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Publication numberUS2266075 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1941
Filing dateNov 18, 1936
Publication numberUS 2266075 A, US 2266075A, US-A-2266075, US2266075 A, US2266075A
InventorsD. B. Replogle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction cleaner
US 2266075 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1941 B. REPLOGLE 2,266,075

SUCTION CLEANER Filed Nov. 18, 1936 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sm'rcn m FLuQz Tool. OUTLET D 5 REP/.OGLE, 7% m' D. B. REPLQGLE 2,266,075

$UCTION CLEANER Filed NOV. 18, 1936 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Dec. 16, 1941.

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p. a. REPLOGLE sucwron CLEANER Filed Nov. 18 1936 e Sheets-She et 4 1 1 1. D. B. REPLOGLE 2,266,015

SUCTION CLEANER I Filed NOV. 18, 1936 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 D. 5. fPEPLOGLE,

Patented Dec. 16, 1941 SUCTION CLEANER Daniel Benson Replogle, Berkeley, Calif., assignor to The Ohio Citizens Trust Company, Toledo, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio, as trustee Application November 18, 1936, Serial No. 111,518

9 Claims.

The invention relates to cleaning apparatus and more particularly to portable electric cleaners of the type adapted to be selectively used for floor cleaning purposes or for cleaning walls, draperies and the like.

One of the features of my invention is the provision of a floor tool pivotally and removably connected to the cleaner body, which latter is in itself an organized cleaner, capable of efficient cleaning action independent of the floor tool, which tool may then serve simply as a wheeled carriage by means of which the cleaner may be moved to and fro.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide the floor tool with a pair of revolving members or brushes, either of which may be brought into operation as a propelling factor by simply tilting the floor tool forwardly or rearwardly about a pair of supporting end rollers, the other brush performing the beating or brushing operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide the cleanerbody with a rigid suction handle portion which may be used for moving the cleaner to and fro on its wheeled carriage or may be employed as a gripping portion to aid in removing the air filtering element or elements from the body of the cleaner when such elements have become fouled with dust.

The invention also contemplates improvements in details of construction of the cleaner parts, allof which parts however coact in the improvementof the organized assembly or combination.

- The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawings and the further detailed description in which are set forth,'for the purpose of illustration but not by way of limitation, an operative embodiment of the inventive thought.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the assembled cleaner, parts being shown in section.

Fig. 2 is a detail sectional view on a larger scale on the line 22 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a top plan View of the cleaner on a smaller scale.

Figs. 4 and 5 are fragmentary side views largely diagrammatic in character illustrating the tilting, of the floor tool forwardly and rearwardly about its end rollers.

- Fig. 6 is an exploded view showing various elements at the upper portion of the body of the cleaner, shown separately for the purpose of illustrating details of construction.

larger scale than the previous figures.

Fig. 10 is a view partly in section on line Iii-I 0 of Fig. 9, parts of the cleaner body being shown in side elevation.

Fig. 11 is a detail section on line H-ll of Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 is a detail showing a portion of one end of the brush chamber, and illustrating the adjustable brush mounting.

Fig. 13 is a detail showing a brush shaft end bearing.

Fig. 14 is a perspective view showing the removable rubber sealing skirt or rim for the bottom of the brush chamber.

Fig. 15 is a view showing the lower portion of the power plant housing, including the laterally projecting discharge pipes.

Fig. 16 is a plan view illustrating the apparatus functioning as a blower.

Fig. 17 is a wiring diagram of the electrical elements employed in the system.

Fig. 18 is a detail sectional view showing one of the supporting end rollers.

Fig. l9is a perspective view of a roller bearing.

Fig. 20 is a detail view showing the controlling elements for the brush motor.

Fig. 21 is a detail view of a removable partition which separates the fan belt chamber from the brush chamber.

Fig. 22 is a View similar to Fig. 10 showing a modification wherein the brush chamber is equipped with a trash box.

Fig. 23 is a view partly in section on line 23--23 of Fig. 22 and partly in elevation.

Fig. 24 is a detail View of the trash box.

