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Publication numberUS2261355 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1941
Filing dateJul 14, 1939
Priority dateJul 14, 1939
Publication numberUS 2261355 A, US 2261355A, US-A-2261355, US2261355 A, US2261355A
InventorsJerome Flynn
Original AssigneeRobert A Bussey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Invalid's exercising chair
US 2261355 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 4, 1941. J. FLYNN 2,261,355

INVALIDS EXERCISING CHAIR Filed July 14, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet l Nov. 4, 1941. J, FLYNN 2,261,355

INVALIDS EXERGISING CHAIR Filed July 14, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Nov. 4, 1941 lNVALlDS EXERCISING CHAIR rJerome Flynn, St. `Louis, Mo., assignor of onefourth to Robert A. Bussey, St. Louis, Mo.

Application July 14, 1939, Serial No.,284,410

5 Claims.

This invention relates to invalids exercising chairs; and has special reference to chairs for use by persons amicted with partial paralysis,

' particularly of the legs or arms, to exercise the afflicted limbs properly to promote recovery thereof.

An object of the invention is to provide an exercising chair for use by invalids having partial paralysis or like aillictions affecting one or both legs, comprising a seat in combination with one o r two rotary pedals to supportI one foot or both feet of the user, and mechanism for rotating said pedal or pedals to bend and straighten the knee joints repeatedly and successively and thereby subject the limbs to exercise of the character ordinarily performed in walking or swimming, or similar activities.

Other objects of the invention arev to provide an invalids exercising chair having* a seat in combination with pedals for supporting the feet of the user, and power mechanism for rotating said pedals to exercise the legs of the user when the feet are engaged with the pedals; to provide mechanism for varying the speed of rotation of the pedals to meet different needs or requirements; to provide manual means for assisting or wholly effecting the rotation of the pedals as desired, and also for exercising the arms of the user; to provide means for holding the legs of the user in proper position for exercise and preventing their displacement or distortion in any way by operation of the device; and to provide means for holding said pedals and the chair in different spaced positions for use by persons of different heights.

Other objects of the invention will be readily apparent from the following detailed description, reference being made to the annexed drawings, in whichi Fig. l is a plan view with a part of the seat broken away illustrating my improved invalids exercising chair.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged vertical cross-sectional view of the variable speed driving mechanism for the pedals approximately on the line 3--3 of Fig. l.

Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view of the chair seat from the line 4-4 of Fig. 2, showing the releasable devices for controlling the arm rests.

Fig. 5.. is a side elevation of one of the -arm rest links.

Fig. 6 is a view approximately from the line 6 6 of Fig. 2, showing one of the devices for@ Cri steadylng and retaining the legs in proper po- I sition for exercise.

Fig. -7 is a plan view `of one of the pedals and the spacers therefor.

My improved chair is readily movable, and comprises a base or frame I preferably supported upon caster rollers 2 and of such dimensions as to support the entire chair and other mechanism. A pair of frames comprising standards 3 and horizontal upper portions 4 are attached to the upper side of the bas'e I in laterally spaced relationship. A cross member 5 has bearings 6 on its ends. The frame parts 4 extend through the bearings 6 and thereby support the'cross member 5 for movement forwardly and rearwardly to different adjusted positions. One or more of the bearings 6 may be equipped with a cross clamp 1 to engage the frame parts 4.and hold the cross member 5, and therebythe chair, in its different adjusted positions. Midway between the frame parts 4, the cross member 5 is formed with a bearing portion 8 to receive the swivel shaft 9 having its upper end attached 'to the underside of and supporting the chair seat I0. A manually operative adjusting wheel II is screwed on'the swivel shaft 9 in the familiar cooperative relationship with the bearing 8 to l move said swivel shaft, and thereby the chair, vertically to different heights.

