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Publication numberUS2269190 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 6, 1942
Filing dateNov 11, 1937
Priority dateNov 11, 1937
Also published asDE715413C
Publication numberUS 2269190 A, US 2269190A, US-A-2269190, US2269190 A, US2269190A
InventorsDunham George W
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Washing machine
US 2269190 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 6, 1942. G. w. DUNHAM 2,269,190

' WASHING mimmw I V Fiied Nov. 11, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 {L 3 :5: ill hi my E55 1! E5 M Inventor H: George W. Dunham,

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4; 43 M by W 5.)

His Atr'tiorneg.

Jan. 6, 1942. G. w. DUNHAM 2,269,190

WASHING'M'ACHINE k Filed Nov. 11, 1957 2 sheets-sheei 2 lnventcr-t George W.v Dunham;

by MMZM is Attorney.

Fatented Jan. 6. 1942 WASHING mourns George W. Dunham, Westport, Conn, assignor to v General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application November 11, 1937, Serial No. 173,987

6 Claims.

The present invention relates to washing machines of the type which may include a centrifugal extractor for drying the clothes.

The object of my invention is to provide an improved construction and arrangementin I washing machines and for a consideration of what I believe to be novel and my invention, attention is directed to the following description and the claims appended thereto.

In the accompanying drawing, Fig. 1 is an elevation, partly in section, of a washing machine embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional view of the driving connections for .the

agitator and'the rotatable receptacle as shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2 showing the clutch between the shaft and the receptacle in the disengaged position; Fig. 4 is a similar view showing the clutch in the engaged position; Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 55 of Fig. 1; Fig. 6 is a sectional elevation of the driving mechanism for the washing machine; Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 'l? of Fig. 6; and Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 6.

Referring to the drawings, the washing machine comprises a stationary tub i which is supported on a base 2. The upper end of the tub is partially closed by an annular cover 3 having a flange 4 which fits within the upper edge of th tub. Between the flange d and the tub is.

a suitable gasket 5. A cover 6 rests on the inner edge of the annular cover 3 and completes the closing of the top of the stationary tub. When clothes are to be inserted or removed from the washing machine, only the cover 8 need be removed. The cover 3 is removed when the inside of the stationary tub is to be cleaned. The

base 2 is provided with a skirt 7 which extends above the bottom of the stationary tub and covers the abutting edges of the tub and the base.

Within the base 2 is supported a driving mechanism, hereinafter described, for the washing machine which drives a vertical shaft 8. Keyedto the shaft 8 is a brake drum 9 which is connected by means of a suitable universal joint to the lower end of a vertical shaft l which extends through a sleeve II. The universal joint comprises diametrically opposed pins I 2 which are fixed in ears I3 on the upper side of the brake drum. The inner ends of the pins 2 are journaled in bearings I4 clamped between plates I which form the intermediate member of the universal joint. The lower end of the shaft I0 is provided with diametrically opposed pins l6 which are spaced between the pins I2 and are likewise journalecl in bearings carried between the plates I501 the universal joint. With this construction, the vertical shaft it may have a gyratcry movement with respect to the driving shaft 8. The sleeve ll extends above the normal water level in the stationary tub l. The upper end of the sleeve isprovided with a spherical seat for a self-lubricating sleeve bearing l1 which guides the vertical shaft 10. This spher- 1'0 ical seat comprises a flared portion l8 of the sleeve and a ring 48a fixed therein. This spherical seat permits alinement of the bearing H with the shaft it so that the' bearing pressure is uniform regardless of the inclination of the shaft is supported within the base 2 has fixed thereto a hollow post it which extends through central openings in the top wall of the base and the bottom wall of the stationary tub. The post is secured to the bottom wall of the tub and to the base by means of screws 2! which are threaded through a clamping ring 22 into a ,flange 23 which is integral with the post 26. Suitable gaskets are arranged between the flange 23 and the base and between the base and the bottom wall of the tub. Leakage from the bottom of the tub is prevented by means of a rubber sleeve 26 which has its lower edge clamped lie- 30 tween the ring 22 and the bottom of the tub and which has its upper edge clamped to the sleeve ii above the post 20 by means of a clam 25. Within the post 20 is a resilient mounting for the lower end of th sleeve II which comprises -two annuluses 26 of rubber or other resilient material. The lower annulus is arranged between an inwardly extending flange 21 at the lower end of the post and a flange 28 projecting froma sleeve 29 secured to the sleeve H. The upper annulusis arranged between the upper side of the flange 28 and a washer 30. The inner edge of the upper annulus 26 rests against a sleeve 3lwhich is fixed to the sleeve II. The sleeve 3| is of the same dimensions as the sleeve 29 and is used so that the annuluses 26 may beof the same size. The resilience of the mounting is adjusted by means of a nut 32 which is thread- I ed into the upper end of the post 20. This-nut varies the compression of the rubber and thereby varies the'stiffness of the mounting. With this mounting, the sleeve II is resiliently held in a central position and is free to tiltln all directions in order that the shaft In which is guided in the sleeve may have a gyratorymovement.

