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Publication numberUS2266126 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1941
Filing dateJul 19, 1939
Priority dateFeb 10, 1939
Publication numberUS 2266126 A, US 2266126A, US-A-2266126, US2266126 A, US2266126A
InventorsJob F Malsbary, Walter W Taylor
Original AssigneeJob F Malsbary, Walter W Taylor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 2266126 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 16, 1941.

J. F. MALSBARY ET AL PUMP Original Filed Feb. 10, 1939 v AT ORNEYS Patented Dec. 16, 194

Job F. Malsbary and Walter W. Taylor, Oakland, Calif.

Original application February 10, 1939, Serial No.

13 Claims.

This application embodies divisional subject matter taken from our copending application, Serial Number 255,636, filed February 10th, '1939, for Pumps.V

Our pump is particularly intended for use in connection with cleaning machines for motor vehicles or the like inwhich a liquid compound is pumped in a dilute form, which may be one pound of cleansing material to flfty gallons of water, usually under high pressure, .through a heating coil and a nozzle from which the compound is ejected in the form of a spray which may be of different characteristics depending upon the results desired and suitable adjustment of various contributing factors.

Heretofore it has been customary to mix the various liquids with different materials that form -Y the compound before they pass through one single intake valve of the pump, either in, a mixing tank or by feeding from different sources of supply into a common conduit leading to the intake valve of the pump.

Certain compounds, desirable for use in connection With apparatus ofthe type, When thus mixed to a dilute condition prior to their passing Vthrough the inlet valve, have a gumming eifect created on the surface of the valve and seat which `tends to seal shut the intake valve, thereby rendering the pump ineffective or inoperative because the vacuum created on the suction stroke of the pump is insufficient to pull the valve free from its seat.

This effect is not so noticeable in connection with the delivery valvebecause the high Vpressure available in the pump renders this factor negligible. The vacuum formed by liquid pump suction is a maximum of 14.7 pounds per square inch to act on the valve area for openingrthe valve. If the inlet valve does not open, the pump Will not fill with liquid.

Referring to the mixture of Aliquids to be Y pumped out of the pump, it should be, for practical purposes, diluted to a strength of one Apound of cleaning compound to fty gallons of Water. It should be understood that some of the materials referred to in various supply tanks do not form a gumming substance on the intake .valve seats when pumped.

Certain new improved developments 1in the cleaning compound industry are made up of materials that clean surfaces very-rapidly and tend Ito make the cleaning gun operate smoothly and to smother out obnoxious odors of other cleaning agents. But the method of application has been uncertain and troublesome. Therefore the Divided and this application July 19, 1939, Serial No. 285,335 Y herein described method of -use has Vbeen developed to -create economical and dependable methods of -using these products.

We have discovered that a more concentrated mixture of say, one pound of cleaning-compound to ten gallons of Water has a dissolving and softeningV effect on the materialfthat passes through the inlet valve seats, thereby preventing the valve from sticking to the seat.y

To get this concentrated solution'intoY the pump through the separate intake valvesr and to -make it work satisfactory, we operate as folvalve.

lows: Y

We provide one separate inlet valve onv the pump for this specialV concentrated solutionY and a'needle control valve in the'pipe linebetween the concentrated solution tank and the solution inlet valve to the pump. Another tank is to supply Water to the pump Ythrough another inlet TheA pump will` suck a full cylinder-.of liquid at eachstroke of the plungen Now We Wish to mix some solution in with lthe Water that is going into the pump at each stroke and to make a dilute` mixture Within the pump.

