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Publication numberUS2265251 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1941
Filing dateApr 4, 1938
Priority dateApr 4, 1938
Publication numberUS 2265251 A, US 2265251A, US-A-2265251, US2265251 A, US2265251A
InventorsClair S Reed
Original AssigneeReynolds Spring Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring cushion construction
US 2265251 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 9, 1941. c. s. REED 2,265,251

SPRING CUSHION CONSTRUCTION Filed April 4, 1958 7 Sheets-Sheet l V Clair 5, Reed -g vm g f Dec. 9, 1941.. c, s. REED srnmecnsnxon consmucnou Filed April 4,- 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Clair 5. Reed Dec. 1941- c. s. REED 2,265,251.

SPRING CUSHION CONSTRUCTION 'Filed April 4, 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Fi7. ll

gwua/wbom Clair 5. Reed Dec. 9, 1941 c. s. REED- 2,265,251

SPRINGFCUSHION CONSTRUCTION Filed April 4. 1938 '1 Sheets-Sheet 5 v 1941- Cis. REED 2,265,251

SPRING' CUSHION CONSTRUCTION I Filed April 4, 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 ammo Lo n I Cila ir SQ/Feea w, 247% 1941- c. s. REED 2,265,251

SPRING'YCUSHION consmucwron Filed April 4', 1958 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 swam bob C/air 5. Reed Patented Dec. 9, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SPRING CUSHION CONSTRUCTION Clair S. Reed, Jackson, Mich assignor to Reyna olds Spring Company, Jackson, Micln, a corporation of Delaware Application April 4, 1938, Serial No. 199,887

7 Claims. (m ss-119) cushion should be yielding so as to possess a soft feeling, yet sufliciently resistant to extreme de- 10 flection as to avoid striking bottom due to road, shock. Toaiford adequate head room in the automobile it is desirable that the seat cushion have the appearance and feeling of considerable depth;

yet be of minimum thickness. In this respect commercial practices up to the present invention have been of a compromising nature. The matter of cost has prevented the use of soft coil springs superimposed upon stiffer coil springs for obtaining a soft upper stratum and a lower weight supporting and shock resisting stratum. Also, in all commercial constructions of which I have knowledge the supporting frames for the cushions have presented a bottom encounterable upon extreme deflection or depression of the cushions. In an effort to obtain greater riding comfort with the conventional type of spring cushions the depth of the spring structure and the overhang for leg support and appearance has created a trimming problem which compels ac- 3o tual distortion ofthe spring structure in-order to obtain the desired contours, which for the most part are of a fugitive nature due to the breakdown action normal use has upon the spring and frame structural elements of conventional cushions used in automobiles. v l

In the patented art appear numerous suggestions ofcushion spring constructions which embody some of the elements appearing in the combinations of the present invention. For the most part, these suggestions have as their main object a reduction in the cost of construction through the elimination of coil springs. In most cases the attempt to securesuch a' result has been mad through the use of springs in the form of flattened loops.

According to the present inventipn in its pre-i ferred form, I associate both loop and compression spring elements in a novel manner, providing a cushion which'is a substantial improvem ent over constructions now in use. The cushion is thin, eas'y'to trim, possesses excellent riding qualities and feel, and may be termed asoffering a bottomless support. Also illustrated are numerous other forms of the invention in which only loop springs are utilized in the cushion construction. However, where this type of spring is being used alone I have overcome certain limitations present in similar constructions in the patented art through a novel spring construction and support. Other features of the invention pertain to ventilation of the-cushion and the manner in which the seat and back cushions are adaptable to sheet metal and tubular frame structures.

.To specifically enumerate the various objects of the present invention, one of the objects is to provide a cushion construction embodying loop and compression springs associated in a manner producing relatively thin cushions of improved supporting qualities.

Another object is to provide seat and back spring structures for cushions in vehicles, which because of their construction enable the same to be directly supported upon a skeleton seat frame and in a manner making possible a reduction in weight as well as affording improved ventilation.

A further object resides in providing a spring cushion structure which may be readily trimmed without distortion, affords adequate support to the trim, and maintains its original untrimmed contour even after extensive service.

