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Publication numberUS2267711 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1941
Filing dateFeb 9, 1940
Priority dateFeb 9, 1940
Publication numberUS 2267711 A, US 2267711A, US-A-2267711, US2267711 A, US2267711A
InventorsBailey Stanley J
Original AssigneeSpencer Lens Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binocular
US 2267711 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1941- s. J. BAILEY 2,267,711

BINOCULAR Filed Feb. 9, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVFNTOR Dec. 30, 1941.

Filed Feb. 9, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 6'1 "11 56 L HHI IHIII 8F 44 \ll 5 17 p38 46 13 INVENTOR Patented Dec. 30, 1941 nmooonAn I j Stanley]. liaileyysnyder,

* -Spencer LensCompany, Buffalo, N.

poration of New York Application February 9, 1940, Serial No. 318,128

SOIaims.

This invention relates tobinoculars and more particularly to improved means and method fo connecting the parts thereof.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide improved means and method for connecting the parts of a binocular which will be more economical to manufacture and assemble.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved eyepiece for binoculars and improved means and method for securing the said eyepiece to the other parts of the binoculars.

' Another object is to provide animproved hinge means for binoculars whichwill prevent corrosion and provide a more durable construction and thereby lengthen considerably the period of Another object is to provide such a device wherein the various members are so associated that they function as an body of the binoculars.

With prior art constructions of binoculars there have been a number of difficulties with the hinge members. If the parts wore, there was no way of compensating for the wear and the entire binocular had to be discarded. Occasionally, dirt or water would work its way into the hinge members and corrosion would occur, ruining the binocular. Another diiliculty was that the parts were difllcult to assemble requiring considerable hand fitting of the parts and skilled help was required for this purpose making the cost of asintegral part of the sembllng'a very considerable portion of the cost, '01 the finished product.

In prior constructions there was also trouble caused by dust or water seepinginto the casings necessity of skilled help, audit is practically 1mpossible for dirt or water to seep in the hinge joints or casings and corrosion is thereby pre- N. Y., assignor to Y., a cor- Referring to the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a pair of binoculars showing the hinge member in section.

Fig. 2 is an end view of the binocular.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-9 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Iii)

' construction wherein the parts may very easily and economically assembled without the vented. Also the hinge means can easily and quickly be adjusted to compensate for any wear on the parts.

Fig. 5'is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but showing a modification of the invention; 1

.Fig. 7 isan end view of the binoculars shown inFig. 6;. V I I Fig. 8 is a sectionalview taken on line 8-9 of Fig; 6 lOOkillg in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 6 looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Fig. 10 is a sectional view taken on line ill-l0 of Fig. 6 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the device embodying the invention comprises apair of casings land 2 which contain the prisms 3 and to which are secured the eyepieces 4.

The casings l and 2, each containing an optical system are pivotally secured together to allow the casings to be adjusted or spaced apart so that theeyepieces are spaced apart the necessary pupillary distance to meet the requirements of the particular user, and also this adjustment may be quickly and easily varied to meet the requirements of other users and yet the adjusting means are so constructed as to prevent loosening or corrosion of the parts as set forth above.

The casing i is preferably made or molded of metal and the ears or extensions 5 and 6 are formedintegral therewith. These ears 5 and 6 are provided with cut back or grooved portions 1 and 8 respectively which portions contain the cocentric perforations 9 and i 9. 1

The casing 2 is also preferably made or molded of metal and the ears or extensions H and I2 and the tubular connecting portion l3 having the cylindrical bore I4 are formed integral therewith. The extensions H and I! have grooved portions so formedas to interflt with the grooved portions 1 and 8 of the extensions 6 and 6 on the casing I.

The outer faces or ends of the extensions II and I! are formed with circular grooves l5 and I9 around the ends 10! the cylindrical'bore H into which are adapted to be secured'by friction or the like tubular bushings or bearing member I! V and lubricated; that is, impregnated with .will be obvious from .flt the portions 1 and 8 provide the desired tension and I8 which are preferably formed of bronze v graphite or other lubricant. These members l1 and I8 are pressed or forced into the circular grooves l5 and I6 and as stated above are retained therein by friction.

