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Publication numberUS2266995 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1941
Filing dateJul 26, 1940
Priority dateJul 26, 1940
Publication numberUS 2266995 A, US 2266995A, US-A-2266995, US2266995 A, US2266995A
InventorsHenry Schultz Rudolph, James Siebert Adam
Original AssigneeSchultz Engineering Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic rewinding machine
US 2266995 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1941.- R. H. SCHULTZ ETAL j 2,256,995

AUTOMATIC REWINDING MACHINE I Filed July 26, 1940 s Sheet s-Sheet 1 Y INVENTORS I R0004 a Hervey, .Scma. 7':

By' WM 6756597 ATTQ XNEY.

.Dec. 23, 1941. R. H. SCHULTZ ETAL AUTOMATIC REWINDING MACHINE Filed July 26, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Ruoouw HENRY ScHuu-z BY 1404i JhMs's 57:55??- ATTORNE Dec. 23, 1941.

R. H. SCHULTZ ET AL AUTOMATIC REWINDINGMACHINE h 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed July 26, 1940 PUDOLPH E/vey SCI-{01.72 BY ALMZAMES 5 59 97 ATTQRNE'.

Dec. 23, 1941.

R. H. SCHULTZ ET AL AUTOMATIC REWINDING MACHINE Filed July 26, 1940 I Euoaapn HEN Y SCHULTZ By 404 s flees/2r I 1 URNEY.

Dec. 23, 1941. R. H. SCHULTZ ET AL AUTOMATIC REWINDING MACHINE Filed July 26, 1940 5 SheetsSheet 5 INVENTORS PUD LPH HENRY SCHULTZ BY A 0/1 AMES IE5 ATTORNE Patented Dec. 23, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC REWINDING MACHINE Rudolph Henry Schultz and Adam James Siebert,

Brooklyn, N. Y., assignors to Schultz Engineering Corporation, Brooklyn, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application July 26, 1940, Serial No. 347,648

13 Claims.

line of perforations as a line for rupture or separation of the individual 'rewound rolls from the web of the inillroll; to provide automatic means for tearing or pulling the paper apart on the desired tear lines or lines of perforations; to avoid tearing the paper on intermediate lines of perforations; to avoid use of cutters other than the means for producing the tear lines or lines of perforations; to automatically introduce a pulling or rupturing tension periodically upon the traveling web for tearing the same apart; to provide a machine which will perform the above functions;

to secure simplicity of construction and operation; and to obtain other advantages and results as may be brought out in the following description.

Drawings Referring to the accompanying drawings in which like numerals of reference indicate similar parts throughout the several views:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the portion of a rewinding machine embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a sectional view showing the perforating producing means in section;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the essential elements of the invention with certain parts omitted for the sake of clarity;

Figure 4 is a face view of the web passing over the rolls between which it is tensioned and caused to rupture;

Figure 5 is a diagrammatic perspective view showing the method of applying the rupturing tension;

Figure 6 is a sectional elevation similar to Figure l of the tensioning mechanism;

Figure 7 is a sectional view substantially on line l! of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a View similar to Figure 5 and showing a modified construction of the tensioning means;

Figure 9 is a sectional view of the rolls between which the web is tensioned and ruptured;

Figure 10 is a diagrammatic view of the functioning of the tensioning rolls;

Figure 11 is a face View of the tensioning rolls and associated means for applying the tension;

Figure 12 is a face view of the under tensioning roll; and l 1 Figure 13 is a longitudinal sectional'view in part of the tensioning rolls and associated parts in their position where tension is being applied to the web for rupturing the same.

Description In the specific embodiment of the invention illustrated in said drawings, it is emphasized that the general organization of an automatic rewinding machine is illustrated in the above mentioned patent and accordingly in the present disclosure it has been deemed unnecessary to enter into details of the mounting for the millroll or the transition of the'web onto thesuccessive cores held temporarily by the tube; or

. carrier reel. The same means as illustrated in said patent are intended to be used in the present machine. Inasmuch as the present invention is directed more particularly to the production of the tear line or line of perforations in the web and rupturing the web periodically on certain of those lines, the description and drawings are confined as far as possible just to theinvention, and for further understanding of the unwinding of the web and rewinding thereof, reference is to be had to the said prior patent. H

