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Publication numberUS2267706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1941
Filing dateOct 18, 1939
Priority dateOct 18, 1939
Publication numberUS 2267706 A, US 2267706A, US-A-2267706, US2267706 A, US2267706A
InventorsRoland P Baile, Carey W Hord
Original AssigneeStandard Supercharger Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined supercharger and air cleaner
US 2267706 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 30, 1941.

R. P. BAILE ETAL www Patented Dec. 30, 1941 COMBINED SUP lIJtCHARGrER AND AIR CL ANER i Roland P. Baile, Medford, Md., and Carey W. Hord, New York, N. Y., assignors to Standard Supercharger Corporation, New York, N. Y., a

corporation of New York Application 'october 1s, 1939, serial No. 300,052

5 Claims. (Cl. 183-21) This invention relates to improvements in a combined supercharger and air cleaner for automotive engines.

In United States Patent No. 2,196,332, granted April 9, 1940, on copending application Serial No. 189,692, filed February 9, 1938, there is disclosed and claimed a combined supercharging and air cleaning device for mounting on the carburetor of an automotive engine and adapted for positioning in a moving air stream as, for example, that induced by the fan of the water cooling system of an automotive engine, or to be otherwise located where it can receive air at the underhood air pressure that is built up by the forward motion of the automobile itself, the device collecting the moving or pressure air and delivering it to the carburetor. The 'collected air is caused to move in a path such that its pressure and velocity are increased while at the same time the air stream is given a pronounced centrifugal motion whereby dirt and dust particles areseparated from the air' under the influence of centrifugal` design. Thus in a device built in accordance with the present invention a minimum amount of mounting space is required, this being important from the standpoint of mounting the device in the *restricted space available to it according to automobile engine and hood construction of current design. The present invention further con-i templates a combined supercharging and air cleaning device as aforesaid which may be cast, pressed or otherwise fashioned in sub-assembly sections capable 'of ready assembly. The improved design further incorporates simplified and highly'efllcient means of securing the assembled device to the engine carburetor whereby a substantially fast connection is assured Without rattling and vibration noises. Another important feature of the improved device resides in the means herein employed to prevent reentrainment of the separated dirt particles in the. moving air stream, even under conditions of high engine speed and consequent high air velocity.

Other objects will be in part obvious and in part hereinafter pointed out in connection with the following analysis of this invention wherein is illustrated an embodiment of the invention.

In the drawing- Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a combined supercharger and air cleaner in accordance with the present invention mounted on a typical automobile engine;

Fig. 2 is a perspective of the device shown in Fig. 1, with one side removed whereby the interior arrangement may be viewed;

Fig. 3 is a vertical longitudinal section taken through the device illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

Referring now to the drawing wherein like reference characters designate like parts throughout the several views, the combined supercharger and air cleaner of the present invention is shown to be constituted by an upper section I0 and a lower section Il, the sections being secured along the meeting line I2 by means to be described. The present invention ycontemplates that each of the sections I0 and Il shall be formed integral, with the constituent curved walls of each section being of curvature or having radii such as to permit removal of the forming parts or dies employed in the fashioning of the sections. The sections ID, H are each provided with spaced side walls, of which the related side walls Illa, Haare designated, the lower edge ofthe side walls Illa of the upper section engaging against the upper edge of the side Walls of the lower section. The upper section I0 has a top wall, the relatively forward portion of which flares upwardly as at Illb, and the relatively rear portion cf which extends downwardly along an arc of relatively fixed radius, thus to form the rear wall Ilic of the device.

Intermediate the forward and rear ends of the device and bridging the side walls Illa of the upper section is an upwardly convex bridge piece Ind having a forwardly extending portion Ille .which is shown to extend straightway and is inclined about 30 to the horizontal. The portion Ille terminates on a line in the plane of the meeting line I2 of the sections. The relatively rearward portion of the bridge is arched to extend along an arc of substantially constant radius and terminates in a horizontal rear edge which also corresponds to the meeting line I2. here understood that the arcs of constant-radii along which extend the rear portion I0c and-the bridge piece Ind are struck from different centers which areso related that the cross-sectional area of the passue formed between the side walls Illa,

the top and rear wall I b, IIlc and the upper surface of the bridging member Illd is gradually reduced from front to rear of the passage.

