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Publication numberUS2261073 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1941
Filing dateApr 22, 1938
Priority dateApr 22, 1938
Publication numberUS 2261073 A, US 2261073A, US-A-2261073, US2261073 A, US2261073A
InventorsPainter John Roy
Original AssigneePainter John Roy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Batteryless photoflash lamp flasher
US 2261073 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0a. 28, 1941. J. R. PAINTER 2,261,073

BATTERYLESS PHOTOFLASH LAMP FLASHER Filed April 22, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet l Oct. 28, 1941'. JR. mm 2,261,073

BATTERYLESS PHOTOFLASH LAMP FLASHER Filed April 22, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I I 1 A .5 a 4v 55' x 5.9 :1 52 A J I;

. Patented Oct. 28, 1941 BATTERYLESS PHOTOFLASH LAMP FLASHER John Roy Painter, Chattanooga, Tenn.

Application April 22, 1938, Serial No. 203,685

4 Claims.

My invention relates to an improvement in batteryless photo flash lamp flashers.

The primary object of my invention is to provide a flasher designed to'take the place 6f the present type of flasher in general use commonly equipped with dry cells, my present invention being a self-generating unit powered by a motor which rotates an armature in a surrounding magnetic field and generates enough electricity to ignite a photographic flash lamp.

The use for my improved batteryless photo flash lamp flasher is in taking flash light pictures and to entirely dispense with the use of dry cells and to make the use of photo flash lamps more certain. This invention is not subject to any more deterioration, gradual loss of magnetism, electric leakage etc., than any other magnets such as those used in internal combustion engines etc, or flash-light dry cells, as there is nothing about this instrument to deteriorate either by use or lack of use since sufficient current to flash the lamp is produced the instant the armature employed turns, and one revolution is all that is necessary to generate an adequate amount of energy to flash the lamp, although more than one revolution sometimes may be desirable since the maximum output of current is reached only at a certain speed, which, possibly, under some circumstances, cannot be attained in a single revolution starting from a standstill.

This instrument can be used continuously to flash a lamp just as fast as the operator can wind the motor, reload and flash the lamp, without the instrument showing any sign of fatigue. Also it can be laid aside for weeks, months, or even years, and still be ready for instant use.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is an elevation mainly in longitudinal section showing one .form of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on line 2- 2 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 3 is a slightly modified form of the invention in section and elevation;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal section on line 4-4 of vFig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;

and

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic view showing the flasher, a synchronizer, a shutter and a camera lens connected together.

grounded on the armature shaft 5 by the wire 2'; 3 is a commutator and which is electrically connected to the other end of the armature winding by the wire 2", on the armature shaft 5; 4 is a commutator brush secured to the brush holder i iiand exerting spring pressure on the commutator as indicated in Fig. 1.

The numeral 6 represents a release ratchet wheel, and 8 is'an upper spring connector, both of which are secured preferably,,adjacent to each other, on the lower end of the armature shaft 5; and 1 indicates a release trigger extending outside of the instrument in convenient position to be depressed by the operators thumb or finger.

The stem of this release trigger conveniently straddles the armature shaft 5 where it is slidably mounted and spring-actuated to normally project it outwardly to the position shown in Fig. 1. The release ratchet 6 is controlled by a springactuated pawl I9, which normally-engages and locks the release ratchet 6, but which is connected to the stem of the release trigger I and is disengaged from the teeth of the release ratchet 6 when the trigger I is pressed inwardly.

The lower spring-connector 9 corresponds to the upper spring connector 8, and the spring motor l3 extends from one connector to the other and its opposite ends are secured to these conmotors, and the spring motor is housed in the spring motor case H, which may be conveniently grasped by the operator and used as a handle.

In the construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2, A,

This case I! is secured at its upper end to the.

. is guided by a notch 2| in the upper end of the spring case I! and the lower end of the generator case 18.

The lower spring connector 9 has an angular hole in its center to receive the ratchet stem ill of similar cross-section as a means for causing the lower spring connector 9 and stem ll to turn together just as the upper spring connector 8 receives the angular lowerend or armature shaft 5 to cause them to turn together.

A winding ratchet I l is secured on the ratchet stem [0 and is adapted to turn with it, and this winding ratchet is allowed to turn in one direction by the spring-actuated pawl 22 which locks it against reverse movement. The winding ratchet I l and the pawl 22 are confined within the cap 23, which latter is secured to the lower end of spring case I! in any approved manner. A winding knob 12 is secured on the protrudlng'end oi ratchetstem I 0. j J

Magnets l4 are located within the generator case i8, as shown in Fig. 1.

