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Publication numberUS2266369 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1941
Filing dateMay 25, 1939
Priority dateMay 25, 1939
Publication numberUS 2266369 A, US 2266369A, US-A-2266369, US2266369 A, US2266369A
InventorsKohn Jules J
Original AssigneeKohn Jules J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot correction
US 2266369 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 16; 1941. J. J. KOHN F001 CORRECTION Filed May 25, 1939 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS WITNESS Patented Dec. 16, 1941 242 3 3 7 G GHQ J- ;lfie Miami, Ea! Amiliee en ai 5; Seine/ N0: 215,710

My in e tion relates to the menuiae ure. o shoes. and. h s a ong i s obje ts and advantages the provision at impr ved last. e ign d to Pattern shoes novel moi. c rr ction p op-- erties.

Most al me hanical feet: roubles a s by mis ignm n i the.- he l he e- Aliemnent oi the forefoo is automaticall contro led by the ative pos tion oi the eel boner Proper tee action necessary to bring the 1 5. into p y to t end tha the lat er may he Pro erl exercised, I-nactiv leg muscles ecome weak and it naturally follows that the ,fo t also becomes. weak. Correct foot alignment and actienivr quires that. the great toe be brought. into. ac ion. Misa ignment off the root. either b alienation eversiom will pr vent the great tee from. tunenin r p r yor ect wei ht dist buti n throughout the footis determined by the relative: position of the heel l 1 e.v Proper alignmentof the foot structure may be had, through proper a i nment of the hee oney and conve t n footwear is sovdgsignedr as, to de eat. proper align.- ment of the, heel b ne.

Accordingly, an ob ec or my nvent on is, to provide a. last designed. ,for the menuiaetnre of. shoes contou d so as to enabl thes o ot to tune: tion pr per y iii-a di ion o e -r citing the mele aligned. foot. to, the end that the bon s ru tu e may be properly aligne wh eh in b ings the leg muscles intoplay. e shoe, constructed a c d n e w h m la tri d si ner; a t eirectively ali n the heel b n and 1.1 1 1 it in Desition, whi e the gene al sho et ue ure will e uch as to cradle the. foot. ior. bringing its. natural upp rtin elements intoipreper alignment to. the end th t the. ent re root may ha e "normal rune.- tion. 7

In he. accompanying thawi g;

Figu i an ins de .eleva Qnel View .Qf'e. i ht foot las in man e We my nvention;

Figure 215 a bottom plan view;

i u e .3 is arear elevational view;

Figure 41s a front elevational view with a part broken away for the sake of clearness;

Figure 5 is a cross sectional view of a shoe designed in accordance with my last structure, with the section taken transversely of the shoe in the plane of the ball of the foot;

Figure 6 is a transverse sectional view of the heel structure of the shoe; and

Figure 7 is a rear elevational view of a human heel bone.

In the embodiment selected to illustrate my invention, I make use of a last l0 wherein the wit he ast sh e.so1e truetnre?fl ,A di ional th ls ees Z l meuehent an area co resp nding to the reces H; as viewing i 'l' ie enedl area 3 ep re en y i t? the. flattened a ea 241 eelee met ie 21 ill the efo e be n e d sif waited a a anaerheath the ut r boll. area of he ten with Penis to ti t the. tenet 11. it ns de bell area t9 brine the natural n the bott m of the eat oe intoaetien i completin the .etep,

s n lu e the usl e m tai e seat 251! ut th seat s o. ded with a twir in l ed on. th inner sin e o the. eat 2h Aeeersh, the heel. s ruetureepzei' h hoe. will be chap aeteri ed by a d preesi n 3;; whieh QQREJtLL e e t ie theaB X .34 i the he ltene 39-. laelioee. built n. a cord nce. with eenren ienal' t e hee v s ruetare hat 4 Q makes no @QQQWQQQ? tion Whatever o t e. a

Tnusvwhenweigntis tranemr te tfthe iieel he of a foot wearing a conventional shoe, as

he: "the- "e which turn. :2 t the ie B ave alie iine, the bone structure of the foot, requires acc modation for the apex 34 of the heel bone i the latter may i wardly to secure 121 9 alig ment- Ihe de re sion. .33 o 6- menutes a seet er. th a ex s thatt ie heelhene 36 w llb p op rly alan ed i tru ali nment which t ite m t re uires that the h l. home b turned inwardl an the se t i ee iehe to restrain the heel bone from tilting in an outward direction.