According to the present invention, and referring initially to the structure illustrated in Figures 1 to 7 inclusive, at this time, the reference numeral l5 designates the side standards or frames and the reference numeral I6 indicates the web unwinding from the millroll carried at the rear of the machine by suitable support permitting the web to unroll and be drawn upwardly past a tension or take-up roller I1 and then upwardly forward to an idler roller ill at the top of the machine all of which is in accordance with the prior art construction of the patent mentioned. Below said idler i8 is a large driven roller I9 upon which the said idler roller rests for obtaining gravitational pressure upon the web which passes three-quarters the way around'the said idlerroller and between the same and the larger under roller. The web also passes threequarters of the way around this said larger under roller l9 so as to be directed upwardly forward when leaving the same and there passes over an tance between the tear lines or lines of perforations theretofore applied to the web by means hereinafter described, and forpurposes to be explained. From the lower pair of rollers 22 and 23, the web is directed forwardly downward and is applied to a cardboard or other core 24. By mechanisms not here shown, but forming the subject matter of the said prior patent, the end of the web is applied to a core every timean end is made, said cores being carried on chucks 25 which have a planetary revolution for removing a complete roll of paper and presenting a new core to the web each time a new end of the web is made, as will be understoodvfrom inspection of the said prior patent.

As here shown, the large roller l9 about which the web has a three-quarter turn preferably constitutes a female tear line forming or perforating member. Rearwardly downward of this said roller I9 is an accompanying roller 26 which preferably has the same surface speed as said roller l9, and is here shown of substantially the same diameter. This last mentioned roller 28 constitutes the male member for the tear line forming or perforating unit. As here shown, a tear line forming blade 21 or perforator projects radially from the periphery of the said roller 26 and a corresponding recess or groove 28 is provided in the female roller l9, the recess or groove of the one roller being coordinated with the perforator or blade 21 of the other roller so as to register with each rotation of the rollers. It is preferable to provide a plurality of blades and recesses or grooves in the said rollers, the distance between successive blades representing the distances between lines of perforations formed in the web as the machine operates. As clearly shown in Figure 2, a chordal hole may be drilled in the roller 26 perpendicular to and intersecting the blade, the lower end of the hole being a smaller diameter and threaded so as to receive a screw 29 therein for retaining the blade in its socket.

It will now be understood that the machine is particularly adapted to rerolling of web material upon cores for such uses as paper towels, toilet paper and the like.

The blades 21 and cooperating recesses 28 do 'not entirely sever the web at any time, but are that in one way or another weakens the'c'ontinuity of the paper by mere scoring, perforating, partially severing andthe like. The specific illustration of the drawings is intended to show a blade with a toothed edge and which will thus make a line or series of perforations across the web with each functioning of the blade. By maintaining substantially the same surface speed of the male and female tear line or perforation producing rollers l9 and 26 as well as the same surface speed of advancing rollers'20 and 2|, no undue tension is placed upon the web after the tear line has been formed in the passage of the web from one pair of rollers tothe other. Furthermore, while any individual rerolled product is being rolled on the core, the second pair of rollers 22, 23 also have the same surface speed as the advancing rollers. However, when it is desired to rupture the paper forming the web to complete the one product or rewound roll and produce a fresh end to start winding a new product or rewound roll on the next core, it is then intended to increase momentarily the surface speed of the second pair of rollers 22 and 23 and apply a rupturing tension upon the portion of the web between that pair of rollers and the preceding pair of feed rollers. This tension will suffice to rupture the web at a tear line or line of perforations at that moment situated somewhere between the two pairs of rollers. Since, as stated above, the distance between the pairs of rollers is substantially the distance between successive tear lines of the web, there must necessarily be a tear or line of perforations in the web situated between pairs of rollers at the time the said tension is applied.

The means for producing the tension for rupturing the web as above explained, is important subject matter of the present, invention. The specific means for accomplishing the purpose shown in Figs. 1 to 7 inclusive, will now be described.