The said circumferential bearing members l1 and I8 are provided with the tapered inner faces I! and 20. r

The pivot post or member 2| is then inserted into the bore l4 of the tubular connecting portion through the openings in the member H and has a tapered shoulder portion 23 which engages and bears against the tapered bearing member The tubular member 22 is adapted to fit into the bore M from the opposite end and through the opening H) in the member 5. and

engage in telescoping relation with the end of the member 2|. This member 22 also has a tapered shoulder or portion 24 adapted to engage the tapered face 20 of thebearing member l8.

These members 2| and-22 are preferably formed of nickel silver, bronze or some other composition having similar properties.

I have found that by making the pivot members of a bronze bearing lubricated or impregnated with graphite or other lubricant and having a tapered surface which engages a tapered edge of a bushing of nickel silver, bronze or the like the pivot connection between the parts will possess qualities overcoming the .d'efects in prior art constructions.

The telescoping members 2| and 22 are formed with eccentric head portions 25 and 26 of substantially D cross section asshown in Fig. 3. This prevents rotation-of the'membersfl and 22 and secures all of the parts together as though they were formed integral with the casings I and 2.

On the heads 25'and 26 of the members 2| and 22 are secured the caps 21 and 28 by screws or the like 29 and 30 which screw into openings in the ends of said tain the parts in adjusted position.

By adjusting the screw 30 the desired tension may be obtained on the bearing members. It

ening'the screw 30, the telescoping member 25 will be drawn through the aligned openings in v the members 5, I3 and 6. In this way, any

desired amount of tension or friction can be obtained between the-tapered bearing faces l9 and 20 on the circumferential bearing/members l1 and I8 and the respective tapered faces 23'" and 24 on the members 2| and 22.] Also, any dust onmoisture is prevented from entering the hinge connection. v

This construction is particularly adapted and constructed so. as to be easily, economically and quickly assembled. It is only necessary to'interwith the portions H and 12 with the openings in each of these members in aligned relation with the bore in the connecting portion II The member 2| is then inserted in place with its tapered shoulder eng ing the tapered face I9 of the bearingmemher and the member 22 inserted into the opening in the member 8 so as to be. in telescoping engagement with the end of the member 2| and with its tapered shoulder engaging the adjacent tapered face 20 of the bearing member la. The caps 21 and. 28 arethen secured in place by the screws 29'and so which are then tightened to between the hinge members 2| and 221 tofre-/ the drawings that by tightto desired adjusted focus.

which supports "the screw or the like 5|.

' compensate therefor.

members. It will be apparent that any slight adjustment or difference in size of the parts will be readily compensated for by the tapered shoulders and bearing members.

In the construction shown and'lO, the casing is formed with the extensions 5 and 6 and the casing 2is formed with the extensions H and I2 and has the integral tubular connecting portion l3, having the cylindrical bore l4, similar to the construction shown in Fig. 1. In this construction the ends of the cylindrical bore H are also provided with the bronze bearing members or l8 impregnated with graphite or other lubricant similar to the construction shown in Fig, 1.

In this construction the eyepieces as and u are H simultaneously through adapted to be. adjusted the crosspiece 35 which is moved back and forth through movement of the thumb wheel 36 to focus the lenses.

The member 31 formed of nickel silver, bronze or the like has the tapered shoulder 38 adaptedto bear against the bearing member l1 and its other end extending into the bore of the nickel silver telescoping member 22 which has the tapered shoulder portion 24 hearing against 'the bearing l8 and held in place by the cap 4| which. has the screw 42 secured to the end of the member 31. The member 31 has its head- 43 of substantially a D end of the member 5. The eccentric or D- shaped member 22 fits in the similar shaped opening in the member '6. This prevents movement of the parts as previously described inconnection with the (construction. shown in Fig. l.