A still further object resides in a spring cushion constituted as its own supporting frame structure, in which tacking strips have been eliminated and the trim secured in a novel manner.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention residing in the arrangement, construction and combination of parts too numerous to be specifically mentioned in the foregoing stated objects will appear from consideration of the following detailed description and the appended claims. 7 g

In the drawings. wherein a large number of various forms of. the invention are illustrated in order that the invention may be clearly understood and the contemplated broad scope of the invention more clearly appreciated.

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a seat frame embodying cushions constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary front elevational view of' a portion of the seat cushion and frame shown in Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail of a portion of the seat frame and seat cushion shown in broken section in Fig. 1,

Fig; 4 is a cross-sectional view of the seat and back cushions associated in the relative positions illustrated in Fig. 1.

a removed, as shown in Fig. 4,

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the back cushion spring structure with the trim Fig. 6 is a fragmentary plan view of the spring structure of the seat cushion with the trim removed, as shown in Fig. 4,

Fig. '7 is a cross-sectional view taken on line VII-VII of Fig. 6,

Fig. 8 is a broken cross-sectional view taken on line VIIIVIII of Fig. 6,

Figs. 9, 10- and 11 are fragmentary plan views of modified forms of the stay structure for the transverse loop springs of the spring structure,

Fig. 12 i a fragmentary plan ,view of another form of arrangement of theloop and compression spring elements,

Fig. 13 is a view similar to Figs. 6 and 9 showing a spring embodying only loop transverse p ngs,

Fig. 14 is an end view of the construction of Fig. 6 as viewed from the right,

Figs. 15 and 16 are side and plan views, respectively, of the transverse loop spring element 'of the construction shown in Fig. 7,

Figs. 17 and 18 are side and plan views, respectively, of a modified form of transverse loop spring element,

Figs. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24 are side elevational views of various forms of loop spring ele ments particularly designed for seat cushions,

Fig. 25 is a side elevational view of the transverse loop spring element of the back cushion shown in Fig. 4,

Figs. 26 and 27 are side elevational and plan views, respectively, of a modified type of loop spring element similar to that of Fig. 5 to be used in the back cushion of Fig. l, and

Figs. 28 and 29 are fragmentary side and plan views, respectively, of a combined 100p and compression spring, making up a transverse spring element.

Referring to the drawings, in Fig; 1 is shown in side elevation the front seat of an automobile embodying the present invention. It is to be understood, however, that the invention has equal application to rear seats aswell. As illustrated, the seat frame comprises a stamped sheet metal base 10 having openwork panels l2 at the front and side toenable air to circulate into the interior. The central upper portion of the base I8 is preferably entirely open,,with the.

as more clearly shown in Figs. 1, 4, 5 and 25, comprises a plurality of main loop springs 24 each taking the shape of a relatively flat, elongated, cldsed loop of heat treated spring wire. The front'and back central portions 64 and 66 of the springs 24 are preferably undulated in the plane of the supporting surface of the cushion so as to permit deflection without longitudinal shortening, as well as servingto space the coil springs 38 and afford support to the padding and trim. The ends of the spring structure are furnished through the employment of springs 82. 84'and 36, which are generally similar to the springs 24. These springs have offsets 38 which permit securing the springs in spaced relation through suitable clips 48. For providing' the desired contour to the cushion when trimmed or upholstered, each outside spring 36 is shown with straight front and back portions 42 and 44 merging into a return bend 46 which is curved inwardly and clipped at 48 to the spring 34 so as to give a rounded comer when trimmed; I

The spacing of the transverse loop springs 24, 32, 34 and 36 is shown to 'be accomplished through border wires 58, 52 and 54 and a tacking frame member 56 all running longitudinally of the cushion spring structure. For securing the wires 50, 52and 54 to the transverse springs, the same are formed with offset-right angular portions, which are embraced, together with the transverse' springs, by clips 58. The tacking frame member 56 may be of any well known construction, being preferably of a fibre filled sheet metal channel with an exposed outer face.

Holes are punched along the member 56 to re--.

ceive fasteners 60,- which embrace the loop springs and hold the springs and member 56 in assembled spaced relationby having their ends 62 bent over.