At the middle of the machine is a stud 30 on which is mounted worm gear 3| in mesh with a worm 32 on a vertically disposed shaft 33 shown carried in a bearing 34. Above the bearing is a mitre gear 35 in mesh with another mitre gear 36 fast upon the main drive shaft 31 parallel to said stud and supported by said frames l5. This main drive shaft is suitably power driven and rotates continuously. Fast upon this main drive shaft between the frames is carried a roller 20. A spur gear 38 likewise is shown on this same shaft 31 at the end of roller 20 away from the mitre gear. This spur gear is in mesh with a cooperating spur gear 39 upon the shaft 40 on which the other feed roller 2| is mounted. Said spur gear 39 and feed roller 2| are both fast with respect to the shaft 40. Tear line forming or perforating rollers l9 and 26 respectively are mounted upon shafts 4| and 42, the former of which also carries a larger spur gear 43 in mesh with a small spur gear 44 on the drive shaft 31. Another large spur gear 45 is on the shaft 4| of the tear line forming or perforating roller IE) to cooperate with a similar gear on shaft 42 of male tear line forming or perforating roller for obtaining positive drive and coordination of those rollers simultaneously. Shaft 40 of the upper feed roller 2| has a further gear 41 thereon for driving a train of gearing to the winding mechanism, and for a more detailed understanding of the same reference may be had to the said prior patent.

It'should be noted in Figure 2, that rubber inserts or pinch bars 26a in the male perforating cylinder next the blade pinch and hold the web taut against female perforating cylinder so that the perforating blade can pierce the paper or web, as the web, especially in case of toweling which is crimped or creped, will stretch and if the web is not taut will not permit a blade to enter freely, due to the crepe stretching and thereby making a poor perforation; therefore we pinch a small portion of the web between rubber, as illustrated, and hold it taut while perforating.

The lowerpair of tension applying rollers 22, 23 are interconnected with constantly meshing gears 48, 49. Roller 22- may be conveniently carried in adjustable eccentric bearings for permitting an adjustment of pressure of the rollers 22, 23, towards each other, to secure pinch between the rollers and similar purposes. One of these gears, and here shown as gear 49,'is driven from constantly rotating shaft 49 of the upper pair of feed rollers through a train of gearing including a differential next to be described.

At the near side of the machine as viewed in Figures 1, 3 and 6, said shaft 40 has a driving gear 50 secured thereon which is in mesh with a large idler mounted on an upper supporting stud 52 by which said idler is situated at a distance from and parallel to the frame. Said idler is in turn in mesh with an outer end portion of an extra wide gear 53 rotatable upon another fixed supporting stud 54 projecting from the frame parallel to and below the said upper stud 52. The extra width of said gear 53 extends inwardly toward the-frame, and next to and inward of said wide gear and also rotatable upon stud 54, is a ratchet wheel 55, next inwardly on the stud and rotatable with respect thereto is another gear 56 which is also preferably a wide gear of substantially the same width as wide gear 53 and both said wide gears being of the same pitch diameter. Next inward of the said stud 54 and between the last mentioned wide gear and the frame is mounted a lever arm 51 which is free to oscillate upon stud 54. This lever is shown extending upwardly and has a movable stud 58 projecting laterally therefrom for supporting a pawl 59 above ratchet wheel 55. This pawl, by gravity or otherwise, will have a feeding contact with the ratchet Wheel as the arm is swung forwardly and will ride over the teeth of the ratchet wheel as the arm is swung rearwardly. Rotation of the ratchet wheel is periodically obtained by means to be described hereinafter at definite intervals when desired to rupture the web on a tear line. Backward rotation of the ratchet is prevented by a suitable detaining pawl 59a.

Before proceeding further, it is to be noted gear drive to the first mentioned wide gear 53.