My cleaning apparatus preferably includes two principal parts, a cleaner body A and a carriage or floor tool B to which the cleaner body is pivotally connected. The cleaner body may include a housing for the suction producing power plant and air filter, and may be provided with a rigid suction handle, extension pipes and suitable tools for cleaning walls, draperies and the like. The floor tool may serve as a wheeled carriage upon which the cleaner body is mounted, and by means of which it may be moved to and fro by the handle with which the cleaner body is equipped aided by power driven means carried by the floor tool. The carriage is preferably in the form of a floor tool which may be placed in communication with the suction pipe of the cleaner body, and the act of attaching the suction pipe serves to close a switch which energizes a motor for actuating a pair of brushes within a floor tool.

The floor tool is tiltingly mounted and when the rear of the tool is relieved of the weight of the cleaner body the forward rotating element or brush is brought into propelling relation with the floor tool as illustrated in Fig. 4, while when the weight of the body rests on the rear of the tool as illustrated in Fig. 5, the rear rotating element comes into operative propelling engagementwith the floor or floor covering.

The cleaner body As shown the body of the cleaner includes a cylindrical housing or caddy l8 which may be' composed of metal, Bakelite, hard fiber or other suitabl material. At the lower end of the hous ing is mounted a power plant ll comprising a motor and fan elements. driven thereby. The power plant produces suction at one end and discharges air under pressure at theother. A removable cap l2 may be provided at the discharge end having an outlet pipe l3 which is provided with two lateral discharge outlets I4, each of which may be of the sam effective area as the pipe l3. These lateral pipes or horns; are provided with ridges [5 over which releasable clamps I6 carried by the floor tool B are closed, to pivotally connect the body of the cleaner to the floor tool, or carriage. Either of the outlets may be closed by means of a plug or the like II, while the, other may be provided with a blower hose as illustrated in Fig. 16 so that the apps.-

ratus may function as a vblower.

The dust collecting and air filtering elements are mounted in the upper portion of the housing l0. Any suitable filtering apparatus may be employed wtihin. the broad scope of the invention, but as shown I employ a composite filter including an inner paper dust collector bag and an outer coarse mesh element 2| which prevents contact between the innerbag' and thewall of th housing, thus permitting free passage of air. I I

For making the dust collector bag I may employ a blank such as illustrated at X in Fig. 7, andv which may be cut. tocircular form, and cupped and fluted as illustrated in 8-. The fluted portions serve to insure free passage of air through thebag. The cleaner bag 20 may be connected to funnel shaped member 22 which is preferably provided with a coarse me's'h filtering element 23 extending across the mouth thereof which may beused for cleaning small solid. articles such as grain, type and thelike. and

one side of the cap there is provided an inlet 25- for dust laden 'air with which inlet a rigid suction pipe 26 communicates, which member is adapted to serve as ahandle for propelling the cleaner across the floor and also as a; grip portion for removing the cap assembly together with the inner dust collecting-bag secured thereto.

The outer bag may remain within the caddy, or in some cases both the cloth and paper bags may be withdrawn together. It is also within the scope of my invention to employ a cloth bag in place of the paper bag, altho the paper bag is preferred. The curved portion of the suction handle may be provided with a detachable straight extension portion 35 secured in operative relation thereto.

A bracket 21 carried by the cap rigidly supports the suction pipe 26 and releasable fastening members 28 may be employed for normally securing the cap to the caddy. or housing so that the apparatus may be moved to and fro across the floor.

The cap assembly is provided with a transparent top 29 permitting the operator to view the interior thereof and see the amount of dust which is being drawn into the cleaner. A small ante-chamber 30 may be provided at one side of the cap in which is mounted a lamp 3! serving to illuminate the interior of the cap and thusv cooperate with the transparent top. The lamp may be supplied from any suitable source of current by means of a plug 32. An eitension of the conduit supplying the lamp supplies the electric motor of the power plant I l, and a switch 3-1v on the handle extension may be employed for controlling the current to boththe lamp and the motor.

A flexible hose extension 36. of any desired length may be attached to the member 35 or may be attached directly to the handle 26. It will also be understood that the member 26 and the extension 35 may together be considered as constituting the handle of th cleaner. The hose may be provided with suitable toolsfor cleaning walls, ceilings; furniture and the like; may be of such length as to extend to any part of the roomandextension members may be employed where desired.