The member 44 has the threaded portion 45 adapted to engage the threads on the interior of the hollow portion 46 of the member 31 and when the thumb wheel 35 is turned these threaded portions cooperate to move the member 44 back and forth and thereby move the eyepieces The member 44 also has a shoulder portion which is held in portion secured to the member48;by

This arrangement allows the pivoting of the casings to proper pupillary distance for the user as heretofore ,described. V

With the form of construction shown and described it is possible first to prevent and minimize wear or play in the parts caused by repeated are held thereon by the cap 49 of the member v44 is adjustment thereof and should'such wear occur,

the parts can be easily and quickly adjusted to Also it is possible to vary the tension on the contacting bearing surfaces of the,pivoti'ng parts to desired amount because .of the tapered bearing connections. Also, it, will.

be readily apparent that because. of the'tapered bearing surfaces the parts maybe quickly'and easily assembled without the trouble and expense incurredin assembling prior constructions.

In the construction of the eyepiece'shownin section in the left hand side of Figure l, and which is shown so adapted that the eyepiece may be adjusted by a thumb wheel type of binocular similar to that shown in Figure 6, althoughthe connection between the similar in both types, the connection between the eyepiece and casing is 'a sealed joint preventing the entrance of dust or moisture into the interior of the casing.

In thls'construction the eyepiece tube 52 and in Figs. 6, '1. s, 9,

shape as is'the opening in the a the members 35 and which Aayepiece and casing is openings,

the lens tube 58 are connected by a bellows 54 which may be of metal, rubber or other suitable material which will prevent the entrance of air be prevented from entering the'casing and, there- 7 fore, no corrosion can occur or damage to the surfaces of the lenses in the casing thereby obviating disadvantages found, in 'prior' art constructions.

From the foregoing, provided simple, eihcient and economical means for accomplishing all of the objects of the in-.

' vention and overcoming many of the disadvantages of prior art types of binoculars, and where-- by the parts may be made and assembled more quickly and inexpensively than was possible with prior constructions.

Having described my invention, I claim: 1. In a binocular,, a. hinge connecting the telescopes of said binocular comprising a pair of outer and a. pair'of inner arms, the hinge arms of one of the single telescopes being outer ones and those of the other single telescope being inner ones, each of said arms having openings adapted to be aligned with the op'enings'in the other of said arms, the inner arm's'having tapered bearing surfaces surrounding the said openings on their outer sides, a pair of telen will be seen that 1 have surfaces surrounding the said openings on their outer sides, a pair of bronze telescoping-pivot members adapted to extend intoysaid aligned openings, one from each end thereof, and having tapered bearingzfaces adapted to engage the tapered bearing faces on said arms, and means for locking said telescoping members in telescoping relation with each other with their ,tapered bearing faces in engagement with the tapered bearing faces on said arms to retain said telescopes in adjusted relation with each other.

4.- In a binocular, a hinge connecting the telescopes of said binocular comprising a pair of outer and a pair of inner arms, the hinge arms of one of the single telescopes being outer ones and those of the other single telescope being inner ones, each of said arms having openings adapted to be aligned with the openings in the other of said arms, the inner arms having lubri- 20 cated tapered bearing surfaces surrounding the said openings on their outer sides, a pair of telescoping pivot members adapted to extend into said aligned openings, one from each end thereof, and having tapered bearing faces adapted to engage the tapered faces on said'arms, and means for locking saidtelescoping members in telescoping relation with each other with their tapered bearing faces in engagement with the tapered bearing faces on said arms to retain said telescopes in adjusted pivotal relation with each other. I

5. In a binocular, a hinge connecting the telescopes of said binocular comprising a pair of scoping pivot members adapted to extend into said aligned openings, one from each end thereof, and having tapered bearing faces adapted'to engage thetapered bearing faces on said arms,

and means for locking said telescoping mem- .,bers in telescoping relation with each other with their tapered bearing faces in engagement with the tapered bearing faces on said arms to retain said telescopes in adjusted pivotal relation 'outer sides, a pairof nickel silver telescoping pivot members adapted to extend intosaid aligned one from each end thereof, and having tapered bearing faces adapted to engage the tapered bearing faces on said arms, and means for locking saidtelescoping members in telescoping relation with each other with their tapered bearing faces in engagement with the tapered bearing faces on said arms to retain said telescopes in adjustedv pivotal relation yith each other.