by interposing large idler gear 5| between the same and driving gear 50 on the driven shaft 46 of the upper pair of rollers gives a constant driving rotation to the first mentioned wide gear 53. The several gears are arranged to give the same surface speed to the lower rollers 22, 23, as being given to the upper pair of rollers 20, 2|, during the normal rewinding period of desired length of web. However, wide gear 53 and wide gear 56 are parts of a differential drive. As clearly shown in Figure 7, wide gear 53 is in mesh with a planetary gear 69 which extends inwardly into an opening in the ratchet wheel and is in turn there in mesh with a similar planetary gear 6| which projects from the opening at the other side of the ratchet wheel and is in mesh with the second wide gear 56. The planetary gears 60 and 6| rotate within the opening in the ratchet wheel and are supported with respect to the ratchet wheel by suitable brackets 62 on opposite sides of and secured to said ratchet wheel. According to this showing, therefore, idler wheel 5| is driving the first wide gear 53 which in turn drives the first planetary gear 69 which in turn drives the second planetary gear 6| which in turn drives the second wide gear 56, and under these conditions both wide gears 53 and 56 are rotating at the same speed. At the moment it is desired to rupture the web, arm 51 is rocked to advance the ratchet wheel a notch or so, and since planetary gears 60 and GI are mounted on the ratchet wheel, the inner wide differential gear 56 is thereby rotated an additional amount over rotation of the other wide difierential gear 53 corresponding to the amount of rotation of the ratchet wheel. Inner differential gear 56 is in mesh with gear 49 secured on shaft 63 onwhich tension roller 23 is secured. Said gear 49 is also in mesh with gear 48 secured on shaft 64 to which the "cooperating tension roller 22 is secured. Consequently the lower pair of tension rollers 22, 23 have been given a momentary greater surface speed than the upper pair of rollers 20, 2| thereby tensioning and rupturing the web.

' In order to obtain the periodic swinging of arm 51, suitable mechanism for the purpose is incorporated. As here shown, and suitably connected to and rotatable with worm gear 31, is a small gear 65 situated on the stud 30, said small gear 65 being in mesh with a larger gear 66 on a stud 61 so as to drive said large gear 66 slowly. Connected to this large gear on the same axis therewith is another small gear 68 in mesh with another large gear 69 on a cam shaft 19. This relationship of large and small gears obtains a very considerable speed reduction and the final large gear 69 is moving comparatively slowly. Connected with this last larg'e'gear 69 is an arm or toe H, the outer end of which provides a contact surface for engagement with a suitable contact element or toe 12, carried by a horizontally disposed arm 13 shown pivoted to the frame at M. The outer end of this arm connects by link E5 to a laterally projecting arm 16 which is preferably integral with aforementioned arm 5'! and forming therewith a bell crank lever. Every time large gear 69 makes a complete revolution the contact elements ll and'lZ engage and arm 13 is lifted, transmitting the motion to the bell crank lever and creating the tension in the web as above described. The length of web rerolled on any single core is therefore governed by the timing of the rotation of contact arm ll. The several gears constituting the reduction gearing are preferably replaceable in other proportions, and for that purpose the stud 61 mounting gears 66 and 68 is preferably c'arriedby a movable support 11 trunnioned on stud 30 and secured in adjusted position by a suitable bolt 18 passing through an arcuate slot 19. By substituting a different size gear 69 the length of web between ruptures may thus be varied.

It may be emphasized at this time that the web I6 is given a plurality of successive tear lines or lines of perforations entirely across the web and at the desired intervals determined by the spacing of blades 2'! heretofore described, said lines of perforations extending entirely across the web for enabling the ultimate user to tear off a short length or sheet of the web as desired. The machine of the present invention utilizes one of those tear lines for severing the web so as to make successive rolls of the length torn off. Such a severing or rupturing of the web is shown as having been made in Figures 4 and 5 at the tear line 80A. This periodic rupturing of the web accordingly produces a forwardly advancing front edge to the new length of web, and this front edge is properly guided after the rupture has been effected. A plurality of parallel slats or guides 8| are shown in Figures 4 and 6 more particularly situated beneath the Web longitudinally thereof between the periphery of feed roller 20 and tensioning roller 22, these several guides constituting a fixed way guiding the forward free edge of the web toward the tensioning rollers. Above theweb, and parallel to the guides 8| of the said way are forwardly traveling reaches of belts 82 which both confine the free edge to follow the straight path to the tensioning rollers and introduce an impelling force to the free edge by adequate frictional contact therewith. These belts are shown as situated in appropriate grooves in and extending around the upper feeding roller 2| and tensioning roller 23. As shown more particularly by the diagonal cross-lining on belts 82 in Figures 6, 8 and 9, said belts are preferably coil springs, thereby having resiliency or stretch available at the intervals of differential rate of surface travel of the said feeding and tensioning rollers about which said belts are belted. It is also pointed out that the grooves provided for the belts 82 in the rollers are concave, as distinguished from V-grooves, and accordingly accommodate slippage.

