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Publication numberUS2269032 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 6, 1942
Filing dateOct 25, 1939
Priority dateOct 25, 1939
Publication numberUS 2269032 A, US 2269032A, US-A-2269032, US2269032 A, US2269032A
InventorsDavis Moore William
Original AssigneeAmerican Cast Iron Pipe Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for coating and wrapping pipe
US 2269032 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 6, 1942. I w. D. MOORE 2,259,032

APPARATUS FOR COATING AP ID WRAPPING PIPE Filed 001?. 25, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 i INVENTOR z'fizllacmz, D. 1%,

ATTORNEY.

Jan. 6, 1942. w. D. MOORE 2,269,032

APPARATUS FOR COATING AND WRAPQING PIPE I Filed Oct. 25, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR M'Zlz'czm D. More Jan. 6, 1942. w. D. MOORE 2,269,032

APPARATUS FOR COATING AND WRAPPING PIPE Filed 001:. 25, 19:59 3 Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR Mallzam D. More Patented Jan. 6, 1942 srrsasros roa A 2,259,032 OFFICE warm Davis mom. ab... alaignor Americanv Cast Iron Pipe. 7 ming'ham,Ala.,aeotporation0i Company, Bib

- Application October 25,1939, Serial No. 301,261

8Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for coating and wrapping pipe. and among other objects aims to provide an improved machine for coating and wrapping metal pipe with a layer of cementitious material on the outside thereof, whereby external corrosion of the pipe is reduced or prevented. Oi the common forms of underground corrosion attacking pipe lines, one'of the more troublesome is the galvanic type of corrosion such as that caused by oxygen concentrationv cells in which a current is induced between well aerated and poorlyaerated sections of the pipe wall. The 'outer layer of cementitious material applied by the apparatus of the invention will practically prevent this type of corrosion. Chemical corrosion of the pipe wall by strongly acid or so-called'alkali soils is also largely nullifled by the protective coating. Where the pipe line is subjected to the action of stray current electrolysis the protective layer reduces the intensity of the attack by preventing localizationof this type of action.

It is well known that cast iron pipe, under ordinary conditions, will last for over 100 years. Under certain unusual conditions, any metallic structure, even cast iron pipe, will fail because of 'electro-chemical action. To meet such unusual conditions it is highly advantageous to provide,

metallic pipe with a protective outer layer of material which is relatively inert chemically and which will prevent or reduce the attack due to any electrical or chemical action known to occur.

in the soil. According to the present invention, apparatus is provided which is advantageously used at the pipe factory for coating pipe with a layer of reinforced cement mortar of substantial thickness, thus protecting the outer surface of the pipe against corrosion.

The present application is a companion to an application filed by me on the same day, Ser.

No. 301,268 describing and claiming the preferred process, while the product thereof is claimed in my pending application, Serial No. 402,527, a division of application Serial No. 301,268.

In the accompanying drawings forming a part or this specification- Flg. 1 is a side elevation of the preferred ap-- paratus, showing a pipe in position for coating and wrapping;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view;

Fig. 3 is an end elevation;.

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectionon line H of Fig. 1; and,

Fig. 5 is a sectional elevation of a slightly modified form of hopper which may be used with the apparatus fully shown in other figures.-

Referring particularly to the drawings, pipe length II is supported to rotate on its axis by any desirable means, for example the means shown in the drawings, said means comprising apair, of plugs l2 and "adapted to ht respectively into the bell and spigot ends of the pipe, each plug being shown as having set screws i4 1 engaging the inside of the' pipe with their. outer ends. The plugs l2 and I! have integral shaft extensions I21: and I20 and shaft extension I20 "pipe II is a car 28 which comprisesessentially may simply rest in abearing or journal ll, supported. by a stand I I. The shaft extension l2 is Joined by a shaft coupling II with a mechanical drive, here shown as comprising shaft",

a large pulley l9 secured on shaft il, a belt 2. driving the large pulley 'II, a small pulley 2| driving the belt, shaft 22 on which pulley 2| is mounted, -a speed reducer 23 driving shaft 22,, and a variable speed electric motor 24 coupled to the speed-reducer 22. .By the described construction, the pipe II is rotated at any speed desired on its axis, and yet may be easily removed and replaced by another pipe length.