So the needle control valve of the solution'is `opened a predetermined distance/tofeedin some p of theconcentrate'd liquid. A

Assuming, for instance, that We desire a dilute mixture within the pump of a strength of one lpound of compound to fifty gallon of Water; the

pump capacity-is fty gallons per hour; the concentrate solution strength is one pound Vvto ten gallons of water: then by opening the concentrate solution feed and combining ten gallons 'of concentrated solution with forty gallonscof water We have a dilute mixture of a strength ratio of one pound to fifty gallons o Water Within the i solution intake valve, andAplain Water face of the Water intake valve.A

pump. With this combination of mechanism We'.

have a concentrated solut1onV on the seat' ofV the o nthe Plain Water does not make the valve sticky and concentrated solution does not makev it sticky. Therefore We have periect operation of' the inlet ValVeS.

The concentratedv solution has been specified as one pound of material toten gallons of Water.

'lnis degree of concentration nas been given for easy demonstration of theprinclpleand as being -With entirely satisfactory results and use-through same and effecting a saving in maintenance ex v penses. It is apparent that the same principle may be applied to a number of pumps or cylinders placed side by side for convenience or ini-U crease of capacity. y

The individual liquids in a concentrate form entering the pump through individual valvesand Y entering into the other compounds under consideration do not have the gumming effect on the seat area of the valve, and it is thereforepro-` posed, in the present invention, to feed the inlgliividual liquids separately past the area of the intake valve seats before allowing them to mix.

The mixed liquid when re-circulating through the byepass relief valve Within vthe pump assembly,V as hereinafter described, Adoes not, come in contact with or pass through the regular intake valve seat area of the pump, because the liquid around the valve seat and valve chamber is self-dissolving or cleaning. l

This method of mixing the individual liquids b has the further advantage that the individual liquids remain under control of the operator until they enter the pump, with the result that themixture and its proportions can be changed almost immediately, if desired. It also prevents r settling out or separating o f certain ingredients of; the Acompound as often happens when; the ingredients, are mixed in a` tank. Since each tank has its own intake valveleading to the pump.,` the liquids will be preventedk from iiovving from one tank to another, even if the liquid levels shouldbe different in thetanks.

Then again it happens,A that, the compounds used in, connection with the apparatus under. discussion, comprise a plurality of constituents, two of which will only mix With the rest of them after they have first been mixed .with one another, and it is a further object of our invention, toprovide a pump in which a pluralityof ingredients4 are treated in such a manner that certain `Sub-groups are irstmixed individually while passingv through ,the pump and` that .the subrgroups are compounded. andA intermxed after passingv through therpump..

other c ases again, as in orchard sprays, it happens that certain solutions do no t remain mixedon `account of different specific gravities,

, or that it is desiredto pump smalllamounts of a solution into the Water line for spraying trees.

In, certain compounds someI of the ingredients are harmful to certain parts of the pump, as for instance, the packing in adouble-action pump,

V Whereas others may be beneficial, and it is a still further object of our invention to provide means for permitting such ingredients tov pass through the pumps in different and separate paths, whereby the harmful ingredients are kept from contact with sensitive" parts of the pump and beneficial ingredients are made available forfsu'ch parts, as lubricant, 'for instance.

' It is further'proposed' to combine with' the features set forth, means for re-circuliating a part orali ofthe rcompound throughfthe pump, as

a pressure relief means or Yduring idling periods;-or-for the purposelof-l more thoroughly-mix-- ing the ingredients. When the liquid is thus re-circulated and none is withdrawn into the system, it prevents any further intake from any of the supply tanks, and the re-circulated liquid is prevented from mixing with or back-fiowing into the supply tanks.

Further objects and advantages of our invention 'will appear as the specication proceeds and the novel features thereof will be set forth in the claims hereto appended.

The preferred form of our invention is illus -trated in the accompanying drawing, forming invention.

Referring to the drawing in detail, we provide a pump 40 in which the piston 4'I divides the pump housing into two suction and compression chambers 42 and 43 and is actuated for reciprocating motion by a rectilinearly moving rod 44 passing through a, packing 45. It will be noted that only one of the chambers has a packing While the end of the other chamber is closed.