Also extending between the side wallsIUa of the upper section is a generally vertical web or partition'lllf whose lower edge corresponds to the meeting line J2 of the sections and whose upper edge is spaced from the under surface of the bridge piece I 0d to provide an opening IUg. As Awill be apparent from Fig.v 3, the partition curves somewhat rearwardly along a line which, if continued, would merge into the downwardly curved forward portion of .the bridge piece I 0d.

Considering now the construction of the bottom section I I, this is fashioned to provide a generally horizontal bottom wall IIb which may flare downwardly adjacent its forward portion, its rear portion extending upwardly as at IIc along a c'urve of substantially constant radius, and terminating in an upper edge which' engages against the lower edge of the rear wall Illc of the upper section IIJ and along the meeting line l2.

Extending between the side walls I la of the lower section and substantially above the level of the bottom wall Ilb'is an upwardly concaved bridge piece 'IId which extends along an arc of relatively great radius, and terminates in a rear edge which meets the lowerrear edge of the upper bridge piece IIJd at the section meeting line I2. The bridge Ild at its forward edge terminates substantially in the plane of the meeting line I2 and substantially rearwardly of the partition Illf of the upper section. By reference to Fig. 2 particularly, it will be seen that the lower bridge piece forms with the bottom wall IIb a passage in continuation of the passage oi the upper section.

The lower bridge piece IId has an opening IIe therein, such constituting the inlet to ayetically arranged outlet tube IIf which is preferably integral with the `lower section to extend through the air passage therein and which opens through the lower wall I Ib. Tube I If is provided adjacent its forward portion with a streamlining nose or extension IIg, such serving to minimize'eddyingl of the air as it sweeps past the sides and tively forward portion of the tube.

The lower section II is provided with a transrelasverse lip or dam IIh which extends between the side walls II a and upwardly from the bottom wall IIb, being sloped or curved along an arc such as to direct the air flow in upward direction. The portion IIh terminates well .below the upper edge of`the side wall .IIa as will be clearly seen in Fig-3.A

From the forward edge of the bottom wall IIb there extends an inclined wall IIy' having an inclination corresponding to that of the portion I De of the bridge piece IIId, its upper edge meet` ing the lower forward edge of the portion I0e :along the meeting line I2.v The inclined walls Ille and IIy' cooperate with thetop wall ofthe upper section and the side walls of the sections 'to provide a funnel-shaped air scoop through which air enters the device.

By reference particularly to Fig. 3, it will be seen that upon assembly of the sections, a chamber 3|! is provided in advance of the lip or darn.

IIh, such chamber being closedfrom the top and front by the inclined wall portions I'0e and lli,

on its sides by the side walls I Ia and on its bottom by the bottom wall I Ib of the lower section. Within-'such space a quantity ofA oil may be maintained, the depth of which is determined by the height of the dam IIh;

with vertically aligned bosses which are suitably drilled as indicated, to receive the upper portion of the bolt I3. A wing nut I8 threaded on to the upper threaded end of the bolt I3 and bearing on the upper boss may thereupon be utilized to secure the upper section to the lower section in detachable manner.

In order to locate properly the sections with reference to each other, one of the. sections, such as the upper section, may be provided along its lo'wer edge with downwardly extending tongues wh and Illy' which engage in suitable notches in the wall parts IIc and lli of the lower section.