The cleaner may be supported at an angle of approximately 45 degrees to. the horizontal by resting the lower portion on the rear of the wheeled carriage or floor tool B as illustrated in Fig. 1 and may be easily moved to any desired location. The cleaner may be held upright to increase its height, being swingable with reference to the door tool owing to the pivoted; connection.

The floor tool As previously set forth the portion of the apparatus generally designated by the reference letter B may serve the combined function of a wheeledcarriage for the cleaner body and of a floor tool which may be connected at will to the air filter and suction producing means through the-instru mentality of the suction pipe with which the cleaner is equipped.

As shown the floor tool includes an open mouthed casing 40 which constitutes a suction nozzle and brush chamber. The casing is best illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10. A slot 4| at the upper portion of the chamber communicates with a turbinated suction chamber '42, having an outlet 43 for dust laden air, into which the end 31 of the hose pipe 36 is adapted to be inserted to connect the floor tool withthe air filter and source of suction. The clamps 16 which detachably secure the floor tool to the fan discharge outlets M of the cleaner body are shown as mounted on arcuate brackets. secured to the top cfthe floor tool casing.

At the rear of i the floor tool casin'g, at the end of the tool opposite the outlet and balancing The hosethe same, thereis secured. a small electric brush drivingtmotor .45. This motor is adapted to be automatically supplied with current when the end 31 of the suction pipe 361s inserted in the outlet pipe 43, and is adapted to be automatically cut-off when such pipe is removed. AS shown, the motor is suppliedwith current from a conduit 46 which may be an extension of the wire that supplies the fan motor, and in which conduit is included a normally open switch 41 secured adjacent the outlet pipe 43, and as shown includes a spring cam finger 48 adapted to be engaged by the end 31 of the hose pipe as the same is inserted in thepipe 43, this cam finger serving to close the contacts of the switch thereby The motor 45 may be employed to drive a pair brush through a belt 50 which connects the pulley 5| on the end of the motor shaft 52 with a pulley 53 on the end of the rotating member 49. The front rotating member 49 may be driven from the rear member by means of a belt 54, herein shown as crossed, so thatthe two rotating members 49 may be driven in opposite directions. As shown the end chambers 55 which house the pulleys and belts; and which maybe termed belt chambers, are separated by partitions 56, 56 from the intermediate portion of the brush chamber, the partitions being provided with notches 51, 51 to fit the rotating elements v49, 49. As shown a cap 58 is provided at the rear of one of the belt chambers, opposite the driving pulley 5|, the cap fitting an opening large enough to permit the pulley to be inserted or withdrawn therethrough. The motor 45 isYadapted to be reversed end for end so that the brushes may be driven in either direction as desired. The rotating members 49 being preferably identical a description of one will apply to the other also. As shown the rotating member constitutes a body or holder for tufts of bristles 60 inserted therein in straight or in spiral rows as desired. The brush body may be of wood or other suitable material. The bristles are preferably comparatively stiff so as to exert a substantial propelling action when forcibly brought into contactwith the floor or floor covering. Each brush holder is rotatably mounted on a fixed shaft 61 through the medium of anti-friction bearings 62 located. near the ends of the shaft and at intermediate locations also if desired. Each end bearing may be formed of two halves as illustrated in. Fig. .13, with internal. pockets 63 for graphite on. similar lubricant whereby the bearings are made squeak proof. 'The bearings may be composed of anti-friction impregnated Wood or other suitable material and may be forced into the ends of the brush body and over the'ends of the fixed shaft. Each hub may be held in place by a key 64 fitting over a key-way 65 on the shaft 6|, a washer 66 being also employed.

Each end 61 of the shaft BI is flattened to fit in a rectangular slot68 in a resilient holder plate 69, secured to the end wall of the tool but bulging away therefroml intermediate its ends whereby the shaft may be pressed into place and held by the resilience of .the holding plate. The holding plates may beadj'us-te'd to bring the brush carried plate and very accurate adjustment of the height of the brush may thus be obtained.

The casin 46 which houses the brushes is shown as mounted on end rollers I3, 13, rotating about an axis which passes between the two brushes. One of the rollers is shown in Figs. 18 and 19 and includes an outer rubber tire member secured to a two-part hub 14 preferably composed of anti-friction material such as grease impregnated wood, and which may be provided with internal graphite cups 15. The hub rotates about a spindle 16 which is secured to a side wall of the casing. By means of a pair of such rollers the casing is normally supported above the floor.