The drawings have not been complicated by showing of the guiding and delivery means from the tensioning rollers to the core, since the same is not per se a part of the present invention as it is prior art construction clearly shown in the said patent. Suffice it to say that the new forward edge of the ruptured web is each time fed to a new core and the length of web to the next rupture is wound upon the said core for constituting the rewound roll or new product and as soon as another rupture is made, that product moves out of the way and the new forward edge of the web is applied to a fresh core, and so on for the continued operation of the machine. It is to be understood that the web is constantly traveling at high speed at all times while the various operations are performed.

In the foregoing description, it will be observed that the tensioning rollers are always in contact with the web but that the tensioning is injected by a differential increase of surface speed of the tensioning rollers momentarily at intervals after the desired length of web has been rerolled upon a core. Other means for injecting the momentary tension upon the web may, however, be employed. As an illustration thereof reference may be had to Figures 8 to 13 inclusive. In 7 said figures, the feeding and scoring of the web is accomplished to feed rollers 20 and 2| as heretofore described. In this instance, however, tension or pinch rollers 22 and 23 are provided which are normally out of contact so that the web will pass between the same substantially for the length between ruptures without being frictionally engaged or actuated by the said tensioning rollers. The spacing of the tensioning rollers in advance of the feed rollers in this instance is, as desired, substantially an amount equal to the distance between successive scoring or tear lines on the web. As before, also, a fixed way such as guides 8| is provided beneath the web from feed roller 29 to tensioning roller 22 and the web is guided between this way and an adjacent reach of belts 82 passing around feed roller 2| and tensioning roller 23.

Tensioning roller 23' is carried upon and driven by an axle or shaft 83 which can be oscillated when desired toward the other tensioning roller 22 and obtain momentary contact for applying rupturing tension upon the web. It is accordingly desirable to have a greater surface speed present in the tensioning rollers than exists with the feeding rollers. Thus, with the tension ing rollers pinching the web, the greater surface speed of the tensioning or pinch rollers 22,

.23, will apply the desired tension upon the web for rupturing the Web on a tear line then present between the tensioning rollers and the feed rollers. Such an eventuality has been illustrated as having just occurred in Figure 9, thereby producing the rupture A in the web I9.

It is preferable to limit the time of contact of the tensioning rollers with the web, and as here shown, the under tensioning or pinch roller 22' is shown as having a longitudinal cleat or pinch bar 84 of rubber or other suitable material projecting from its surface and the upper tensioning or pinch roller 23 is provided with a corresponding sectional cleator pinch bar interrupted in its length by gap-s for admitting belts 82 to pass between the interrupted sections of the said cleat.

Inasmuch as belt 82 will have the same surface speed as the feed roller 2|, and inasmuch as it is desired to have a greater surface speed for tensioning or pinch roller 23', we preferably interpose pulleys '86 in the tensioning roller 23 mounted on suitable bearings for enabling the pulleys to have a different rate of rotation than the said roller. Accordingly, the tensioning of the web will be obtained by the contact of frictional cleats or pinch bars 84 and 85 off opposite sides of the web and by the said pinch bars having a greater surface speed than the web emanating from between feed rollers 20 and 2|.

Tensioning or pinch roller 23 as previously stated is carried upon and driven by an axle or shaft 83 which can be oscillated when desired toward the other tensioning roller 22 by means of oscillating levers 81 that are mounted on shaft 88. Fastened to one end of shaft 88 is lever 92 that is operated by means of link 15 to oscillate this shaft 88, and the levers 87 for moving roller 23' either toward or away from roller 22. Link Hi at its lower end is fastened to a lever or arm 73 by means of pivot 96. Toe 12 fastened to lever 73 contacts the toe and arm mounted with change gear on cam shaft similar to the operating of the differential arrangement described previously. When toe engages toe '|2 shaft 88 is oscillated bringing roller 23' in contact with roller 22. After these two toes have passed each other, roller 23' and oscillating arms 81 in which this roller is mounted move away from roller 22' by means of the action of spring rod 94 which is fastened to stud 96 that also holds link 15 to arm 13. This spring rod is slidably mounted at its other end in a swivel stud or poppet 95, spring rod 94 sliding in swivel poppet 95. Spring rod 94 has mounted on it a compression spring, one end of this compression spring being yieldably held against swivel poppet 95. The other end of compression spring 93 can be adjusted to secure more or less compression for holding pinch roller 23 out of contact from roller 22 by means of collar 91 which bears against the other end of compression spring 93. Collar 97 is setscrewed or clamped to spring rod 94.