Ths tongue and notch arrangement insures that the parts are properly aligned prior to securing the sections fast to each other and maintains proper alignment thereafter. i

As will be apparent from Fig. 2, the sectional structure as described above, when assembled, provides an air passage having a large area inlet portion, as defined by the sidewalls Ida, ila, the flared top wall Illb, and the inclined bottom wall portions Ie, lli, through which air may enter in a generally horizontal path. As the passage progresses from its substantially horizontally disposed inlet portion, the cross-sectional area thereof is gradually reduced, the lpassage terminating in the vertical outlet tube lif through which air entering the enlarged area inther, due to the spiral path of travel, the air Preferably, the plate IIp is arranged at a level.

is given a pronounced `centrifugal motion, with the result that dirt particles separate from the air stream and tend .to collect in the lower portion of the passage under the influence of gravity.

This tendency of the dirt particles, followingv their separation, to collect in the low level portion or region of the air passage, while pronounced at low engine speeds, may be overcome' by the air moving at high velocity at the high engine speeds and, unless means are provided to prevent their reentrainment, the separated dirt particles would be picked -up by the air stream and blown through the device into the carburetor.

` Means to prevent reentrainment of the separated dirt particles into the moving air stream are herein provided, such preferably including a generally horizontally air-stream splitting plate II p which extends transversely between the side walls I'Ia and intermediate the bottom wall IIb and the bridge piece IId of the vbottom section.

so as to divide the air passage throughout the lower portion of .its loop or spiral formation and form a major or main air stream and a lesser air stream, the latter owing' relatively outwardly of the main air stream. As illustrated in Fig. 3, the splitting plate II p preferably'terminates in a rear edge which is disposed slightly to the rear of the outlet .tube IIf, although under certain conditions the plate may curve upwardly to terminate at or near the meeting line I2. The rela` tively forward portion of the plate is curved upwardly and terminates in a horizontal edge corresponding to the meeting line I2 to engage, when the sections are assembled, the lower edge of the partition If of the upper section.

As will be seen from the directional arrows of Fig. 3, theentering air stream in its downward course of travel is given a pronounced centrifugal motion, with effective dirt separation taking place in that portion of the air passage wherein the air moves downwardly and forwardly, with the dust particles being thrown relatively outwardly. Thereafter the air stream is split by the plate Ilp,v the major body of air moving above the plate and being deflected by the upper face thereof and thereafter by the under face of the arched bridge piece IIJd towards the opening IIe constituting the inlet to the vertical outlet tube II f. Thus the dirt particles separated as in the foregoing are acted upon only by the lesser body or stream of air which iiows in the space between .the upper surface of the wall I Ib and the under face of the splitting plate IIp.

The lesser and relatively outer air stream moves forwardly along its path of travel and thence upwardly, and thereupon rejoins the main air stream upon passing over the upper edge of the partition If. It will be noted that the air opening IIlg through which the lesser air stream rejoins the main stream is at a relatively high point in the loop-shaped path of air travel, and that the air passing through said opening must substantially reverse its direction of flow. Hence the dirt particles tending to move forwardly with the lesser air stream particularly when the air is moving at high velocity due to high engine speeds, are thrown outwardly and relatively forwardly by centrifugal action and thereupon fall into the chamber 30, in which they collect. Reentrainment of the separated dirt particles into the main air stream is accordingly prevented.

To further assist in the collection of the separated dirt particles, a dust-trapping substance such as oil may be maintained in chamber 30 at a level determinedpy tile height of the up or dam IIh. Preferably an excess of oil is employed so that when the automobile is on level ground, with the engine cut off or operating at a low R. P. M., the excess oil collects in the lower portion of the air passage, that is to say, rearl wardly of the dam IIh. This excess oil in the air passage functions to collect dirt particles falling or otherwise moving to the lower portion of the air passages. As the engine is started and/or its speed increased, the velocity of the air moving in the passage is also increased, the air now tending to move the excess oil forwardly with it, thus to spread the excess oil over the upper surface of the dam IIh and hence to increase the area of the oil-coated surfaces on which the dust particles may collect. At high engine speeds and consequent high air velocity, the air blows the excess oil forwardly into the chamber 30, from whence it strives to return by gravity to the lower level air passage against the action of the moving air stream. The upward and thence rearward path of air travel prevents the excess oil from theair passageor oil from the chamber SII, as well as dust particles trapped thereby, from moving onward from the air stream. i