Secured at the rear of the brush casing is mounted a resilient bracket member 11 which may be provided with end rollers 18 similar to the rollers 73. The bracket member may be of spring steel and its function is to cook or tilt the brush casing forward about the axis of the rollers 13, thereby bringing the front brush into propelling engagement with the floor or floor covering. The effect of this bracket may be overcome by allowing the weight of the cleaner body to rest upon the rear of the fioor tool, whereupon the fioor tool will be tilted rearwardly and the rear brush brought into propelling engagement with the floor or floor covering. Obviously by adjusting the normal height of the brushes by means of the adjustable end plates between which the brushes are mounted, the frictional engagement of either brush upon the floor may be varied as desired.

To provide a seal for the floor tool a beaded flexible rim or skirt is employed, which fits around the lower portion of the brush casing. This skirt may be of rubber or other suitable material. The rim or skirt also serves as a bumper or buffer member to prevent marring various objects with which the tool may come in contact during the cleaning operation. Fiber lips 8i may be provided at the front and rear of the skirt, such lips providing between them end openings 82 through which air may be drawn into the cleaner in a fiat stream. The rim may be notched at 83 to allow for the shanks 16 of the supporting rollers 13. By the use of the flexible rim or skirt a seal may be maintained at all times regardless of whether the tool is tilted forwardly as in Fig. 4 or rearwardly as in Fig. 5, the rim simply bulging at the front or rear as the case may be as it is pressed against the floor when the tool is tilted in one direction or the other.

In Fig. 22 there is shown a modification in which the brush chamber is equipped with a trash box 85 arranged centrally between the two brushes and provided with lugs 86 adapted to extend into pits in the side walls of the tool as indicated in Fig. 23. The box is shown in detail in Fig. 24. Screen 81 may be inserted in the outlet pasage leading to the turbinating suction chamber 42, to prevent large objects from being drawn through the suction pipe. Such particles will then fall into the trash box. The trash box may be readily removed by simply pulling downwardly on the box whereupon the flexible lugs 86 will be withdrawn from the side walls;

The function of the trash'box is to catch litter such as cigarette stubs, nut shells and the like which may be thrown upward by the brushes and need not reach the sanitary dust bag. By the use of the trash box attachment the bag may function properly as a sanitary article for a longer period before removal is necessary than would otherwise be permissible. Coins or jewelry may also be salvaged by reason of the screen 81. Both the box and screen however are optional. The box may have two lugs on each end if desired or one broad lug'so as to prevent it from being too easily tilted sidewise.

Operation The invention has been described in detail for the purpose of illustration and from such description the extreme flexibility of operation of the device as a whole will be apparent. The cleaner may be operated-with the floor tool B serving merely as a wheeled carriage, in which carriage the body portion itself constitutes a selfcontained cleaner which may be moved from place to place and any suitable cleaning tools applied at the end of the hose pipe 35. The amount of dust entering the cleaner may at all times be observed and when fouled the dust collector may be readily removed and emptied or replaced, depending on the type of dust collector employed.

When it is desired to use the carriage as a floor tool, this is rendered operative simply by inserting the end 31 of the suction hose in the outlet pipe 43 of the tool. By then operating the switch 34 the entire electrical equipment, including the fan motor, the electric lamp which illuminates the incoming dust, and the motor which actuates the propelling members 49, 49 are energized.

By resting the weight of the cleaner upon the rear of the floor tool the rear brush may be caused to function as the propelling factor, while the front brush may be adjusted so as to lightly engage the surface to be cleaned and thus perform a beating or brushing function. On the other hand, by raising the cleaner body, tilting the same about the floor tool, the front brush will be forced into propelling engagement with the floor by means of the resilient bracket, thus tending to move the apparatus in the direction opposite to that caused by the rear brush, while at the same time the rear brush may serve as a. beating or brushing factor. It will also be apparent that by simply reversing the driving motor 45, end for end, the direction in which the respective brushes are rotated may likewise be reversed.