The spring elements 24 are preferably spaced apart a distance slightly in excess of the largest diameter of the terminal coils of the springs 30, the coils 38 being illustrated as of a fabric covered Marshall type. However, other types may be used in lieu thereof, such as cone shape, hour glass shape, etc.' As more clearly shown in Fig. 25, theelement 24 has afront section 64 and a rear section 66, the latter being offset at 68 to accommodate the bar l8. To provide softness along the lower edge of the back cushion 22, return bend portions .18 and 12 are provided, the latter having a loop I4. Likewise, for providing softness at the top of the cushion, a loop 16 is provided. Preferably the spring elements 24 are fabricated from a continuous strand of steel wire.with the ends joined by clips 18.

After being shaped as shown in Fig. 25, the

- spring 24' is then heat treated. As will be understood from Figs. 4 and 5, the springs30' are suspended from the portions 64 and 66 of the spring elements 24 by hog rings 88 embracing.

the terminal convolutions of the coil springs 38, Upon deflection of the portions 64 of the spring elements 24, the coils 38 will be compressed. As the resistance 'of the coils 30 to compression is built up, deflection of the portions 66 will take place. Obviously, the portions 66 can only deflect between their points of support, namely, between the offset 68 supported by the bar I 8 and the tackingframe 56, which is supported at its ends on the leg portions 20 of the bar Hi. This arrangement gives what may be characbar I8 is located well below the top 84 of the cushion 22, which is a safety feature, as it provides a .soft resilient top against which a passenger in the rear seat of the vehicle may be thrown in the event of sudden stoppagewithout serious injury. ,To provide a supporting surface for the upholstery along the top 84 of the cushion 22 a mat of mattress wire 88 is anchored along its front edge to a wire 88 and carried over the top of the cushion and hog ringed to the wire 52 along its back edge. The upholstery 88 is shown covering a padded front surface of the cushion 22, as well as the rear surface, with the opposite ends tacked to the tacking strip 56. The springs 32, 34 and 36 are of substantially the same construction as the spring elements 24, with the exception of the offsets 38 and the the fact that the springs 34 and 36 do not have the loop I6 at the top of the cushion.

Referring to Figs. 1-4 and 6-8 of the drawings, the seat cushion is of the same general construction as the back cushion 22. The spring structure comprises transverse loop spring elements 90 having upper and lower'portions 92 and 94 preferably undulated in the plane of the supporting surface of the cushion, between which are suspended fabric encased coil springs 96 corresponding to the springs 30. At opposite ends of the spring structure (see Figs. 1 and 6) is a pair of spring elements 98 and I of the same general construction as the springs.90. To separate the springs I00 from the outside springs 98 the former are provided with offsets I02 in the upper and lower portions, which are secured to the springs 98 by suitable clips I04. The upper transverse portions of the springs 98 and I00 have central loops I05 to increase the resiliency 4 thereof. Preferably, these springs are of greater length than the main springs 90 so as to provide wings or extensions I06 which extend the side of the-upholstered cushion I6 "to a flush position with the' rear of the back cushion 22, as best seen in Fig. 1. To round'the corners of the cushion l6 prior to heat treatment, the semicircular front portions I08 of the springs 96 are deflected inwardly into an arc and clipped to the springs I00 at H0 in the manner of the return bent portions 46 of the cushion 22.

Upper and lower border and spacing wires II2 corresponding to the wires 50, 52 and 54 are 'used at the front and rear of the spring struc- These wires have longifront portion I28 of the springs 90 (see Figs"! and 14) One satisfactory manner of securing the trim to the spring structure and for securing the seat cushion I6. to the seat frame IJLtakes the form of longitudinal wires I30 and I 32, to which the upholstery is hog ringed or otherwise suitably fastened, as shown in Fig. 4. The hog rings I34 are shown as piercing the upholstery and are suitably spaced along and embrace the wires I30 and I32, which arrangement has been found to be quite satisfactory, as the hog rings may be readily applied and removed as required. To fasten the seat cushion I6 to the frame I0 a suitable number of clamp bolts I36 are provided along the supporting flange I4 and enga e over the wires I30 and I32 to remFvablv fasten the cushion I6 in place. If found desirable for added support, one or more coil springs I49 may be positioned between the upper and lower portion of the end springs 98 and I00. This is likewise true with respect to the end springs 34 and 36 in the cushion 22.

