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Publication numberUS2268133 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1941
Filing dateJun 17, 1938
Priority dateJun 17, 1938
Publication numberUS 2268133 A, US 2268133A, US-A-2268133, US2268133 A, US2268133A
InventorsRobert W Carlson
Original AssigneeRobert W Carlson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric timing device
US 2268133 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. 'W. CARLSON ELECTRIC TIMING DEVICE Filed June 17, 1938 2 Shee ts-Sheet 1 2*- I INVENTOR ROBERT WCARLS N BY 0 I Wk ATTOR-NEYS Dec; 3@, m1. R, W, ARLS'O 2,268,133

ELECTRIC TIMING DEVICE Filed June l7, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I I I M I M INVENTOR ROSE/QT W. CARLso/v ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 30, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT ol-"rlciz I nnsc'raro imo DEVICE I Application June 17, lilzflssirfllfo. 214,389

4 Claims.

This invention relates to an electrical timing device and refers more particularly to a device operated by a clockwork mechanism for providing impulses of electrical energy at predetermined time intervals.

An object of the present invention is the pro vision of a timing device which is simple in construction, easy to manufacture and reliable in operation.

Another object is the provision of an automatically operable'timing device which may be used for emitting time signals at predetermined intervals, for example, for radio broadcasting purposes. 7

Other objects will be apparent in the course of the following specification.

The objects of the present invention may the realized through the provision of movable elements such as discs or, drums, which are driven by a clock-work mechanism at different speeds and are provided with portions which are permeable to light, such as open portions or apertures, and which may be brought into alinem'ent between a source of light and a light sensitive cell at a predetermined time, whereby said cell upon receivingthe light beamprovides an electrical current which is amplified and caused to operate a relay or the like.

The invention will appear more clearly from the following detailed description when taken in connection with accompanying drawings, showing by way of example, preferred embodiments of the inventive idea.

In the drawings:

Figure l is a diagrammatic view of the timing device constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention; Figure 2 is a view along the line 2-4, of Figure 1; V

Figure 3 is a diagram illustrating a timing device as used, for example, for the making of signals in radio broadcasting; and

Figure 4 is a diagram showing a timing device capable of operating severalcircuits.

The timing device shown in Figures 1 and 2 comprisesa support 5 having the form of a vertically disposed plate carried by the stand 6 and provided with an opening I which may be situatedin the lower part of the support 5.

A clockwork mechanism, preferably, an electric synchronous clock motor, which is generally designated by the numeral 8 in the drawings, is firmly connected with the stand 5 andcomprises shafts 9, i0, and II which extend through the support. In the construction shown in the drawa disc I2. rate of one ings, these shafts are concentrically disposed, although, obviously, eccentric shafts may be also used. The shaft 8 which would be normally connected to the seconds hand, is firmly connected with The shaft i0 which rotates at the revolution per hour is connected to another disc it which is situated behind the disc it. The shaft II which may rotate at the rate of one revolution every twelve hours carries the disc M; which is situated between the disc l3 and the support Ii. The shafts 9 to II are firmly connected with their respective discs, so that the discs may rotate with the same speed with which the hands of a clock are rotated.

Obviously, the discs are made of some material which is impermeable to the rays emitted by the source it; their number and their speed of rotation may be varied at will. For example, a device constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention may be used with only one disc or two discs, and through the use of a suitably geared mechanism the speed of the discs may be changed at will.

As shown in Figure 2, the discs I2 to it are provided with suitable apertures or portions it, which are permeable to source 16 and which are tain positions of the discs, these apertures are situated in alinement with each other front of the opening 1 formed in the support 5.

' An electrical lamp l6 or any other suitable source of visible or invisible rays is situated opposite the opening 1 formed in the support 5. The lamp I6 is preferably enclosed in a casing I! which is provided with an opening 3 carrying a focusing ilens l9. Theopening I8 is situated directly opposite the opening 1, and the focusing lens i9 is so located that the light emitted by the lamp it will be transformed into'a narrow beam of light 24 which extends horizontally through the opening 1 when this opening is exposed by the apertures I 5 in the discs l2 to It.