While it is ordinarily intended that the revolving members 49, 49 should be inoperative when the floor tool is disconnected from its source of suction, it will be apparent that if desired these devices could be employed as propelling members even when the end of the suction pipe 31 is not in place by simply short-circuiting the contacts of the motor switch 41 thus rendering the brushes operative. v

Other modifications and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art, and may be resorted 'to without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A suction cleaner including a cylindrical housing or caddy containing suction producing means, a pair of laterally extending discharge pipes communicating with the suction producing means, a floor tool detachably and hingedly connected to said lateral discharge pipes, and means for selectively placing the suction producing means in communication with the floor tool.

2. A suction cleaner including suction producing means, having a pair of lateral outlet pipes and a floor tool hingedly connected to said outlet pipes, and means for selectively placing the suction producing means in communication with the floor tool.

3. A suction cleaner including a cylindrical housing containing suction producing means, a pair of laterally extending discharge pipes communicating with the suction producing means, and a wheeled under-carriage supporting the housing and detachably and hingedly connected to the said lateral discharge pipes.

4. The combination of a wheeled floor tool having an inlet mouth and an outlet pipe; with an organized suction cleaner comprising a rigid housing containing suction producing means and air filtering means, means for mounting said rigid housing upon said floor tool, and a flexible suction pipe operatively connected at one end to said air filtering means while its other end is adapted to be selectively connected to the outlet pipe of said floor tool to render said floor tool operative, or disconnected from said outlet pipe and used separately from the floor tool for independent cleaning purposes, an agitator within said floor tool, means for actuating said agitator 7 and means automatically controlling said actuating means according as the suction pipe is connected to or disconnected from said suction pipe.

5. The combination of a wheeled floor tool having an inlet mouth and an outlet pipe; with an organized suction cleaner comprising a rigid housing containing suction producing means and air filtering means, means for mounting said rigid housing upon said floor tool, and a flexible suction pipe operatively connected at one end to the air filtering means while its other end is adapted to be selectively connected to the outlet pipe of said floor tool to render said floor tool operative, or disconnected from said outlet pipe and used separately from the floor tool for independent cleaning purposes, an agitator within said floor tool, and motor means for actuating said agitator and means automatically controlling said actuating means according as the suction pipe is connected to or disconnected from said suction pipe.

6. A suction cleaner including suction producing means having a pair of lateral discharge pipes, an under-carriage for said cleaner hingedly connected to said outlet pipes, and including a floor tool, having an inlet mouth and an outlet pipe, and a suction conduit communicating at one end with the suction producing means, its other end being selectively connectible to the outlet pipe of said floor tool.

7. A suction cleaner including suction producing means having a pair of lateral discharge pipes, and under-carriage for said cleaner hingedly connected to said outlet pipes, and including a floor tool, having an inlet mouth and an outlet pipe, and a suction conduit communicating at one end with the suction producing means, its other end being selectively connectible to the outlet pipe of said floor tool, agitating means within said floor tool, means including an electric motor for actuating said agitating means, and means automatically controlling said actuating means according as said suction conduit is connected to or disconnected from said floor tool outlet.

8. The combination of an organized suction cleaner capable of eifective cleaning operation independent of its floor tool, comprising a rigid tubular housing containing a suction producing power plant and air filtering means, and a suction pipe communicating at one end with said housing; of an undercarriage supporting the cleaner, comprising a wheeled floor tool pivotally connected to said housing, said floor tool including a nozzle having an outlet adapted to be selectively connected to or disconnected from said air filtering means by means of said suction pipe,

agitating means within the nozzle, and actuating 7 means therefor controlled by the position of said suction pipe.

9. The combination of an organized suction cleaner capable of efiective cleaning operation independent of its floor tool, comprising a rigid tubular housing containing a suction producing power plant and air filtering means, and a suction pipe communicating at one end with said housing; of an undercarriage supporting the cleaner, comprising a wheeled floor tool pivotally connected to said housing, said floor tool including a nozzle having an outlet adapted to be selectively connected to or disconnected from said air filtering means by means of said suction pipe, said cleaner housing having a pair of oppositely projecting lateral discharge outlets, and means carried by said floor tool for detachably and pivotally connecting said floor tool to said outlet pipes.

DANIEL BENSON REPLOGLE.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/335, 55/381, 15/52.1, 362/91, 15/384, 15/349, 15/377, 15/412
International ClassificationA47L5/26, A47L5/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/26
European ClassificationA47L5/26