With particular attention to Fig. 1, it will be apparent that the spring structure of the cushion I6 is solely supported by the support afiorded its outer edge portions by the continuous flange I4.

As a result, the entire central portion of the spring structure is free to deflect into the open base I0. This arrangement not only gives what I have chosen to call a bottomless seat but it also permits the free circulation of air into the ported base I0 and into the interior of the spring structure of the seat cushion I6.

, Another desirable characteristic of the spring structure of the cushions I6 and 22 resides in the fact that the spring structure is of the same contour and dimensions before and after trimming. Also, of equal importance is the fact that the spring structure made up from the transverse loop springs and the compression coil springs, together with the longitudinal spacing elements, constitutes its own supporting frame structure and does not require any auxiliary frame structure, as has been the practice 'heretofore in automobile cushions. For example, as will be clear from Fig. 6, the coil springs 96 tie adjacent portions 92 and 94 together by being hog ringed at I42 to each other. The undulations in the adjacent springs 92 and 94 are preferably in opposed relation so that by placing the hog rings at the apexes, shifting of the'springs 24 and 90 is obviated.

In Figs. 9, 10 and 11 are shown several modified forms of the invention, in which the springs corresponding to the coilsprings 30 and 96 have been omitted from the spring structure and other means provided for tying the transverse loop springs together and affording adequate support to the padding. The construction of Fig. 9 is substantially that of Fig. 6 with'the coil springs 96 and I40 omitted. In lieu thereof close wound helical springs I44 connected at opposite ends have been used to provide a supporting surface for the padding in the plane of the upper portions 92 of the springs 90. The springs I44 also function to control the action of the portions 92 and tie the same into a more unitary supporting framework. As shown, the springs I44 are only associated with the upper portions 92 of the springs 90. It is anticipated, however, that it might be desirable in some cases to similarly associate the springs I44 with the lower portions 94, particularly where the spring structure is relatively thin, so that the portions 92 will be defiected in normal use to the point of engagement with the portions 94. With such an arrangement, a suitable pad or the like would be inserted between the portions 92 and 94 to eliminate noise. In the modification of Fig. 10 the mat. I26 of mattress wire of Fig. 6 has been extended over the upper surface of the spring structure to provide a mat I46. As in the case of the mat I26,

the mat I46 is preferably woven from spring wire to impart resiliency to the structure. Control is afforded the portions 92 of the springs by hog ringing the same at I48 to the mat I46. Additional hog rings I50 support the mat I46 on the spring structure. The mat I46 supports the padding, spaces the spring portions 92', and because of the fact that it is woven from spring wire affords substantial resilient support to the spring structure. The springs I52 of Fig. 11 correspond to the springs except for a slightly modified shape of undulation. which is particularly adaptable to the arrangement of the closely wound helical springs I54. The springs I54 correspond to and serve a function similar to the springs I44 of Fig. 9.

In Fig. 12 springs 90 are shown spaced by and suspended from hour glass shaped coil springs I56 of well known construction in lieu of the covered coil type 30 and 96.

In Fig. 13 the spring structure of Fig. 9 is shown without the springs I44. Such a construction may be used where an extremely inexpensive seat is desired. Burlap and the like may be used to support the padding upon the upper portions of the spring 90. Also a suitable elongated padding I56, as indicated in dotted outline in Fig. 15, may be inserted between the upper and lower portions 92 and 84 of the springs 90 to eliminate noise that may be caused by these portions contacting each other upon extreme deflection of the portions 92. The padding will also function in a manner similar to the springs 30 and 96 in that a supporting load on the portions 92 upon deflection would be transmitted to the portions 94 as the padding is compressed. Such a pad may be like thatdisclosed in copending application Serial No. 206,565, filed May 7, 1938, by