From the foregoing, it will be understood that this instrument provides a small, compact generator built on the principle of a magneto, and by turning the winding knob |2 clockwise, energy is stored in the spring motor |3 by merely twisting it tightly and giving it extra tension.

The spring motor l3 is secured at one end thereof to the pawl controlled stem l0, and at the other end to the upper connector 8 and thereby to the armature shaft and the armature 2. Thus by exerting pressure on the release trigger i, the upper connector 8, the armature shaft 5 and armature 2 will be caused to revolve under the stored tension of the spring motor l3. The winding knob i2, secured on an end of the stem it, may be given a complete revolution or as high as three or four complete turns if desired, and when the armature shaft 5 is released, the armature 2 will spin a sufiicient number of times to generate more than enough electricity to easily flash the lamp. By using a three-way socket, as high as three lamps may be flashed at one time, and by this simple means no dry cells are used or required.

The reason that more than one revolution of the winding knob is sometimes made, is that the maximum output of current is reached only at a certain speed of the armature, which maximum may not always be reached by one revolution starting from a standstill.

The construction shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 is in the main the same as that shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The principle is precisely the same, and the difference is largely in details such as a slightly different arrangement of the spring which furnishes the power and the addition of a device for releasing a shutter on a camera, and for convenience this form of device is adapted to be fastened to the camera box in any approved manner, as for example this may be done by means of a thumb-screw, using the threaded hole in the side of the camera which is usually provided for the tripod.

The numeral 30 indicates the wires for the socket 3|; 32, is the armature secured to the armature shaft 35 to which one end of ,the armature winding is grounded by the wire 32'; 33, is the collector ring also secured on the upper end of the armature shaft 35 and to which the other end of the armature winding is attached by the wire 32"; 34 is the collector brush secured to the brush holder 46. A single toothed release ratchet 35 is secured to the armature shaft 35 somewhere near its lower end, and a release trigger 31 is constructed and arranged like release trigger 1 in Fig. 1, to control the release ratchet 36. The armature is prevented from turning by this release ratchet 36. A driving ratchet 33 as well as release ratchet 38 are secured to the lower end of the armature shaft 35.

A plate 39 is loosely mounted on the shaft 35, which shaft passes through a tubular stub shaft 33' which is secured to the plate 33. The stub shaft is counter-bored to allow the nut 35 to be screwed on the shaft 35 to hold the plate 33 and its stub-shaft 39' in proper alignment on the shaft 35. The plate 39 carries pawls 53 and 51, by which it is locked to the driving ratchet 38 in one direction. A convolute spring 43 is between the spring motor case 41 and the plate 53'.

The upper portion of the overriding clutch 40 is securedto the stub shaft 33, while the lower portion thereof is secured to the stub shaft 59. The stub shaft 59 is connected through a chain of gears 42 to a winding lever 4| extending from one end of the spring motor case 41, which end is provided with a projecting stud which serves as a stop for the winding lever.

The numeral 44 represents the magnets; 41, is the spring motor case; 48 is the generator case; 48 is the cable release; 50 is a cable release holder; 5| is a cable release cam secured on the armature shaft 35, in proper alignment with the one tooth 36 on the release ratchet 36, and in position to engage the cable release presser 54 as the cam traverses it with the turning of the armature shaft; and 52 is an electric connection leading to a synchronizer; and 53 is the return connection.

Thus the springs I3 and 43 are in effect motors for turning over or spinning the armature.

The wiring hook-up is as follows: One side of the line is taken oiT at collector ring 33 by brush 34 and then into one electrode of the socket 3|. The other side is grounded to generator case 43, which side is taken off at synchronizer connection 52 and leads to the synchronizer (Fig. 6) and the return is connected to return-connection 53, which is insulated from the generator case 48, so that when the synchronizer contacts are closed, the circuit is completed and the current is conducted to flash-bulb socket 3|, causing the bulb to flash. The armature winding at one end is grounded to the armature shaft. The other end passes into the shaft (which must be hollow) and to the collector ring 33.