3. In a binocular, a-hinge connecting the telescopes ofsaid binocular comprising a pairof outer and a pair of inner arms, the hinge arms outer and a pair of inner arms, the hinge arms of one of the single telescopes'being outer ones and those of the other single telescope being inner ones,'each of .said, arms having openings adapted to be aligned with the openings in the other of said arms, the inner arms having lubricated tapered bearing surfaces surrounding the said openings on their outer ides, a: pair of nickel silver telescoping pivot mbers adapted to extend into said aligned openings, one from-each end thereof, and having tapered bearing faces adapted to engage the tapered bearing faces on said arms, and means for locking said telescoping members in telescoping relation with each other with their tapered bearing faces in engagement with the tapered bearing faces on said arms to retain said telescopesin adjusted pivotal relation with eachother.

other single telescope being inner of one of the single telescopes being outer ones and those of the other single telescope being inner ones, each of said arms having fopenings adapted to be aligned with the openings in the other of 6. In a binocular, a hinge connecting the telescopes of said binocular comprising a pair of outer and apair of inner arms, the hinge arms of one of the single telescopes being outer ones and those of the other single telescope being inner ones, each of saidarms having openings adapted to be aligned with the openings in the other of said arms, the inner arms having lubricated taperedbe'aring surfaces surrounding the said openings on their outer sides, a pair of bronze telescoping pivot members adapted to extend into said aligned openings, one from each end thereof, and having tapered bearing faces adapted to engage the tapered bearing faces on said arms, and meansfor locking said telescoping members in telescoping relation with each other "with their tapered bearing" faces in engagement saidarms, the inner arms having tapered bearing 7 ing openings adapted to be aligned with the openings in the other of said arms, the inner arms having tapered bearing surfaces surroundin: the said openings on their outer sides, a pair of telescoping pivot members adapted to extend into said aligned openings, one from each end thereof, and having tapered bearing faces adapted to engage the tapered bearing faces on said.

arms, and means for locking said telescoping members in telescoping relation with each other with their tapered bearing faces in engagement with the tapered bearing faces on said arms to retain said telescopes in adjusted pivotal rela-' tion with each other.

8. In a binocular, a hinge connecting the telescopes of said binocular comprising a pair of outer and a pair of inner arms, each of said arms having openings adapted to be aligned with the openings in the other of said arms, the inner arms having tapered bearing surfaces sur-'-' rounding the said openings on one side of said arms, a pair of telescoping pivot members adapt ed to be extended into said aligned openings, one

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2424282 *Nov 3, 1943Jul 22, 1947Bendix Aviat CorpBody and modified first porro type erecting system for telescopic instruments
US2454859 *Oct 25, 1944Nov 30, 1948Universal Camera CorpWater- and weatherproofing construction of casings for binoculars
US4867533 *Feb 27, 1986Sep 19, 1989Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedFriction lock for optical adjustment
US5062698 *Jan 25, 1991Nov 5, 1991Asahi Kogaku Kogyo K.K.Focusing device for a binocular instrument
DE102004037481A1 *Jul 27, 2004Mar 23, 2006Hensoldt AgBinocular field glasses comprises a bridge for joining the tubes of the field glasses and having a first sleeve-like hinge part and a second hinge part with a bolt protruding into the first hinge part
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/414, 16/273, 16/340
International ClassificationG02B23/18
Cooperative ClassificationG02B23/18
European ClassificationG02B23/18