A photoelectric or light-sensitive cell 20 is situat'ed in the path of the beam emitted by the lamp It on the opposite side of the support I. The light-sensitive cell 20 is'of standard construction and is illustrated diagrammatically in the drawing. The electrical circuit with the cell 20 includes anamplifier 2| and a relay or other suitable current-actuated device 22 which is used for the purpose of operating any suitable load circuit or signalling circuit indicated diagrammatically by the numeral 23 of the drawings.

the rays emitted by the I so located that in cerconnected 7 clockwork mechanism 2i tion of the time during which the cell 23 is actuated depends upon the time during which the beam of light 24 is allowed to reach the electric cell.

Through the use 'of a different number of discs H to M and through the provision of several apertures l3 on these discs, the time when the apertures of these discs will be inalinement with each other, thereby permitting the beam of light 23 to reach the light-sensitive cell 23 may be varied or regulated at will. At the same'time, the duration of the period of exposure also varied by varying the width of the aper tures it and/or the speed of rotation of the discs. By using large discs and an appropriate light source in, conjunction with a quick acting trigger circuit in the sensitive cell amplifier, it is possible to obtain a very large number of impulses per second. If however, as in the example shown in Figures 1 and 2, the discs 92 to M are rotated at the same speeds with which the hands of a clock are rotated, and if each one of them is provided with a single suitably located opening, the light-sensitive cell 23 will be actuated once every twelve hours. The duration of the impulse received by the cell it depends then upon the angular width of the openings 65. If the opening it? of the disc i2"rotating with the speed of one revolution per minute has an angular width. cor

responding to four degrees, the period of exposure will be two-thirds of a second.

As already mentioned, by a suitable selection. of the speed of rotation of the discs and oi the location and size of their apertures, it is possible to provide an impulse at practically any desired ti- -e interval and for any selected duration.

Figure 3 illustrates diagrammatically a practical embodiment of the principles of the present invention. In this case the two discs 23 and 23 are to be used for the purpose of automatically producing a time signal for radio broadcasting purposes, this time signal consisting of one single buzz or sound on the hour and two short signals every half hour. The disc 25 is rotated by the revolution per hour, while the disc 2b is rotated by the same mechanism with the speed of one revolution per minute. The disc 23 is provided with an opening it, which issituated close to the periphery of the disc and which is adapted to be brought into alinement with two openings iii and 33 provided in the disc 23. In the example illustrated, each of the openings 2% and 33 has an angular width of four degrees and is separated from the other by an angle of four degrees.

Another opening 3i is provided in the disc 23 and is situated closer to the center of the disc than the openings 29 and 33. The disc 25 is provided with an opening 32 which is adapted to coincide with the opening 3i of the disc 23.

A light-sensitive cell 33 is situated on the level may be with the speed of one 7 cell 33, while the focussing lens 39 is situated opposite the cell 34. The beams of light 40 and 4| are produced by the lamps 42 and 43. i

The position of the discs 25 and 26 shown in V Figure 3 indicates the beginning of an hour. At

that time the two openings 3| and 32 are in alinement'with each other and with the ray of light 43. This ray of light which is concentrated by the focussing lens 38, will pass through the openings 3| and 32 in the discs 26 and 25 and will reach the light-sensitive cell 33. thereby energizing the cell. The current produced by the cell 33 will be amplified by the amplifier 35 and, will actuate the relay 36, thereby producing a signal in the circuit 31. If the-angular width of the opening 3| is four degrees, the time of passage of this opening 3| in front of the lens 38 will be such that the light-sensitive cell 33 will be subjected to theray 01 light ll! during two-thirds of a second.

At that time, the beam of light 48 concentrated by the iocussing lens 33 will not reach the light-sensitive cell 3 25, since the disc 25 will prevent the passage of light to this cell.

At the expiration of the time interval of twothirds of a second, the opening 3i will move away from the beam of light 3c, so that the light will not be able any more to reach the cell 33.

The disc 2% will continue its rotation, making one complete revolution in one minute. The disc 23, which rotates simultaneously with the disc 23, will complete one-sixtieth of a complete revolution during that minute. oi the disc will be sumcient to shift the open" ing 32 in relation to the direction of the beam of light lit, so that when the opening 3i again ap pears in front oi the beam of light it, this light will be prevented now from reaching the cell After the expiration of half an hour, the disc 23 will complete half a revolution and the opening will be moved into the path oi the ray of light ill. When at this time the opening 33 will appear within the path of the beam of light ll, a signal, the duration of which depends upon the width oi the opening 363, will be received in the circuit 3?, since the cell 33 will be energized by the beam 6 l. After the opening 33 has passed beyond the beam ill, the opening at will appear in front of the beam and the cell 3 5 will be energized for the second time, so that a second signal will be received in the circuit iii. If the angular width of the openings and 33 is four degrees and they are situated four degrees apart, two impulses will be produced, which are two thirds of a second apart and each of which is two thirds of a second in duration, the'entire operation taking place in two seconds. Therefore, due to the described arrangement, the circuit 3? will receive one single signal every hour and two short signals every half hour.