Arranged to travel longitudinally above the a platform or truck, supported on four flanged wheels 28 which roll over a pair of rails 21 forming a track. Therails 21 are supported on aplurality of stands 22 and said rails are neces- T sarily parallel to the longitudinalaxis oi the pipe se that the car moves parallel to said axis. It is within the scope of the invention to arrange the parts so that the car travels on either side of the pipe. Carried upon the car 25 is .a bin or hopper 30 whose open top is adapted to receive cement mortar by gravity from a mixing machine or bin (not shown) which preferably is located above the car near one end of the machine. The lower or delivery end of the hopper is centered relative to the axis of the pipe, as best shown in Fig. 3, and the outlet of the hopper is preferably located notmore than an inch or so above the top of the pipe," as shown.

In accordance'with the invention, a strip of I coarse-meshed, loosely woven, water-absorbing cotton cloth is spirally wrapped under tension about the -pipe' ll, initially on the outside of the cement layer 2| deposited upon the pipefrom which because of its oil or waxy content actually v repels cement and thus cannot be integrally incorporated in the cementitious layer in accord ance with the process. 'I'he preferred cotton wrapping readily absorbs the moisture oi the I cement mortar and its fibers take up'part of the cement itself so' that the fabric ultimately becomes an integral part of the protective layer placed upon the pipe by the machine of the invention. Further advantage of such cotton wrapping is the fact that it will stretch when flrst absorbing moisture and will contract with 5 the cement as the latter sets, dries and hardens. thus obviating separation of the wrapping from the cement. In the aforesaid companion application, the cotton fabric is disclosed more fully.

The machine ofthe invention provides means to lay the described cotton fabric spirally about the pipe as the cement mortar is deposited on the top of the pipe. The strip of fabric 32 is rolled on a spool 33 removably carried upon a pair of brackets 34 secured to the platform of car 25. Thus a new supply of wrapping may be added from time to time. The strip 32 passes from the spool 33 to a concave roller 35 which has a flange 35a on the lead end. The edge of this flange is adapted to roll on the pipe Just in advance of the coating material as the latter is fed from the bin. Roller 35 is carried by a pivoted frame comprising a pair of parallel arms 36 having vertically adjustable pivotal connections 31 with two parallel, vertical hangers 38 5 secured to and depending from the car. Preferably the bin is also supported upon the two arms 86 by pivotal connections 3011 at its lower end (Fig. 3). Thus'the flange a on roll 35 regulates the height of the discharge end of 30 the bin above the top of the pipe; and if it is desired to vary the thickness of the cement layer, obviously a roll having a flange of a different height will replace the roll in use, or several sizes of flanges 35a may be attached at different times 35 of spool 33. Tension of spring 39 may be regu- 4O lated if desired. This or an equivalent resistance is very important because otherwise the cement mortar would not be forced through the interstices of the loosely woven fabric strip nor would the fabric strip by its tension force the layer of the cement firmly against the outer surface of the pipe. The frictional means shown and described is, of course, merely illustrative and more or less diagrammatic and other fabric-tensioning means known in the textile arts may be 5 employed.

To insure uniform and continuous travel of the car from one end of the pipe to the other, a power-driven, horizontal lead screw ll' extends the length of the machine and engages a nut 5 42 rigidly secured to the car. The lead screw is rotatably supported at its ends and at other points (not shown) if desired, and is driven as for example-by gears 43 and M (Fig. 1), gear 44 being secured to shaft l8. Thus movement of the car synchronously with rotation of the pipe is effected. In lieu ofthis arrangement the car may be pushed by hand along the track or it may be pulled back and forth by a poweractuated cable or may be otherwise driven.