adapted to the seat cushion. In Fig. 1'1 loops I58 and I60 are provided. at the front and rear to soften the front and rear portions of the spring element. As more-clearly shown in Fig. 18, the upper and'lower undulated portions I62 and I66 of thespring elements I68 are out of phase with one another so that the lower portions I66 will offer 'a more reliable foundation for the absorption of a portion of the supported load upon substantial deflection of the upper portions I62. For increasing the pliability and regulating the feel and degree of support afforded to the occupant, numerous loops and return bends may be incorporated into the fabrication of the tension spring element. In Fig. 19 loops I10 and I12 are formed in the upper and lower portions I14 and I16. The number and location of these loops may be varied depending upon what results are desired. In Fig. 20 the loop I18 is located in the corner of the spring element, while the loop I80 is elongated to project the hinge point. further inwardly than the loop I58, for example, of Fig. 17. With the same gauge wire the loop I80 wouldprovidea softer front' portion than the loop I58. A departure from the closed transverse loop spring is shown in Fig. 21, in which the spring element I82 has its ends I84 and I86 secured to a support upon a relatively rigid composite sheet metal and fibre tacking frame with'a crimping flange I88. An enlarged loop I90 is provided at the front of the spring element, which produces a more yielding Such a front construction affords support for the padding and a possible elimination of the mat I26 of Fig. 6. Along somewhat similar lines is a modification of Fig. 24, in which the compression spring portion I96 has been coiled as an integral to construct the spring structure of the back.

cushion 22. Integral with the portions 202 and 204 are top and bottom portions 206 and 208 of the same general zig-zag construction as the front portion I94 of Fig. 23. Inthis-manner a pliable back and lower edge of the back cushion may be obtained. As should be readily appreciated, the length and .sharpness of bend of the zig-zag portion may be varied to increase or decrease the pliability with the same gauge wire.

In lieu of coiling the spring I96 integrally with the loop spring portions I98 and-200, the coil springs 2III (see 1igs.'28 and 29) may be separately coiled and the ends 2I2 and 2 of the loop spring portions 2I6 and 2I8 suitably clipped to the upper and .lower convolutions.

The foregoing description has treated separately the spring structures of the seat cushion I6 and the back cushion 22, including the nu- Y merous modified forms of the spring elements front with the same gauge wire and a more reof the loop spring element for use in the seat cushion I6 .is shown in Fig. 23. The front portion I84 has been softened and rendered more pliable by zig-zagging the wire back and forth.

thereof. This has been done more as a matter of convenience than for any other reason and in view of the fact that the spring structure of each cushion is of substantially the same general construction and in some cases may be substantially identical as well as being interchangeable. Moreover, in the numerous forms -of the invention illustrated, various ways are shown for securing the desired characteristics of support, pliability, resiliency, etc. In some forms of the invention two different methods are used in a single spring element, as, for example, in Fig. 24 a loop has been used at one end and an integral coil spring used at the other end of the loop spring element. Obviously, gauge of wire, support required and other variables enter into the design of the cushion construction and will result in combinations being selected other than those illustrated. Accordingly, I do not wish to be limited to the specific-constructions shown but desire to claim the novel features of the invention as broadly as they are defined in the annexed claims.

I claim:

1-. A spring structure designed to be upholstered comprising a marginal seat frame having a generally open central portion, aplurality of transversely extending longitudinally spaced springs formed from resilient wire and generally shaped as elongated fiat loops with the fiat sides thereof defining the upper and lower surfaces of the spring structure, longitudinally extending spacing members secured to said springs along the longitudinal edges of the. spring structure, coil springs extending between the flattened sides of said loops, the terminal convolutions of said coil springs being disposed in the planes of said flattened sides, and means clipping the adjacent flattened sides to said terminal convolutions. whereby said transverse springs are spaced in said spring structure and all of said springs tied together into a unit, said first named sprin s being supported adjacent the ends thereof by said marginal frame.

2. A spring structure designed to be' upholstered comprising a marginal seat frame, a plurality of spaced springs formed from resilient 3. The combination with a seat frame havin a marginal supporting surface for a seat cushion and a generally open central portion bridged by the cushion, of an upholstered cushion spring structure having marginal support upon said seat frame supporting surface, said spring structure comprising a plurality of spaced upright springs formed from resilient wire and generally shaped as elongated flattened loops with the upper and lower flattened sides thereof deflning the upper and lower surfaces of the spring structure, said springs being supported adjacent their ends in said frame, means for spacing and supporting said springs in their upright position so as to provide a self-contained spring structure, and resilient supporting means interposed between said flattened sides for transferring a portion of the load to the lower flattened sides; deflecting the same between the points of marginal support of the springs upon deflection of said upper sides.