A back rest member I2 has its lower end mounted on a pivot I3 supported at the rear end of the seat I0. The lower end of the back rest member I2 has an arm I4 in connection therewith extending forwardly under the chair seat. A screw device I5 extends through the arm I4 and has its upper end engaging an abutment plate I6 attached to the underside of the chair seat III and its lower end provided with a handle I1 whereby said screw I5 may be turned to hold the back rest I2 in different adjusted positions. 'I'he screw device I5 constitutes means for supporting the back rest at different angles of inclination with respect to the seat. A cushion I8` is preferably secured to the front of the back, and a head rest I9 is supported by frames 20 attached to the rear of the back I2. A set screw 2| is mounted in one of the frames 20 for engaging and holding the head rest in different adjusted positions.

An arm rest 22 is located at each side of the seat I0. Said arm rests are pivoted to the upper ends of links 23 and 24 having their lower ends pivoted to the sides of the seat I0 for swinging movements from horizontal to vertical positions, and vice versa. In their vertical positions, the

links 24 engage against abutments 25 attached to the sides of the seat ill. Each of the links 24 has two notches 25 in its opposite edges below its supporting pivot 21 adapted to receive the arms 28 of a slide 29. The slides 29 are secured to the bottom of the seat I by supporting screws passing throughv slots 3l in said slides and engaging in the seat i8 and leaving the slides 29 free for inward and outward sliding movements. When in their'outward positions, the arms 28 are engaged within the notches 25 and embrace the lower ends of the links 24 between them, and thereby support said links 24 vertically against the abutments 25. 'I'he arm rests 22 are thereby supported in their upper positions. By moving the slides 29 inwardly, the arms 25 will be disengaged from the links 24, leaving said links 24 and the links 23 free for rearward and downward swinging movements to approximately horizontal positions in which the upper surfaces of the arm rests 22 are nearly level with the top of the seat i0. In such positions, the lower ends of the links 24 are engaged against the undersides of the abutments 25 and thereby supported and held from further downward swinging movements.

A pair of posts 32 are attached to the upper side of the base I in front of the chair. A horizontal shaft 33 is journalled for rotation in the upper ends of the posts 32, and has a socket 34 rigid with each end thereof. A pedal crank 35 extends through each of the sockets 34 and is l held in different adjusted positions by a set screw 35. These pedal cranks may be formed with graduations thereon to cooperate with the sockets 34, so that said cranks may be more easily located in the same positions. A pedal 31 similar to a bicycle pedal is rotatively supported by a pedal-pin 38 projecting from one end of each of the pedal cranks 35. By adjusting the pedal cranks 35 within the sockets 34, the diameter of the orbit of rotation of the pedals 31 may be increased or reduced asr desired. Spacers 39 may be mounted on the pedal pin 38 at one or both sides of the pedals 31 to spread the two pedals further apart or hold them closer together or in different spaced relationships, according to individual needs.

Rods 40 have their lower ends engaged with sockets 4I rotatively supported on the pedal pins 38 beyond the outer ends of the respective pedals 31. These rods extend upwardly through yokes 42, and have handles 43 attached thereto below said yokes. These handles project angularly from the rods 40, preferably outwardly from saidrods, for convenient manual engagement to exercise the arms, or to assist in rotating the pedals, or to rotate the pedals independently of the operating mechanism. Knobs 44 are attached to the upper ends of the rods 40. The guide yokes 42 are attached to the outer ends of rods 45 which telescope within the ends of a tube 45 attachedA to a post 41 secured to the base I in front of the pedal mechanism.l The rods 45 may be adjusted inwardly and outwardly and are held from turning with respect to the tube 45 by pin and slot devices 48, and may be held rigid in any of their adjusted positions by lock nuts 49 of conventional arrangement. l

An approximately U-shaped leg support 58 is adjustably mounted on each of the rods 40. A sleeve 5i is attached to each support 55 and is mounted for sliding movements along the adjacent rod 40. A clamping screw device 52 is carried by each socket 5i for clamping engagement with the rod 40 to secure the leg support 58 in its dinerent adjusted positions along said rod 40. A spring .53 may connect the sockets 4I with the frames of the pedals 31 to hold said pedals yieldingly in proper position to receive the feet of the user of the chair.