Pinch roller 23' is driven by means of large gear 89. Said large gear 89 meshing with intermediate gear 99 mounted in a stud in one of the oscillating arms 81, intermediate gear in turn meshing with gear 9|, which is securely fastened to shaft 83 and drives this shaft and roller 23'. Gear 89 is fastened to gear 39 also carried on oscillating shaft 88. Gear 39 in turn is securely mounted on the end of roller 2|. Roller 2| in this instance however, is rotatably mounted on oscillating shaft 88, roller 2| being driven by gear 39, as stated above. Gear 39 in turn is driven from the main feed rollerzll by means of gear 38 which meshes therewith. Lower pinch roller 22 is also driven from the shaft on which main feed roller 20 is securely fastened by means of a gear 20A carried on this feed roller shaft meshing with an intermediate gear 22b which in turn meshes with gear 22a. carried on the shaft on which roller 22' is mounted.

It will be seen from the above description that rollers 2!, 22' and 23' are driven from the shaft on which roller 20 is mounted. Roller 2! is rotatably mounted on shaft 88, suitable bearings being provided at each end of this roller. Fastened to one end of this roller 2| is a gear 39, this gear being driven by means of gear 38 on the shaft on which roller 20 is mounted. Alongside and fastened to gear 39 is large gear 89. This large gear in turn drives an intermediate gear 90 mounted on a stud in one of the Oscillating levers or brackets 81. This gear 99 in turn meshing with, and. driving gear 9| mounted on shaft 83 thereby driving roller 23 fastened to this shaft. In addition, th shaft on which roller 28 is mounted a gear 20A through an intermediate gear 223 meshing with gear 22A fastened to shaft on which roller 22' is mounted drives this roller. Roller 23' is moved toward and away from roller 22' by means of the oscillating levers 8'! securely fastened to oscillating shaft 88. Shaft 88 in turn is oscillated and operated by lever 92 through link I which fastens to lever 13 which is pivotally mounted on stud 14 carried in the frame by means of the toe l2 fastened in pivotally mounted lever 13 engaging with toe H. When toe H engages toe 12, oscillating levers carrying roller 23' move this roller 23 so that the roller moves inwardly toward 22' to such a point where bearers 98 on roller 22' contact and engage bearers 99 on roller 23'. These bearers 98 and 99 are of such size, that they allow for a certain amount of space between rollers 22 and 23 for web [6 to freely move between them.

Attention is now called to change gear 69; mounted on cam shaft 10. Each tooth in this change gear represents either one or two revolutions of perforating cylinders l9 and 26. When change gear 69 meshes with small intermediate gear 68, perforating cylinders l9 and 28 make two revolutions for each tooth contained in the change gear. When change gear 69 meshes with large intermediate gear 66 carried on swinging plate, each tooth of the change gear represents one revolution of perforating cylinders I9 and 26. It will be noted that each revolution of the perforating cylinders l9 and 26 produces five perforated sheets. Therefore each tooth in the change gear represents either five sheets or ten sheets depending with which intermediate change gear 69 is meshed. Change gear 69 can b meshed with either small intermediate gear 68 or large intermediate gear 59 by simply reversing this change gear. In the event a. change gear containing one hundred teeth is employed, with this change gear meshing with large intermediate gear 65 it will be noted that this change gear 69 and the camshaft 'Hl will make one revolution in which space of time perforating cylinders I9 and 26 will have fed and perforated five hundred sheets. If however, one hundred tooth change gear 69 is meshed with small intermediate gear 58 when change gear 69 and cam shaft 18 make one complete revolution, perforating cylinders 19 and 25 will have fed and perforated one thousand sheets of material. It will be seen from the above description that depend? ing on the numberof teeth employed in the change gear 69 varying amounts of material will be fed and perforated by perforating cylinders on one revolution of this change gear and the cam shaft 10. representing either five or ten sheets of material perforated and fed from the above perforating cylinders l9 and 26. However, cam shaft 10 through arm II is employed as a timing element for operating the oscillating levers 81 and their subtended pinch roller 23'. Each time operating lever H makes one revolution engaging toe 12, the rupturing of the high speed feeding web will be obtained. It will be noted from the above description that the cam shaft HI only makes one revolution for either five hundred or one thousand sheets of fed web produced by the perforating cylinders l9 and 26. Each revolution of the perforating cylinders produces either five or ten perforated sheets. It will therefore be seen that the perforating cylinders l9 and 26 make either one hundred or two hundred revolutions for each revolution of the change gear 69 and cam shaft 10.