'4. The combination with a seat frame havin a marginal supporting surface for a seat cushion and a generally open central portion bridged by said cushion, of an upholstered spring structure adapted to be directly supported upon said seat frame, said cushion having marginal support with said seat frame supporting surface, the central portion of said spring structure bridgin the open central portion of said seat frame. a plurality of spaced spring members comprising spaced upper and lower resilient spring wire portions disposed in planes generally parallel to the supporting surface of the cushion, said lower portions bridgin the central opening in said seat frame and having marginal support-upon said seat frame, and means interposed between said upper and lower portions for resiliently supporting a portion of the supported load upon said upper portions upon deflection of the latter and functioning to transmit a portion of Said load to saidlower members to'deflectthe sameinto the 5. The combination with a seat frame having a marginal supporting surface and a central opening into which the cushionlspring structure may be deflected, of 'a relatively thin upholstered cushion spring structure having marginal support upon the supporting surface of said seat frame with the central portion of said cushion spring structure bridging the central opening of said seat frame, said cushion spring structure comprising upper and lower spring elements deflning the supporting surfaces thereof, said lower elements having marginal support upon said seat frame, and means interposed between said upper and lower elements for transferring a deflecting load from said upper elements to said lower elements, whereby the latter are deflected by said load into the central opening of said frame.

6. The combination with a seat frame having a marginal supporting surface for a seat cushion and a generally open central portion bridged by said cushion into which said cushion may defleet, of an upholstered cushion spring structure having marginal support upon said seat frame supporting surface, said spring structure comprising a plurality of transversely extending elongated spring elements in the form of flattened loops of substantiallength, the flattened sides of said spring elements being undulated in a surface gerierally parallel to the supporting surface of the cushion spring structure, longitudinally extending spacing and bracing wires for said.

spring elements tying the same into a unitary self-supporting structure, and coiled compression springs having the terminal convolutions thereof disposed in the planes of said flattened sides, and means clipping said convolutions between opposed undulations of said sides.

I. The combination with a seat frame having a marginal supporting surface for a seat cushion and a generally open central portion bridged by I spring elements in the form offlattened loops,

of substantial length, the flattened sides of said spring elements being in a surface generally parallel tothe supporting surface of the cushion spring structure, longitudinally extending spacing and bracing wires for said spring elements tying the same into a unitary self-supporting structure, and coiled compression springs having the terminal convolutions thereof disposed in the planes of said flattened sides, and means clipping said convolutions to said sides.

, CLAIR S. REED.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2586013 *Oct 18, 1947Feb 19, 1952John M DortonCombined spring seat and back structure
US2644509 *Mar 13, 1945Jul 7, 1953Dorton John MFloating motion cushion for vehicles and furniture
US2649895 *Nov 16, 1949Aug 25, 1953Stubnitz Greene Spring CorpSeat back spring
US2675065 *Aug 14, 1948Apr 13, 1954Chrysler CorpSpring cushion structure
US2682296 *Nov 16, 1949Jun 29, 1954Stubnitz Greene Spring CorpSeat bottom spring
US2685329 *May 10, 1949Aug 3, 1954Stubnitz Greene Spring CorpSeat spring
US2783479 *Nov 6, 1953Mar 5, 1957Bartolucci Edgar OCouch-bed
US2871922 *Jan 26, 1956Feb 3, 1959Stubnitz Greene CorpVehicle cushion construction
US2886311 *Apr 28, 1955May 12, 1959American Metal ProdSpring construction
US3025102 *Nov 25, 1957Mar 13, 1962Hyland C FlintSeat construction
US6173464 *May 7, 1999Jan 16, 2001L&P Property Management CompanyPocketed bedding or seating product
US6272706Oct 16, 2000Aug 14, 2001L&P Property Management CompanyBedding or seating product having bands of springs
WO2000045676A1 *Jan 28, 2000Aug 10, 2000L & P Property Management CompanyPocketed bedding or seating product
Classifications
U.S. Classification267/86, 5/267
International ClassificationA47C7/35, B60N2/70
Cooperative ClassificationB60N2/7064, A47C7/347
European ClassificationA47C7/34F, B60N2/70W4C3B