The method of operation of the construction shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, is as follows:

As the operator prepares to make an exposure, he first winds the spring motor by winding lever 4| around to stop 55 which is approximately one revolution, which winds spring 43 four turns, through winding gears 42 designed to give a ratio of four to one. The armature 32 is kept from turning by release ratchet 35. This puts the machine in position for instant generation of current. Next, the flash bulb is installed; then the shutter is set. (If a Kalart synchronizer is used. it must also be set; but if a simple sliding contact synchronizer is used, it will need no setting.)

wound around the lower end of the armature The picture may now be taken. As the operator sights the camera and is ready to "snap the picture, he presses the release trigger 31 which releases the spring motor, which in turn spins the armature and generates electric current. When the motor is wound, the cam 5| automatically takes up its place just beyond the cable release presser 54 because of the cam's fixed relation to the one tooth on the ratchet 33, which latter automatically comes to bear against the release trigger 31.

The cable release is of conventional construction, such as those used on many standard cameras, and can be procured in many lengths at any camera shop. There is a spring in the cable release and this spring causes the cable release presser 54 to remain in contact with the cam 5|.

When the release trigger 31 is pressed, the armature immediately turns, the cam 5| rotates in a clockwise direction and actuates the release presser 54, which leads to the shutter (Pig. 6)

and through the action of the synchronizer (Fig. 6) which can be used in connection with the cable release, or directly to the shutter (depending on the type used), the flash is made at the right instant. The armature 32 is allowed to make one revolution before releasing the shutter in order that the generator might have time to build up suflicient voltage.

I claim:

1. The combination with a case, an armature and armature shaft rotatably supported therein, a magnet located within the case, a spring motor connected directly to the armature shaft for transmitting rotary motion to the armature and shaft, a light socket, a flash lamp, 9. commutator on the armature shaft, a brush contacting said commutator, and wires leading from the socket one to the brush, and one being suitably grounded,

a cable release, and means actuated by the armature shaft for automatically moving said cable release to cause the latter to actuate a camera shutter synchronizer, whereby the movement of the shutter and the flash are synchronized.

2. The combination with a case, an armature and armature shaft rotatably supported therein, a magnet located within the case, a spring motor connected directly to the armature shaft for transmitting rotary motion to the armature and shaft, a light socket flash lamp, a commutator on the armature shaft, a brush contacting said commutator, and a wire leading from the socket to the brush, a wire leading from the socket being suitably grounded, a cable release, means actuated by the armature shaft for moving said cable release to cause the latter to actuate a camera shutter synchronizer, whereby the movement of the shutter and the flash are synchronized, means connected with the spring motor for twisting and storing energy'in the latter, and means for automatically releasing the spring motorwhereby its energy is transmitted to the armature.

3. A self contained photographic flash bulb flasher including an outer case, a magnetic field within the case, an armature supported on a shaft within said magnetic field, a spring motor connected directly with said shaft, a flash bulb socket electrically connected with the said armature, a trigger adapted to hold the armature from turning, a camera shutter, a shutter cable, a shutter cable release cam mounted on the armature shaft, and means for winding the spring motor, said trigger adapted to release the armature shaft, whereby the armature rotates to energize the bulb, and the cable release cam rotates to operate the shutter cable.

4. A photographic flash bulb flasher including a case, a magnetic field within said case, a shaft and armature positioned within the case and holding the armature revolvably within the said magnetic field, a spring motor connected directly to the shaft, a flash bulb socket electrically cbnnected to the armature, a release trigger adapted to hold the armature and shaft from revolving as the spring motor is wound, a shutter cable, a shutter cable release cam mounted on the armature shaft, and a camera shutter, the said trigger adapted to release the armature shaft, whereby the armature rotates to energize the bulb and the cable release cam rotates to operate the shut-- ter cable.

JOHN ROY PAINTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2542164 *Aug 31, 1946Feb 20, 1951J B Wood CorpFlash lamp igniter and shutter synchronizer
US2972937 *Mar 14, 1958Feb 28, 1961Gen ElectricFlash apparatus
US3599022 *Jul 7, 1970Aug 10, 1971Singer CoImpulse generator for meters
US6140776 *Apr 6, 1999Oct 31, 2000Rachwal; Erwin J.Flashlight
US6239555Sep 8, 2000May 29, 2001Erwin J. RachwalFlashlight
US6388390May 4, 2001May 14, 2002Erwin J. RachwalFlashlight
Classifications
U.S. Classification396/185, 310/154.1, D16/239, 362/197, 310/75.00A, 362/8, 362/192
International ClassificationF21K5/12
Cooperative ClassificationF21K5/023
European ClassificationF21K5/02B