral movement is not possible until the reinforcements are disengaged from the spike points. The reinforcements 25 and 26 may be of metal,

or any other suitable material.

In the second embodiment of the invention, illustrated'in Figures 6 and 7, parts corresponding to the first embodiment are given corresponding reference characters with the addition of prime marks.

Principal differences over the, first embodiment lie in vamp construction and the engagement of the oriflced portions of the sole and heel of the overshoe with the spike points which are of a different construction. l

The vamp portion 30' has an open area indicated by numeral32, which is bridged by an adjustable snap fastening strap 33.

The point I6 is provided with an annular groove 34, which is therefore of reduced diameter with relation to the normal spike constructtion. The orifices 24' have the edges thereof provided with reinforcements 25' which are of a resilient nature. Where the overshoe 2| is composed of rubber, the reinforcements 25 may be an integral rubber bead, rib, or rim, as shown in Figure '7. Where desired, however, the rein-' forcement 25' may be made of metal in a spring form, or may be a metal eyelet of resilient construction. When the overshoe 2| is put on, the points I6 are pushed into the reinforcements 25' which are expanded by the cone shape of the point "5, but which contract into the groove 34 providing a. snap action and promoting a watertight joint thereat.

In the third embodiment of the invention, illustrated in Figures 8 and 9, parts corresponding to the first embodiment are given corresponding reference characters with the addition of double prime marks.

Principal differences over the first embodiment and second embodiment lie in the vamp construction, the omission of the heel, and the use of a heel strap on the overshoe. Also the method of fastening the overshoe to the shoe by means of the spikes.

The orifices 24" are provided with reinforcements 25". The shank I8" is lengthened sothat the shank I 8" is passed through the reinforcement 25" as contrasted with the other embodiments in which the point is passed through the reinforcements. When the spike is screwed into place, the overshoe sole portion 22" is com-' pressed between the shoe sole portion l3" and the flange ll". This means that the overshoe is held onto the shoe by the spikes, together with the heel strap 40, which may or may not be required.

It may thus be seen that I have disclosed a novel combination golf shoe and overshoe which has a high degree of utility since the spikes are effective whether or not the overshoe is Worn.

While the invention finds good utilization in golf shoes, obviously it may be used in other ways with equal effectiveness. Examples of this are shoes for all kinds of sports, hiking, shoes for walking on ice or other slippery surfaces, where the protection of an overshoe is desired.

I wish it to be understood that I do not desire to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, for obvious modifications ,will occur to a person skilled in the art.

I claim: 1. The combination with a shoe having aplurality of spikes projecting therefrom, the downwardly projecting portions of said spikes being of a certain length; of an overshoe disengageably engageable with said shoe, said overshoe having a lower portion of a thickness substantially less than the length of said spikes, the said lower portion of the overshoe having a plurality of orifices disposed therein, the orifices permitting penetration therethrough and projection therebe-- low of the said spikes, whereby the shoe is protected by the overshoe and the spikes may grip a surface which the shoe and overshoe overlie.

2. A golf overshoe. for shoes having spikes, comprising: a sole portion having a plurality of orifices therein through which the spikes penetrate and project downwardly below the lowermost sur-' face of said sole portion, the thickness of the sole portion being substantially less than the length of the spikes. l 1 3. The combination with a shoe having a plurality of spikes projecting therefrom, the downwardly projecting portions of said spikes being of a certain length; of an overshoe disengageably engageable with said shoe, said overshoe having a lower portion of a thickness substantially less than the length of said spikes, the said lower portion of the overshoe having a'plurality of reinforcing means associated with the edges of the overshoe bordering said orifices, the reinforcing means permitting penetration therethrough and projection therebelow of the said spikes, whereby the shoe is protected by the overshoe and the spikes may grip a surface which the shoe and overshoe overlie.

4. The combination with a shoe having a plurality of spikes projecting therefrom, the downwardly projecting portions of said spikes being of a certain length; of an overshoe disengageably engageable with said shoe, said overshoe having a lower portion of a thickness substantially less than the length of said spikes, the said lower portion of the overshoe having a plurality of reinforcing means including a thickened annular rim associated with the edges of the overshoe bordering said orifices, the reinforcing means permitting penetration therethrough and projection therebelow of the said spikes, whereby the shoe is protected by the overshoe and the spikes may grip a surface which the shoe and overshoe overlie.

5. The combination with a shoe having a plurality of spikes projecting therefrom, the downwardly projecting portions of said spikes being of a certain length; of an overshoe disengageably engageable with said shoe, said overshoe having a lower portion of a thickness substantially less than the length of said spikes, the said lower portion of the overshoe having a plurality-of reinIorcing means including an eyelet, associated with the edges of the overshoe bordering said oriflees, the reinforcing means permitting penetration therethrough and projection therebelow of the said spikes, whereby the shoe is protected by the overshoe and the spikes may grip a surface which the shoe and overshoe overlie.

6. A combination shoe and overshoe comprising: a shoe having a plurality of spikes projecting therefrom, the downwardly projecting portions of said spikes being of a certain length; said spikes each having an annular groove ofreduced diameter; an overshoe disengageably engageable with said shoe, said overshoe having a lower portion of a thickness substantially less than the length of said spikes; the lower portion of the overshoe having a plurality of orifices disposed therein, the material of the overshoe bordering said orifices being resilient; said orifices permitting the penetration therethrough and projection therebelow of the said spikes, the edges of said overshoe bordering the orifices acting to engage the grooves in said spikes, promoting a water tight joint thereat, whereby the shoe is protected by the overshoe and the spikes may grip a surface which the shoe may rest upon.