An electric motor 54 is mounted on the base I beneath the chair, and the circuit for supplying energy to saldi motor may be controlled by a switch 55 mounted on the upper end of the post 41 as shown in Fig. 2 or arranged elsewhereas desired. 'I'he motor rotates a shaft 55 having a worm 55 thereon engaging a worm. gear 51 attached to a shaft 58 supported for rotation below and transversely of the plane of the shaft 55. A clutch 59 is mounted for sliding movements on the shaft 58 and connected thereto by a key 50. The hub of the clutch 59 is formed with a circumferential groove 5| operatively connected with a lever 52 mounted on a supporting pivot 53 (Fig. l) and having a pin 54 adapted to be engaged in and disengaged from holes 55 in a lock device 55. Therefore, the lever 52 is operative to shift the clutch 59 along the shaft 58 to and from clutchingl engagement with a pulley member 61. The pulley member 51 is mounted on the shaft 58 and is held from longitudinal movement l by a pin 58 engaged in a circumferential groove hal 59 in said shaft 58. When the clutch 59 is moved along the shaft 58 into clutching engagement with the pulley member 51, said pulley member will be rotated by the shaft 58; and, when the clutch 59 is free from the pulley member 51, the shaft 58 may rotate while the pulley member 51 remains stationary.

A cooperating pulley member 1U is mounted on the shaft 59. The outer adjacent margins of the pulley members 51 and 10 have diverging walls 1I forming a V-pulley engaged by a complementarily shaped belt 12 which also engages a pulley 13 attached to the shaft 33 between the posts 32 and essentially between the pedals 31 so as not to interfere with the use of the device when the feet of the user are upon the pedals 31.

The hub of the pulley member 18 is formed with a circumferential groove 14 (Fig. 3) receiving a finger 15 projecting from a manually operative adjusting device 15 which, as shown, is in the form of a hand wheel. The wheel 15 is screwed on a shaft 11 having one end extending into a socket 18 in the shaft 58 and constituting means for holding said shafts 58 and 11 in axial alinement, even though the shaft 58 rotates and the shaft 11 does not. The outer end of the shaft 11 is mounted in a support 19 and held from rotation by a pin 80. When the wheel 15 is screwed along the shaft 11, the pulley member 19 will be moved toward or from the cooperating pulley member 51, depending upon the direction of rotation of said hand wheel 15. Therefore, the effective diameter of the pulley formed by the cooperating members 51 and 18 can be increased or reduced to tension or relax the belt 12 as desired. Thereby the speed of rotation of the pedals 31 may be varied; and

when the belt 12 is slack and not under sufficient tension to rotate the pedals having the feet of the user thereon, the lever rods 40 may I be manually operated to assist the power mech-.-

anism in rotating the pedals. member 1li is moved far enough away from the pulley member 51, the space between said pulleys will receive the belt 12 loosely, and both pulley members may be left unoperated by disengaging the clutch 59 from the pulley member When the pulley` 61. This permits the belt 12 to move tothe ineffective and lax position shown in Fig. 2, leaving the pedals 31 free for operation by the user independently of the driving mechanism therefor. Then, when it is desired to operate the pedals by the motor, the pulley member 10 is again moved into cooperative relationship with the pulley member 61 to engage the belt 12 in the V-portion of the pulley for operation by the motor.