Toe H, due to cam shaft 10 rotating very slowly, remains engaged with toe 12 for a slight space of time. This space of time however, is of a suinciently long interval to allow a considerable amount of material to be perforated and fed before it again disengages. It will therefore be seen that if cleats were not employed in rollers 22' and 23', these rollers due to rotating at a speed in excess of the paper speed, would stay in contact for a period of time that would be too long, with the result that the web instead of being pulled apart at only one particular perforation, these rollers 22" and 23' would remain contacting each other for such an extended period of time before toe ll would leave toe 12 that instead of just the one perforation being pulled apart quite a few sheets would :be pulled apart. We therefore employ as stated above, the cleats in these rollers 22' and 23'. In addition to the cleats, the rollers are both of a. different diameter although both having the same surface speed. This surface speed as stated above through suitable gearing being in excess of the paper or web speed.

As illustrated in Figure 10, as the arms 81. bring roller 23 toward roller 22, to such a point where bearers 98 and 99 contact each other, the cleats B4 and in the respective rollers however do not contact each other until these rollers have made several revolutions, roller 22 making five revolutions and roller 23 making four revolutions befcrethe cleats 84 and 85 contact each other. It will therefore be seen that through the correct setting of the several parts as lever 91 brings roller 23 to contact roller 22', the cleats 84 and 85 will not contact each other until roller 22' has made five revolutions and roller 23' four revolutions. At this point the web is pulled apart at a perforation. The rollersthen rotate four and five revolutions respectively before the cleats will again contact each other. However, before this occurs arm 81 moves pinch roller 23 away from pinch roller 22' due to toe ll passing toe l2.

Inasmuch as these general inventive features of high speed constantly moving web with measuring mean-s, timing control for rupturing and utilization of slow motion timing control for the rupturing motion in combination withmome'n Each tooth in the change gear tary application of. rupturing tension on the web would be an inventive concept broader than the specific showings of other construction, and make it clearly apparent that the invention is susceptible to variou modifications and changes, It is accordingly to be understood that the invention is not restricted to the particular showings made in the drawings nor to the particular description thereof except as particularly pointed out in the following claims and construed in the light of the prior art.

We claim:

- l. In a rewinding machine of the character described for mill rolls having a web, high speed means rewinding successive portions of the mill roll in convolutions as rewound rolls with the web continuously progressing at high speed, means contacting the web at web speed between the mill roll and rewind roll, and means operating at greater speed than the high speed of the web, thereby tending to pull the web apart at the completion of rewinding the web of each rewound roll without interrupting high speed progression of the web.

2. In a rewinding machine of the character described for mill rolls having a web feeding at substantially constant speed, meansfor rewinding successive portions of the mill roll in convolutions as rewound rolls with the web leaving the mill roll at substantially constant speed, means contacting the constantly feeding web between the mill roll and rewind roll, and means operating at greater than said constant web speed tending to pull the web apart at the completion of rewinding the web of each rewound roll ,without interrupting the substantially constant progression of the web from the mill roll.

3. In a rewinding machine of the character described for millrolls having a constantly feeding web, means for rewinding a portion of the mill roll web in convolutions as a rewound roll, means for perforating the 'web during the continued substantially constant feeding thereat, means between the perforating means and rewound roll contacting the web as said web continues at sub stantially constant speed, and other means operating at greater than said substantially constant web speed tending to pull the said web apart at a predetermined perforation at the completion of rewinding the web of each rewound roll.

4. In a rewinding machine of the character described for mill rolls having a web feeding at substantially constant high speed constantly feeding web, means for rewinding a portion of the mill roll, means for perforating the constantly feeding web, means between the perforating means and rewound roll contacting the web at the substantially constant web speed, measuring means operating other means as said web continues to feed at high speed to contact the web at greater than web speed tending to pull the said web apart at a predetermined perforation at the completion of the rewinding the web of each rewound roll.