In this apparatus five different tanks 45-50 or other sources of supply are shown as containing, by Way of example, a light soap solution, a caustic solution, kerosene, emulsion and water, all five of which are to be mixed in the nnal spray. But two problems offer themselves; rstly, the caustic soap would be harmful to the packing, Whereas the kerosene servesV as a lubricant and would be rather beneficial; and secondly, the kerosene will not readily mix With the caustic and soap solutions unless it has first been mixed with the emulsion.

The pumps take care of this situation by causing the kerosene and. the emulsion to rst. mix

and then enter the chamber l4.3 containing the KVpacking andby causing the caustic and soap solutions to rst mix and then enter the other orificesl 60 andV Ell. G5A

pump chamber 4,2 containing no packing. Water from thev tank enters freely through wide --open valves into both of the chambers to insure a-complete-filling of the pump chambers onA each piston stroke. On leaving the pump chambers both mixtures are brought together and are thoroughly. intermixedy for making the final compound outside the pump.

This i'sA accomplished by the following arrangement: Y

The tanks 46- and 4F!v are connected, through pipes-5| and 52, with inta-ke valves 53 and 54 connecting, through pipes and 55Witha manifold 51- which leads to thev pump chamber 42. The pipes 5I and 52 are'provided with suitable control valves 58v and 59- andwit-h restriction The pump chamber 42 discharges, through a delivery valve 62 into the pipeG-BWhicn empties tangentiallyv intov a cylindrical mixing chamber 64 having an axial -discharge into the pipe 65 connecting with the f conduit 66 leading tov theI system in whichv the pressure sa-fety'reliefvalveif. The pipe E5 is provided with an air-dome 69I having Aadrain Uvvalve 19, andthelconduit 65 is controlled by a suitable-valve "H;

ough mixing with the discharge from the Aother `pump and for final discharge into .theA conduit 66 as previously described. Y, The two manifolds 51 and *'18v areV interconnected through a pipe 85 havingv two intake valves 86 and B1 leading to the respective pump 1 chambers, and the pipe 85 connects, through pipe 88, with the water supply tank '53 having a suitable float control, as at 89. 'YA valve 90V controls the pipe 88. Thus water is always available in ample supply for both pump chambers, the intention being to insure complete filling of the pump chambers at all times, while at the same time carefully controlling the other ingredients.

The final discharge pipe 65 is connected, through a pressure relief valve 9| with a by-pass 92 which leads, through intake valvesn93 and 94 to the respective manifolds 51 andl'l and the pump chambers 42 and 43. 'Ihe by-passis provided with an air dome 92 and a drain valve 93 for the same.

The Valve 9| is subject to controlso that any desired portion or all of the liquid mixture may be re-circulated through the pump'for further mixing or through idling periods.

It is apparent that, with valve HV closed, all.

the liquid will re-circulate through the by-pass and no new liquid will be withdrawn from any of the tanks.

It also appears that all the intake valves for the separate tanks are remote from the re-circui lating path so that the valves remain unaffected by the re-circulating mixture.

We claim: I

1. In a double-acting pump, a cylinder, apis- Y ton reciprocating therein and forming two pump chambers therewith, separate intake valves for the two pump chambers and having valveless communication therewith, means for separately passing liquids through the intake valves tothe two pump chambers from diiferent sources,`v

pump, the said means being arranged to deliver the mixed liquid to the respective pump chambers without allowing the mixed liquids to come in contact with the intake valves.

2. In a double-acting pump, a cylinder, a piston reciprocating therein and forming two pump chambers therewith, separate intake valves for the two pump chambers and being disposed relatively remote from the pump chambers and having valveless communication therewith, means for separately passing liquids through the intake valves to the two pump chambers from different sources, means for mixing the liquids after delivery from the pump, and means operating under the delivery pressure of the pump for re-circulating a desired part of the mixed liquids through the pump, the said means being arranged to deliver the mixed liquid to the respective pump chambers without allowing the mixed liquids to come in contact with the intake valves.