Under ordinary driving conditions where up and down grades are encountered, oil continuously moves from the chamber 30 to the lower level portion of the air passage and back to the chamh ber. Thus when the automobile is being driven on an up grade, oil in quantity depending on the inclination flows over dam IIh from the chamber 30 to the air passage. Oil in the passage returns to the chamber when the automobile is thereafter driven on a down grade. Thus a continual wash or circulation of the oil from the chamber to the passage and back to the chamber takes place, whereby the' oil in the passage is being continually replenished by oil from the chamber and whereby the relatively contaminated oil in the passage is returned to the chamber, where the dust particles separate out and are trapped, being prevented from returning to the air passage by the over-hang of the dam I I h.

The present invention further contemplates a simple means of securing the assembled body as described to the carburetor, in such manner that rattling and vibration noises are reduced to a minimum. To eiect this advantageous result, I force-fit into the vertical outlet tube I If a sheet steel tube 20, the lower portion of which is flared outwardly and is provided with axial incisions for flexibility. A securing band (not shown) may be disposed about the lower end of the tube 20 which in turn is adapted to be located about the intake tube of the carburetor and, upon suitable fastening, there results a simple yet effective form of securing the device to the carburetor.

It will be apparent from the above description, that the present invention provides a combined supercharger and air cleaner embodying the advantageous features of the above-referred to application Serial No. 189,692, while at the same time contemplates construction and design features of advantage which will be apparent to one skilled in the art. Thus, the sectional construction permits the formation of sections, preferably in integral manner, by conventional casting and/'or metal working practices while at the same time permits of ready assembly. Further, the arrangement is such that dirt particles separated from the moving air stream by centrifugal action are effectively collected and prevented from re entrainment in the `Aair stream even under conditions of high engine speed, whereby the cleaning function of the device is materially enhanced. Again, the present invention teaches simple means of securing the device as a whole to the carburetor, without the necessity of complicated securing means and without undesirable rattling and vibration noises as might normally occur over long running periods. Accordingly, a device of superior quality, workmanship and operation is provided.

As many changes could be made incarrying out the above construction without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown inthe accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not inra limiting sense.

We claim:

l. A combined supercharger and air cleaner for attachment to the air intake of a carbureter,

comprising a structure providing an air passage having a substantially horizontal inlet portion, a substantially vertical outlet portion, a connecting passage portion in the form of a spiral, said passage being of gradually decreasing section whereby to increase the forward velocity of the yair flowing therethrough, the connecting portion of the passage curving downwardly and forwardly from said inlet portion and thence upwardly and rearwardly to ,said outlet portion whereby dirt particles are thrown outwardly by centrifugal action, and means disposed relatively forwardly of and adjoining the upwardly and rearwardly curved portion of the air passage providing a chamber opening into the aforesaid passage portion, the chamber constituting a reservoir for a dust-trapping liquid adapted to flow between the reservoir and the lower portion of the air passage, a portion of the passage wall forming a dam for normally retaining the bulk of the liquid in the reservoir.