Whether hand or machine operated, the movement of the car should be so governed that the cotton fabric is spirally wrapped with an overlap and this overlap may be approximately one inch for a medium size pipe. For a large pipe,

employing wider textile strips, the overlap would be larger. Due to the angle of the axis of the roll 35 (which may be varied by means not shown) also because of the tension imposed upon the material and the rotation of the pipe, the

car may be moved along the track without any power except that received through the textile strip; and in such a case, an attendant may restrain or advance the car, by hand, as seems necessary, keeping a constant eye on the wrapping operation.

To smooth out the surface of the pipe coating, thus eliminating any ridges or other irregularities, a roller 45 is rotatably mounted on a frame 48' hinged as at 41 to car 25, and is adapted to bear on the top of the coated pipe. The axis of rotation of roller ll preferably lies in the same vertical plane with the axisof the rotating pipe, and said roller may be heavy enough to exert a definite squeezing or ironing action. Obviously, roller ll need not be attached to the car, but could be separately carried, as from a monorail, not shown.

When the machine is to wrap a pipe, one end of the fabric strip is tied adjacent one end, preferably the bell end, of the pipe. Then the machine is started, and the car 111118 until thefabric' strip reaches the spigot end. The machine is stopped and the strip is then cut and wrapped by hand circularly around the spigot (leaving its extremity bare so that it may fit in a bell to make a tight joint) and is tied again. This may be done after removal of the pipe length from the machine. A poultice of cement mortar may be applied by hand to the outer surface of the wrapping if exposed at either'end of the pipe. After the pipe is laid in the trench, any uncovered portions at the joints will be completely coated with cement, to insure complete protection of the entire outer surface of the pipe. The described machine is ready to wrap a new pipe length when the car is returned to its initial starting point, as by reversing motor 24.

If desired, a pneumatic vibrator ,(not shown) which vibrates the side of the' hopper may be employed to prevent cement mortar from stick-.

ing to and setting upon the inside walls of the hopper. Preferably after the wrapping is completed, but before removal of the pipe length, a thin flnishing coat of cement mortar is either plastered by hand or sprayed by a spray gun upon the outer surface of the revolving coated pipe.

Referring to Fig. 5, there is shown a, modification of the hopper. Here the hopper 48 has a screw conveyor 49 at its lower end and extending through a hopper extension 50 to the discharge opening 5| which is directly above the top of the pipe (the same as in Fig. 3). The shaft of the screw conveyer is preferably driven by a variable speed motor and speed reducer (not shown) mounted on the car. This arrangement insures a more uniform feed of the cement mortar upon the pipe and is particularly desirable when using the same apparatus to coat different sizes of pipe,-as a 12 inch pipe will take many times the amount of cement mortar that is required to coat a 6 inch pipe.

A particular feature of the invention is the provision of means for insuring the imbedding of the coarse meshed fabric in the body of the cement mortar, which is brought about by the tensioning and feeding means for the fabric. It will be clear from Fig. 3 that the fabric is pressed by the weight of roller 35, plus the weight of the hopper and its charge of cement mortar, into the surface of the cement mortar layer 3| on the pipe; The tension on the fabric causes it to become integrally incorporated in the cement mortar layer, and this incorporation is perthe pipe; and conveyor means positively to feed fected by the ironing effect of roller 45. Thus the fabric may become so much a part of the cement layer that its strands may be practically indistinguishable from the cement, or may even be Completely hidden by an outer thin skin or layer of cement, as more fully disclosed in the companion application.

Among the advantages of the apparatus are,

- its simplicity, its adjustability, inexpensivencss scribed herein.

Having described a preferred embodiment of the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A machine of the class described comprising, in combination, a pipe support for holding pipe against any movement except rotation; means to rotate the pipe about its longitudinal axis while on said support; a traveling hopper having an outlet adjacent the pipe, said hopper being adapted to receive a supply 'of cement mortar and to discharge the same upon the rotating pipe; means for holding a supply of fabric; tensioning means for the fabric; means to feed the tensioned fabric to the pipe adjacent the point at which the cement mortar is dumped; the means for holding the supply of fabric comprising a spool which travels with the hopper; said fabric being guided by a roller to the upper part of the pipe; said roller traveling with the spool and having a flange whose edge has rolling contact with the surface of the pipe; and means for mounting said roller so that it may rise and fall on the surface-of the pipe.