The timing device shown in Figure 4 comprises a disc M which is rotated by the mechanism 45 of the openings 3! and 32 while a second lightsensitive cell 34 is situated on the level of the openings 28, 29 and 33. The cells 33 and 344 are connected with each other; with an amplifier 35 A focussing lens 33- is situated opposite the and which is provided with a large opening 45 and a smaller opening 4?. A source of light 48 transmits a beam of light through one of these openings to a light-sensitive cell 49 which is connected to the grid 53 of the vacuumtube iii of the amplifier. The plate 52 of the vacuum tube 5! is connected with several relays 53 and be which are adjusted to operate at different amounts of plate current.

When the small aperture 41 is situated in front of the beam of light 55, the smallest amount of plate current will be produced, which, for exam ple, will actuate the relay 53. When the aper- This movement I ture 41 is replaced by the aperture 46, a greater amount of light will fall on the cell 49 and, in turn, the cell 49 will actuate the grid 50 of the vacuum tube to a greater degree, resulting in a greater amount of plate current. The relay 54, for example, may be so adjusted that it will operate only when this greater plate current is available.

It is apparent that the specific illustrations shown above have been given by way of illustration and not by way of limitation, and that the structures above described are subject to wide variation and modification without departing from the scope or intent of the invention, all of which variations and modifications are to be included within the scope of the present invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination, a source of light, a plurality of discs having openings formed therein, said discs being movable relatively to each other and preventing the rays of light emitted by said source from falling directly on a light sensitive element except in at least one predetermined relative position of said elements, and a clockwork mechanism connected with said discs for moving the same relatively to each other to cause the occurrence of said predetermined position at a predetermined time.

2. A timing device for actuating a light sensitive device by a ray of light at predetermined time intervals, said timing device comprising a support having an opening formed therein for the direct passage of said ray from a source to said light sensitive device, a plurality of discs impermeable to said ray and having inner open portions adapted to aline with said opening to form a passage for said ray, and a clockwork mechanism connected with said support and said discs and rotating said discs at different speeds to bring the open portions of the discs into alinement with said opening at predetermined time intervals.

3. In combination, at least one source of light, a plurality of elements preventing the rays of light emitted by said source from falling directly on a light sensitive element except in predetermined relative positions of said elements, and a clock-work mechanism connected with said elements for moving them at different speeds to cause the occurrence of said predetermined relative positions at predetermined time intervals.

4. In combination, a source of light, at least one element interposed between said source of light and a light sensitive device and causing the rays of light from said source to illuminate said light sensitive device with various degrees of intensity to create electrical currents of different intensity corresponding to the intensity oi the illuminations, means connected with said element for actuating the same to cause the occurrence or such flluminations at predetermined time intervals, and current-responsive means connected with said light sensitive device and selectively operated by said currents of difierent intensity.

ROBERT W. CARLSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2424858 *Jan 25, 1945Jul 29, 1947Senn Jurg AColorimeter
US2460163 *Apr 15, 1947Jan 25, 1949Bowen Ira SProjectile flight recording multiple exposure camera
US2467661 *Apr 29, 1946Apr 19, 1949Ment Jack DeUltraviolet stroboscope
US2562181 *Nov 5, 1948Jul 31, 1951Frommer Joseph CMethod and means for detecting cloudiness of transparent material
US2583373 *May 27, 1948Jan 22, 1952Jr John Hays HammondSelective remote-control system
US2593905 *Mar 17, 1948Apr 22, 1952Lux Clock Mfg Company IncTimer
US2611232 *Nov 21, 1947Sep 23, 1952Casco Products CorpCyclometer clock alarm
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Classifications
U.S. Classification250/206, 73/1.45, 359/233, 361/175, 200/33.00R, 250/233, 968/588, 73/DIG.110
International ClassificationG04C21/16
Cooperative ClassificationG04C21/16, Y10S73/11
European ClassificationG04C21/16