3. In a machine of the character described, a

tion of the pumped liquid may be by-passed .alternatelyAY to one-and then the other of said housing, a piston reciprocable therein and forming two chambers therewith, each chamber alternating lwith the other in successively forming a suction and a compression'chamber, intake and :deliVeiy valves` for each chamber, means for lfeeding-liquidato the intake valves, a conduit connected to the delivery valves and having ltwo branchjcondruitsfrone being a working conduit andthe other-branch conduit being connected to both chambers of the housing, whereby a porchambers under the pressure of the opposite chamber. Y

4. In a machine of the character described, a housing, a piston reciprocable therein and forming two chambers therewith, each chamberalternating with the other in successively forming a suction and a compression chamber, intake and delivery valves for; each chamber, means vfor "V feedingliquids to the intake valves, a conduit connected tothe delivery valves and having two vbranch conduits, one being a working conduit and Vthe other vbranch conduit being connected to both chambers lof vthe hou'sing,` whereby .a portion of the pumped liquid may be by-passed alternately to. one and then the other of said chambers und-er the pressure vofthe opposite chamber, anda pressure relief valve controlling the workingbranch of the conduit for `limiting the pressure therein to a desired maximum and for diverting excess pressure into the by-pass conduit. c f

v5. In a machine of the character described, a

housing, a piston reciprocable therein and forming two chambers therewith, each chamber alternating with the other in successively forming a suction and a compression chamber, intake and ,delivery valves for each chamber, means for feeding liquidsto the intake Valves, a conduit connected to the delivery valves and .having two branch conduits, one vbeing a working conduit and the other branch conduit being connected Vchambers under the pressure ofthe opposite chamber, `the leypass conduit having an-intake Valve fon each chamber subject to controlby 50 the. pressurev tl're1ein..l

. 6`. In awmachine/of Ithe character described, a /mixer comprising a cylindrical housing having tangential inlets and an axial outlet, a doubleactinglfpump having two pump chambers,means for pumpingtwo liquid constituents through the `two chambers in 'separate paths, and conduit connectionsV between Vthe pump chambers land the tangential inlets of A.the mixer whereby the liquid constituents are forced through the mixer in a swirling movement under the pressure of the pump and are discharged therefrom as a homogeneous mixture without any substantial loss of pressure.

7. In a double-acting pump, a housing, a piston reciprocating therein and dividing the same into two chambers forming alternately suction and compression chambers respectively, an intake conduit for each chamber having an intake valve spaced from said chamber, a common fluid feed `for both of said conduits, a second conduit for each chamber and connected thereto between its intake valve and the pump chamber, an intake valve in each second conduit spaced from its connection with the rst conduit, means for feeding a iiuid through the second conduit,

'a'thfird conduit connected to each second conduit `between its intake valve and' itsv point of connection to the rst conduit, an intake valvefor each third conduit spaced from the second conduit, means for feeding a iiuid through each third conduit, an outlet for each chamber having a delivery valve therein, a mixing device having the outlet conduits connected thereto,a discharge conduit for the mixing device having two branch conduits, one being a Working conduit and the Yotherhaving by-pass conduits connected to the first intake conduits respectively between the -pump chambers, and the connections of the second intake conduits, an intake valve in each'bypass conduit spaced from its connection -to the 'first intake conduit, and a vpressure relief valve `for controlling the pressure in the Working conduit.

8. In a double-acting pump, a housing, a piston reciprocating therein and dividing the same into vtwo chambers forming alternately suction and compression chambers respectively, an intake conduit for each chamber having an intake valve spaced from said chamber, a common fluid feed for both of said conduits, a second conduit for each chamber and connected thereto between its intake valve and the pump chamber, an intake valve in each second conduit spaced from its connection with the rst conduit, means for feeding a fluid through the second conduit, an outlet for each chamber having a delivery valve therein, a mixing device having the outlet conduits connected thereto, a discharge conduit for the mixing device having two branch conduits, one being a working conduit and the other having by-pass conduits connecting to the first in- -take conduits respectively between the pump chambers and the connections of the second intake conduits, an intake valve in each by-pass conduit spaced from its connection to the rst intake conduit, and a pressure relief valve for controlling the pressure in the working conduit.