7. A combination shoe and overshoe comprising: a shoe having a plurality of spikes projecting therefrom, the downwardly projecting portions of said spikes being of a certain length; an overshoe disengageably engageable with said shoe, said overshoe having a lower portion of a thickness less than the length of said spikes, the lower portion of the overshoe having a plurality of orifices therein; the portions of the overshoe bordering said orifices being provided with reinforcing means which is detachably attachable to said spikes, when the spikes are passed through said orifices, the orifices thus permitting penetration therethrough and projection therebelow of the said spikes.

EILIO'I'I' H. FEINBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2607134 *May 27, 1949Aug 19, 1952Claude HarmonCalk for footwear
US2785481 *Dec 13, 1955Mar 19, 1957Henry JosephOvershoe with self-sealing sole and heel for spiked or cleated shoes
US3020654 *May 19, 1960Feb 13, 1962Mccann Donald HAuxiliary sole for sport shoes
US4638579 *Nov 27, 1985Jan 27, 1987Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed athletic shoe
US5381614 *Dec 15, 1993Jan 17, 1995Goldstein; MarcAim improving self-aligning golf shoes
US5822887 *Jun 6, 1997Oct 20, 1998Turner; Gregory D.Over-the-shoe athletic spat
US6038792 *Jul 23, 1997Mar 21, 2000Hauter; Bradley DavidSoccer shoe cover
US6568101Jun 3, 1998May 27, 2003Mark C. JansenSoftspike overshoes
US6748675 *Jun 5, 2002Jun 15, 2004Mizuno CorporationSole assembly for sports shoe
US6968634 *Mar 11, 2003Nov 29, 2005Ben DombowskyResilient strap-on sole cover
US7383646 *Oct 7, 2002Jun 10, 2008Hall Rodney RAthletic shoe cover
US7406781 *Feb 23, 2005Aug 5, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US7730637Jun 30, 2008Jun 8, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US7752775Jul 13, 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US7770306Aug 10, 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
US7854076 *Sep 8, 2006Dec 21, 2010Uhlsport GmbhSports shoe and method of its manufacture
US8209883Jul 3, 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
US8225530 *Jul 24, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US8567096May 2, 2011Oct 29, 2013Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US8745895Jun 7, 2012Jun 10, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US8959800Apr 25, 2014Feb 24, 2015Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US20030230006 *Mar 11, 2003Dec 18, 2003Ben DombowskyResilient strap-on sole cover
US20050193596 *Mar 5, 2004Sep 8, 2005Culton Dale M.Waterproof protective overshoe for golf shoes
US20050198868 *Feb 23, 2005Sep 15, 2005Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US20080110049 *Nov 10, 2006May 15, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US20080263904 *Jun 30, 2008Oct 30, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular Shoe
US20090320326 *Sep 8, 2006Dec 31, 2009Thomas KepplerSports shoe and method of its manufacture
US20100212192 *Aug 26, 2010Wolfgang ScholzModular Shoe
US20110203142 *Aug 25, 2011Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US20120198595 *Aug 9, 2012Young Tracy LArticle of clothing for cycling
US20120291310 *Jul 26, 2012Nov 22, 2012Paintin Janet AFully-Opening Footwear Systems
USD279138Dec 13, 1982Jun 11, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Athletic shoe with pocket
USD279232Dec 13, 1982Jun 18, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Athletic shoe
USD279327Oct 23, 1981Jun 25, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc.Athletic boot with pocket
USD280776Sep 29, 1982Oct 1, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Athletic shoe with pocket
USD280777Oct 25, 1982Oct 1, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Athletic shoe with wraparound pocket
USD280778Oct 25, 1982Oct 1, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed boot
USD280862Oct 25, 1982Oct 8, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed shoe
USD280949Apr 1, 1983Oct 15, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc.Athletic shoe with padded counter
USD281116Oct 23, 1981Oct 29, 1985KangaroosPocketed athletic shoe upper
USD281117Aug 28, 1981Oct 29, 1985Envoys U.S.A. Inc.Athletic shoe with pocket cover flap
USD281639Apr 1, 1983Dec 10, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Angle flapped pocketed athletic shoe
USD281640Jan 6, 1983Dec 10, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Basketball Shoe
USD281734Jul 5, 1983Dec 17, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Strap pocketed shoe
USD281736Jun 6, 1983Dec 17, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed casual gymnastic and aerobic shoe
USD281737Aug 5, 1983Dec 17, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed shoe
USD281738Aug 1, 1983Dec 17, 1985Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Athletic shoe for kicker
USD281925Jun 1, 1983Dec 31, 1985Kanagroos U.S.A., Inc.Boot with tongue pocket
USD283364Jan 17, 1983Apr 15, 1986Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc.Athletic shoe
USD283365Dec 13, 1982Apr 15, 1986Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc.Athletic shoe
USD283750Mar 28, 1985May 13, 1986Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Casual shoe with pocket
USD285261May 26, 1983Aug 26, 1986Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Purse pocketed shoe
USD287540Jul 22, 1985Jan 6, 1987Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Athletic shoe with pocket
USD289102Dec 16, 1985Apr 7, 1987Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed athletic shoe
USD291020Mar 30, 1984Jul 28, 1987Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed boot upper
USD291021Jun 4, 1984Jul 28, 1987Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/1, 36/67.00D, 36/7.3, 36/127, 36/134, 36/7.7, 36/59.00R
International ClassificationH01R4/64, A43C15/00, A43C15/16, A43B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/001, H01R4/64, A43C15/168
European ClassificationA43B5/00B, H01R4/64, A43C15/16R