In Fig. 1, I illustrate the instep and heel curvature and alignment of a conventional last in dotted lines 42. This portion of my last quarter is dropped beneath the conventional contour so as to permit the instep of the'foot to drop to accommodate inward tilting of the heel bone and turning of the foot inwardly and downwardly so as to bring the leg muscles into normal action. Fig. 2 illustrates the inside instep curvature of a. conventional last in dotted lines 44, while the full line illustration of my last has been somewhat straightened. Thus, the instep structure of a shoe in accordance with the last is widened to provide accommodation for the shift in the instep of the foot. The upper line 46 of the last has also been lowered with respect to the conventional line of the ordinary last, indicated in dotted lines 48. In viewing Fig. 4, the cone Q8 of the last tilts inwardly with respect to the Waist of a conventional last, the latter being indicated in dotted lines 50. Such realignment of the cone in the last provides a shoe wherein a straight line 52, see Fig. 2, extends between the first and second metatarsals, substantially parallels the latter and intersects the protrusion 28. With the line considered as a plane, Fig. 4 illustrates its position with respect to the cone 48" and the first and second metatarsals. 'In- Fig. 5, the shoe portion 52 is so fashioned by reason of the corresponding contour 54 of the last as to provide sufiicient room to permit the foot to roll over properly on its first metatarsal. Last I is also fashioned full at 56 to give the third toe room so that the foot can spread and each metatarsal head can carry its weight.

A shoe formed in accordance with my invention permits free and proper foot action. Thus, in walking, the weight is first transmitted to the heel and then moves along the outer side of the foot to the outer ball when it is then transferred to the inside ball or first metatarsal by reason of the resulting elevation in the sole structure. The lift or elevation also functions to place tension on ,the outside of the foot to aid in supporting the ankle bone and heel bone in proper relative positions. As the weight is transferred to the inside or inner ball of the foot, the depression in the heel structure of the shoe provides a seat for the heel of the foot and the heel structure has been dropped to provide a cradle for accommodating the foot as it straightens. Thus, my last provides a shoe characterized by a threepoint balance for the heel, the inner and outer balls of the foot. In this manner, the heel is held in its proper position and the rest of the foot properly aligns itself to the heel bone which is the controlling element or rudder for the entire foot. Maintaining the heel bone in proper aligninent maintains corresponding alignment of the knee bone and the leg bones as well as the pelvic joints.

While I have described certain embodiments ofmy invention in detail, it is, of course, understood that I do not desire to limit the scope thereof to the exact details set forth except in so far as those details may be defined in the appended claims.

, I claim? 1. A shoe last having a heel seat forming area provided with a protrusion intersected by the longitudinal'axis of the last to provide a depres- 'sion in the heel of a shoe formed on the last, said protrusion being located to form the depression'in the shoe in vertical alignment with the heel bone of the foot to which the shoe is fitted to rotate the heel bone in a. medial direction, said longitudinal axis substantially paralleling and being substantially located between the first and second metatarsals, said last having a cone located vertically above said longitudinal axis, and a shoe quarters forming portion centered vertically of said longitudinal axis.

2. A shoe last having a heel seat forming area provided with a protrusion intersected by the longitudinal axis of the last to provide a depression in the heel of a shoe formed on the last, said protrusion being located to form the depression in the shoe in vertical alignment with the heel bone of the foot to which the shoe is fitted torotate the heel bone in a medial direction, said longitudinal axis substantially paralleling and being substantially located between the firstand second metatarsals, said last having a cone located vertically above said longitudinal axis, a shoe quarters forming portion centered vertically of said longitudinal axis, and said last being provided with a latera1 ball forming area in the nature of a depression to provide an elevation in the corresponding sole structure of the shoe.

3. A shoe last having a heel seat forming area provided with a protrusion intersected by the longitudinal axis of the last to provide a depression in'the heel of a shoe formed on the last, said protrusion being located to form the depression in the shoe in vertical alignment with the heel bone of the foot to which the shoe is fitted to rotate the heel bone in a medial direction, said longitudinal axis substantially paralleling and being substantially located between the first and second metatarsals, said last having a cone located vertically above said longitudinal axis, a shoe quarters forming portion centered vertically of said longitudinal axis, and said last having a shank forming area widened throughout the instep contour thereof.

4. A shoe last having a heel seat forming area provided with a protrusion intersected by the longitudinal axis of the last to provide a depression in the heel of a shoe formed on the last, said protrusion being located to form the depression in the shoe in vertica1 alignment with the heel bone of the foot to which the shoe is fitted to rotate the heel bone in a medial direc tion, said longitudinal axis substantially parallelof the last and respect to conventional 1am JULES J.IKOHN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3104419 *Aug 24, 1962Sep 24, 1963Du PontSpinneret pack
US5595005 *Mar 21, 1994Jan 21, 1997James L. ThroneburgFootwear system
US5724753 *Oct 7, 1996Mar 10, 1998James L. ThroneburgFootwear system
US5881413 *Jun 28, 1996Mar 16, 1999James L. ThroneburgShoe last and method of constructing a shoe
US5909719 *Dec 3, 1997Jun 8, 1999James L. ThroneburgShoe last and method of constructing a shoe
US6785986 *Aug 1, 2000Sep 7, 2004C.D. Johgenengel Beheer BvShoe and sole fitted with torsion stiffener
US6880266Apr 9, 2003Apr 19, 2005Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Footwear sole
US6948262May 5, 2003Sep 27, 2005Kerrigan D CaseyCantilevered shoe construction
US7418790Sep 26, 2005Sep 2, 2008Kerrigan D CaseyCantilevered shoe construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/133.00R, 36/144, 36/172
International ClassificationA43D3/02, A43D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43D3/021
European ClassificationA43D3/02B