2. A machine of the class described comprising, in combination, a pipe support for holding pipe against any movement except rotation;

frame; the fabric-feedingmeans comprising a roller also mounted on the frame, said roller having a flange which rides directly on the pipe adjacent the hopper outlet; and means for adjusting the position of the frame relative to the pipe, said means also adjusting the position of the roller relative to the pipe.

3. A machine of the class described comprising, in combination, a pipe support for holding pipe against any movement except rotation;-

means to rotate the pipe about its longitudinal axis while on said support; a traveling hopper having an outlet adjacent the pipe, said hopper being adapted to receive a supply of cement. mortar and to discharge the same upon the rotating pipe; 'means for holding a supply of fabric: tensioning means for the fabric; means to feed the tensioned fabric to the pipe adjacent the point at which the cement mortar is dumped; means being provided to support the hopper on the pipe with its outlet spaced from the top of cement mortar from the outlet of the hopper.

4. A machine of the class described comprising, in combination, a pipe support for holding pipe against any movement except rotation; means to rotate the pipe about its longitudinal axis while on said support; a traveling hopper having an outlet adjacent the pipe, said hopper being adapted to receive a supply of cement mortar and to discharge the same upon the rotating pipe; means for holding a supply of fabric;

tensioning means for the fabric; means tofeed the tensioned fabric to the pipe adjacent the point at which the cement mortar is dumped; the fabric-tensioning means comprising a frictionallresistance retarding rotation of a spool holding a supply of the fabric, and the fabricfeeding means comprising a roller which rides directly on the pipe adjacent the hopper outlet; means connecting the hopperwith said roller so that the hopper rises and falls with said roller; said fabric being led from the spool downwardly and part way around said roller and into contact with the cement mortar immediately after it is spread on top of'the pipe.

5. A machine of the class described comprising, in combination, a pipe support; means to rotate the pipe about its longitudinal axis while on the pipe support, said means preventing any movement of the pipe other than rotation; a hopper having an outlet, said hopper being adapted to hold a supply of cement mortar and to discharge the same through the outlet in a layer upon the outer surface of the pipe: means to support the hopper on the surface of the pipe, said hopper-supporting means gaging the thickness of the layer of cement mortar; means to move the hopper along the length of the pipe; means to hold a supply of coarse meshed, water- 'absorbent fabric: means to tension the fabric as it is fed to the pipe: and means to guide the fabric and assist in wrapping it around the pipe as the pipe is rotated, said fabric-guiding means bringing the fabric against and outside of the cement mortar adjacent the point where said mortar is discharged upon the pipe.

6. The invention according to claim 5 wherein and down relative to the'pipe and independently of the car.

7. The invention according to claim '5 wherein the means to move the hopper carries a frame one end of which is pivotally connected to the means to move the hopper; said pivotal connection being vertically adjustable thereby to vary the position of the frame relative to the pipe:

and means pivotally connecting said frame intermediate its ends to the lower portion of the hopper: said last named means being adjustable 'pipe in advance of the discharge of the cement mortar.

WILLIAM DAVIS MOORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2862276 *Nov 18, 1954Dec 2, 1958Botting Percy BPipe coating device
US2966715 *Jun 12, 1957Jan 3, 1961Vianini LuigiApparatus for the manufacture of multi-layer tubular bodies
US4533307 *Jan 27, 1984Aug 6, 1985Europaisches Laboratorium Fur Molekularbiologie (Embl)Apparatus for preparing thin gel slabs for electrophoresis
US4544426 *Oct 24, 1983Oct 1, 1985Shaw Industries Ltd.Method and apparatus for applying a coating material to a pipe
US5003918 *Dec 28, 1989Apr 2, 1991Interventional Technologies, Inc.Apparatus for manufacturing atherectomy torque tubes
US5888339 *Jun 7, 1996Mar 30, 1999Bredero Price CompanyApplicator apparatus for wrapping a joint of pipe with a web of concrete material
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/425, 425/111
International ClassificationB28B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28B19/0038
European ClassificationB28B19/00F