When the chair is used for exercising the arms or legs of an invalid, the patient is seated on the chair seat l; his feet are placed on the pedals 31; his lower limbs are engaged within the supports U; and his hands are engaged with the handles 43 to exercise the arms or to control the rods 40, or for both of said purposes. The legs may be exercised by operating the motor 54 and the connections therefrom to rotate the pedal shaft 33, and thereby the pedals 31 on which the feet rest; or, when the legs of the patient are capable, the pedals may be operated by the legsof the patient without operation of the motor 54. Thus, when the legs of the patient are strong enough, but need exercise, the pedals 31 may be operated by the legs of the patient without operation of the motor. And, when the legs of the patient cannot operate the pedals 31 unaided, the motor may be driven to operate said pedals and thereby exercise the legs of the patient; or, the rods 40 may be operated' by the hands to assist in operating the pedals. In` either instance, the legs of the patient are engaged in the supports 50. Also, in either instance, the hands of the patient are engaged on the handles 43 so that the arms of the patient will be exercised when such exercise is needed. When the motor 54 is not in operation, the patient may exercise his arms and legs by operating the handles 43 and thereby the rods 40 and pedals 31 by energy applied by his arms. The pedal shaft 33 and the parts connected thereto are located close enough to the seat I0 so that the feet of the person on said seat Ill may be engaged with the pedals 31, his lower limbs engaged in the supports 50, and his hands engaged with the handles 43.

It should be apparent that the arrangement and relationship of the parts may be varied widely within the scope of equivalent limits without departure from the nature and principle of the invention. I contemplate such variations as may be desired in orderV to adapt the invention for its intended uses.

I claim:

1. A portable invalids exercising chair comprising a support, a chair, means carried by said support for holding said chair in different adjusted positions above said support, a pair of rotary pedals mounted on said support in front of said chair in position to be engaged by the feet of the occupant of the chair, means for holding said pedals in different spaced adjustments, power mechanism for rotating said pedals, means for varying the speed of rotation of said pedals by said power mechanism, manually operable levers pivotally carried by said pedals for assisting said power mechanism to rotate said pedals, and supports carried by said levers for engaging and supporting the legs of the user during rotation of said pedals.

2. A portable device of the character described comprising a chair, a rotary shaft supported QlCIeDU Speeds aS desired, means fOr Vafll'ying the orbits of rotation of said pedals, manually operative connections for operating said pedals independently of said mechamsm, supports carried by said connections for engaging and supporting the legs of the occupant or the chair during rotation of said pedals, and devices for guiding said connections properly during operation thereof.

3. A portable device of the character described comprising a supporting frame, a chair mounted on said frame, a horizontal shaft supported for rotation in front of said chair, a pair of pedals attached to the ends of said shaft in positions to be engaged by the feet of the occupant of the chair, mechanism for rotating said shaft and thereby said pedals, devices for varying the speed of rotation of said shaft while said mechanism operates at constant speed, a device controlling operation of said mechanism, means for securing said pedals in different adjusted positions in connection with said shaft to vary the orbits o1 rotation of said pedals, levers pivotally supported by said pedals for operating the same, supports adjustably carried by said levers for engaging and supporting the legs of the occupant of the chair, and guides for said levers.

4. A portable device of the character described comprising a chair, a rotary shaft in front of said chair, a pair of pedal arms, pedals carried by said arms adapted to be engaged by the feet of the occupant of the chair, means for attaching said arms to said shaft in different adJusted positions to vary the orbits of rotation of said pedals by said shaft, rods pivotally connected with and supported by said pedals, handles attached to said rods for operating the same to rotate said pedals, guides for said rods, supports for engaging and supporting the legs of the occupant of the chair during rotation of said pedals by said rods, and means for securing said supports to said rods in dilerent adjusted positions.

5. A portable device of the character described comprising a chair, a rotary shaft in front of said chair, a pair of pedal arms, pedals carried by said arms and adapted to be engaged by the feet of the occupant of the chair, means for attaching said arms to said shaft in different adjusted positions to vary the orbits of rotation of said pedals by said shaft, rods pivotally connected with and supported by said pedals, handles attached to said rods for operating the same to rotate said pedals, guides for said rods,

supports for engaging and supporting the legs of the occupant of the chair during rotation of said pedals by said rods, means for securing said supports to said rods in different adjusted positions, and means for holding said chair in different adjusted positions with respect to said pedals and said rods. Y JEROME FLYNN.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/26, 474/38, 74/594.3, 601/32, 474/39
International ClassificationA61H1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H1/02
European ClassificationA61H1/02