2. A combined supercharger and aircleaner for attachment to the air intake of a carbureter, comprising a structure providing an air passage having a substantially horizontal inlet portion, a substantially vertical outlet portion, a connecting passage portion in the form of a spiral, said passage being of gradually decreasing sec-' tion whereby to increase the forward velocity of the air flowing therethrough, the connecting portion of the passage curving downwardly and forwardlyfrom said inlet portion to a lower passage portion and thence upwardly and rearwardly to said outlet portion whereby dirt particles are thrown outwardly by .centrifugal action, and means disposed relatively forwardly of and adjoining the upwardly and rearwardly curved portion of the air passage and constituting a preventing their subsequent reentrainment in the air stream. 4. A combined supercharger and air cleaner ,for attachment to the air intake of a carbureter comprising upper and lower complementary sectionsf means for securing lthe sections .together in assembled relation, the assembled sections providing an air passage including a substantially horizontal inlet portion,- a substantially verticall y the connecting portion of the passage curving downwardly from said inlet portion to a lower passage portion and thence upwardly and rearwardly to said outlet portion whereby dirt particles are thrown outwardly by centrifugal action, and the assembled sections further providing a chamber disposed forwardly of and adjoining the upwardly and rearwardly curved portion of the air passage, the relatively outer wall of the adjacent passage portion being cut away to provide opening between the passage portion and the chamber which is disposed above the lower passage portion, whereby a portion ofthe air stream moves in a generally upward direction through the chamber and whereby dirt particles moving along the outer wall of the air passage or otherwise carried by the air stream are thrown outwardly therefrom and collected in said charnreservoir for a dust-trapping liquid adapted to circulate. between the reservoir and the lower portion of the air passage, a portion of the passage wall betweenthe upwardly curved passage portion and the reservoir .being cut away to provide communication between said passage por- Y tion and the reservoir and the remaining portion of the passage wall forming'a dam for normally retaining the bulk of the. liquid in the reservoir, y

3. A combined supercharger and air cleaner for attachment to the air intake of a carbureter comprising upper and lower complementary sections, means for securing the sections together in assembled relation, the assembled sections providing an air passage having a substantially horizontal inlet portion, a substantially vertical outlet portion, a connecting passage portion in the formof a spiral, said passage being of gradually decreasing section whereby to increase the forward velo-city of the air flowing therethrough, the connecting portion of the passage curving downwardly from said inlet portion to a lower vpassage portion and thence upwardly and rearber. Y Y

5. A combined supercharger and air cleaner for attachment to the air intake of a carbureter comprising upper and lower complementary sections, means for securing the sections together.

in assembled relation, the assembled sections providing an air passage including a substantially horizontal inlet portion, a substantially vertical 4outlet portion, a connecting passage portion inA the form of a spiral, said passage being of gradually decreasing section whereby to increase the forward velocity of the air owing therethrough,

the connecting portion of the passagecurving downwardly and forwardly from said inlet portion to a lower passage portion and then-ce upwardly and rearwardly to .said outlet portion whereby dirt particles are thrown outwardly by centrifugal action, -means dividing the air flowing through the connecting portion of said passage Vinto an outer stream and an inner stream, and

achamber disposed forwardly. of and communieating with the upwardly and rearwardly curved portion of the passage portion through an opening in the outer wall of the upwardly curved pas-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2808893 *Jun 24, 1953Oct 8, 1957Harley A DormanSuperchargers for engines of automotive vehicles
US3371471 *Oct 15, 1965Mar 5, 1968Avco CorpSand and dust collector for engine air inlets
US4058096 *Feb 18, 1975Nov 15, 1977Stephen Edward BrownApparatus and method for increasing the horsepower of an internal combustion engine
US4373940 *Jan 29, 1982Feb 15, 1983Medalie Manufacturing Co.Air precleaner for internal combustion engine
US6941926Jan 20, 2004Sep 13, 2005Jeffrey A. FagalaAir intake system for an internal combustion engine
US8007554 *Feb 21, 2007Aug 30, 2011Giovanni BercichApparatus and method for the purification of air entering animal transport vehicles
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/316, 55/461, 55/466, 55/383
International ClassificationF02M35/16
Cooperative ClassificationF02M35/10118, F02M35/10157, Y02T10/146, F02M35/02, F02M35/10013, F02M35/10262, F02M35/161, Y02T10/144
European ClassificationF02M35/16B, F02M35/10A2, F02M35/10E2, F02M35/10D8, F02M35/10K6