9. In a double-acting pump, a housing, a'piston reciprocating therein and dividing the same into two chambers forming alternately suction and compression chambers respectively, an intake conduit for each chamber having an intake valve spaced from said chambery a common fluid feed for both of said conduits, a second conduit for each intake conduit andconnected thereto between the intake valve and the pump chamber, van intake valve in each second yconduit spaced from its connection with the first conduit, means for feeding a fluid through each second conduit, and delivery valves for the pump chambers.

10. In a double-acting pump, a housing, a piston reciprocating therein and dividing the same into two chambers forming alternately suction and `compression chambers respectively, an intake conduit for each chamber having an intake 'valve' spaced from said chamber, means for feeding a fluid through both of said conduits, a delivery conduit for each chamber, and a by-pass conduit between the delivery conduits and the Apump chambers, the vby-pass connecting with the intake conduits and having an intake valve for each pump chamber,

1I. Ina double-acting pump, a housing, a pis- `ton reciprocable therein and dividing the same into two chmabers forming alternately suction and compression chambers respectively, jan intake conduit for each chamber having an intake valve spaced from said chamber, a common fluid feed for both of said conduits, an outlet for each chamber having a delivery valve therein, a mixing device having the outlet conduits connected thereto, a discharge conduit vfor the mixing'device having two branch conduits, one being a working conduit and the other having by-pass conduits connected to the intake conduits respectively between the Apump chambers and their intake valves, an intake valve in each by-pass conduit, and a pressure relief valve 'for controlling the pressure in the Working conduit. v 12. In a double-acting pump, a housing, a pisvton reciprocable therein and dividing` the same into two chambers forming alternately suction and compression chambers respectively, an intake conduit .for each chamber having an intake valve, a fluid feed for each conduit, an outlet conduit for each chamber having a delivery valve therein, a common discharge conduit having connection with both of said delivery valves and having two branch conduits, one being a working conduit and the other having by-pass conduits connected to the intake conduits respectively, and a pressure relief valve for controlling the pressure in the working coduit.

I3. In a double-acting pump, a housing, a piston reciprocable therein and dividing the same intotwo chambers forming alternately suction and compression chambers respectively, an intake conduit for each chamber having anintake valve, a Vfluid feed for each conduit, an outlet conduit for each chamber having a delivery valve therein, a common discharge conduit having conn Vnection with both of said delivery valves and having two branchfconduits, one being a working conduit and the other having by-pass conduits `connected to the intake conduits respectively, .a

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415265 *Feb 22, 1944Feb 4, 1947Malsbary Mfg CompanyPumping system
US2665698 *Feb 23, 1949Jan 12, 1954Robinson Leo CVenetian blind cleaning apparatus
US3597125 *Jul 1, 1969Aug 3, 1971Hypro IncLiquid injector assembly for piston pumps
US3791763 *Feb 22, 1972Feb 12, 1974Faldi GPump used in dredging systems operating with compressed air
US4673296 *Jul 18, 1985Jun 16, 1987Dymo Science Inc.Mixing pump for transport and effective mixing (homogenization) of two or more liquids (gases) with a constant, but adjustable, ratio of the liquids
US4700422 *Oct 2, 1985Oct 20, 1987Russell V LeeMultiple use drain cleaning apparatus
US4773113 *Oct 19, 1987Sep 27, 1988Russell V LeeMultiple use cleaning apparatus
US5894609 *Mar 5, 1997Apr 20, 1999Barnett; Ralph L.Safety system for multiple drain pools
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/136, 366/332, 134/94.1, 417/503
International ClassificationF04B13/00, B60S3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB60S3/044, F04B13/00
European ClassificationF04B13/00, B60S3/04C