5. In a rewinding machine of the character described for mill rolls having a web feeding constantly at high speed, means for rewinding portions of the mill roll web in convolutions as rewound rolls with feeding of the web continuing constantly at high speed, means for perforating the constantly feeding web, means between the perforating means and rewound roll contacting the web at web speed, measuring means operating other means as said web continues to feed at high speed contacting the web at greater than web speed tending to pull the said web apart at a predetermined perforation at the completion of rewinding the web of each rewound roll.

6. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers maintained at substantially constant speed and in constant engagement with a web to be rewound, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers, and differential means for periodically and momentarily applying advancing tension on the web by the tensioning rollers to actuate the web where engaged by the tensioning rollers at a greater speed than travel of the web between feeding rollers thereby rupturing the web in its travel from one pair of rollers to the other during continued substantially constant feeding of the web.

7. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers maintained at substantially constant speed and in constant engagement with a web to be rewound, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers, a differential means for periodically and momentarily applying advancing ten:

sion on the web by the tensioning rollers to actuate the Web where engaged by the tensioning rollers at a greater speed than travel of the web between feeding rollers thereby rupturing the web in its travel from one pair of rollers to the feeding of the web, and slow-motion timing mechanism for periodically actuating said differential means.

8. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers maintained at substantially constant speed and in constant engagement with a web to be rewound, and tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers, said tensioning rollers having moments of simultaneous engagement with and greater speed than the said substantially constant speed of the web as fed from the feeding rollers.

9. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers maintained at substantially constant speed and in constant engagement with a web to be rewound, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers and also having constant engagement with the web, and differential means for periodically and momentarily applying advancing tension on the web by the tensioning rollers to actuate the web where engaged by the tensioning rollers at a greater speed than the substantially constant travel of the web between the feeding rollers thereby rupturing the web in its travel from one pair of rollers to the other during continued substantially constant feeding of the web. 10. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers in constant engagement with a web to be rewound, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers and also having constant engagement with the web, and differential means comprising a pawl and ratchet wheel drive, said ratchet wheel having planetary gears thereon, and differential gears in mesh with planetary gears and driving the tensioning rollers normally at the same surface speed as the feeding rollers, means to cause a forward movement of the ratchet wheel increasing the'surface speed of the tensioning rollers over the surface speed of the feeding rollers for rupturing the web.

11. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers in constant engagement with a web to be rewound and constantly advancing said web at high speed, means in advance of the feeding rollers for establishing transverse tear-lines in the web at frequent intervals, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers, and differential means for periodically and momentarily applying advancing tension on the web by the tensioning rollers to actuate the web where engaged by the tensioning rollers at a greater speed than said high speed of travel of the web between the feeding rollers while the web continues to feed at high speed to the tensioning rollers thereby rupturing the Web on one of said tear-lines in its travel from one pair of rollers to the other.

12. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers in constant engagement with a Web to be rewound and constantly advancing said web at high speed, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers, differential means for periodically and momentarily applying advancing tension on the web by the tensioning rollers to actuate the web Where engaged by the tensioning rollers at a greater speed than travel of the web between the feeding rollers while the web continues to feed at high speed to the tensioning rollers thereby rupturing the web in its travel from one pair of rollers to the other, and slow-motion timing mechanism for periodically actuating said differential means and effecting rupture on one tear line distantly spaced from a previous rupture without applying rupturing tension on intervening tear-lines.

13. A rewinding machine comprising feeding rollers in constant engagement with a Web to be rewound and continuously feeding said Web forward at substantially constant speed, tensioning rollers spaced from the feeding rollers and spaced from each other during normal feeding of desired length of web, and means for engaging surface portions on said tensioning rollers simultaneously into feeding engagement with the, web with said surface portions having a surface speed greater than the surface speed of the feed rollers while said feed rollers continue feeding at said constant speed, said tensioning rollers thereby applying a rupturing tension periodically to said web.

RUDOLPH HENRY SCHULTZ. ADAM JAMES SIEBERT.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/521, 242/523, 242/533.4, 242/526.1, 225/96
International ClassificationB65H35/10, B65H35/00, B41L1/12, B41L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H35/10, B41L1/12
European ClassificationB65H35/10, B41L1/12