The housing at the driving mechanism which In the upper part of the stationary tub is a rotatable tub or receptacle 33 for receiving liquid and material to be washed. The space between the bottom of the receptacle 33 and the bottom of the stationary tub I is suflicient to provide a storage space for all the liquid which can be placed in the receptacle. At the center of the receptacle is a vertical sleeve 34 which serves as the hub for the receptacle. The upper end of the sleeve 34 projects above the water level in the receptacle. The lower end of the sleeve 34 fits into an opening in the bottom wall of the receptacle and an opening in a stiffening disk 35, both of which are held in position between a shoulder and a spunov'er portion, as shown at 36. The lower end of the sleeve 34 is provided with a circular flange 31 which extends over the upper side of the bottom wall of the receptacle. The flange 31 and the stiffening disk 35 are secured to the bottom wall of the receptacle by means of rivets 38. The lower end of the sleeve 34 is guided by a self-lubricating bearing '39 which is fixed to the vertical shaft Ill. The upper end of the sleeve 34 is'guided on the shaft 19 by a. self-lubricating sleeve bearing 40 which is pressed within the upper end of the sleeve against an inwardly extending flange 4! (see Fig. 2) formed thereon. The lower end of the sleeve bearing 46 bears on a hardened steel thrust collar 42 which is keyed to the shaft 10. The thrust collar is supported on the shaft by means of a shoulder 43 on the shaft. The weight of the receptacle and the material contained therein is transmitted to the thrust collar 42 by the bearing 40 and through the shoulder 43 to the shaft 10.

From the shaft 10 the weight is transmitted through the universal joint to the shaft 8.

The shaft l projects above the sleeve 34 and the projecting end is providedwith splines 44 I into which fit complementary teeth formed in'a bushing 45 which is fixed in the upper end of a sleeve 46. The sleeve depends around the hub 34 of the receptacle and has a bearing 41 in its lower end which bears on the hub. At the lower end of the sleeve 46 is a disk 48 having a hub 49 fixed to the sleeve 46. Eccentrically located in the upper surface of the disk is a circular depression having vertical walls 56 and bottom walls 5| inclined upwardand merging. into the hub 49.-

From the upper end of the vertical walls 50 the upper surface 52a of the disk flares downward and outward toward the bottom of the receptacle terminating in an inwardly rolled edge 52 adjacent the inner surface of a vertical flange 53 of a ring 54 secured to the bottom wall of the re-' ceptacle. Projecting from the sleeve 46 are upper and lower arms 55 and 56 in which are flxed bearings 51 and 58 in which a pin 59 is rotatably carried. The upperend of the pin 59 is fixed in a boss 60 on a plate 6| secured to the top wall of a cylindrical agitator 62. The lower edge of the boss 69 bears on a chamfered seat ,63 formed in a thrust bearing 64 fixed to the upper side of the arm 55. opening which facilitates the insertion of the pin 59 into the bearing 51. The side walls of the agitator are corrugated to form vertical ribs 65. The lower end of the agitator is cylindrical and projects within the circular depression formed in the top of the disk 48. The lower end of the agitator terminates in an inwardly rolled edge 66. Upon rotation of the shaft In the disk 48 and the arms 55 and 56 are rotated. This causes the agitator 62 to have an orbital movement in the The chamfered seat 63 serves as a guide receptacle, squeezing the clothes between the agitator and the side walls of the receptacle. Since the agitator is freely rotatable in the bearings 51 and 58 it is held relatively stationary by the resistance offered by the clothes. The agitator may have some slight rotating movement due to variations in the resistance offered by. the clothes. Since the disk is rotating relative to the agitator there is no tendency for clothes to move beneath the lower end of the agitator. Clothes which are accidentally moved into the space between the agitator and the vertical walls 50 on the disk move outward as the disk revolves. The downwardly flaring upper surface 52a of the disk also tends to move the clothes outward along the bottom wall of the receptacle. This outward movement tends to force the clothes upward along the side walls of the receptacle inducing a circulation of clothes diagrammatically shown by the arrows 61. The flange 53 cooperates with the edge 52 of the disk to prevent the movement of the clothes underneath the disk. The foregoing agitator construction is being claimed in Patent No. 2,255,505, issued September 9, 1941, on a divisional application Serial No. 291,599, filed August 23, 1939.

While the agitator is being operated for washing, there is some tendency for the receptacle 33 to be rotated in the same direction as the shaft H). In the construction illustrated, this direction of rotation is counterclockwise viewed from the top of Fig. 1. If this rotation of the receptacle were permitted there would be less relative movement of the agitator in the receptacle and the washing action would therefore be less. This counterclockwise rotation of the receptacle is prevented by an over-running clutch arranged.

- between the collar and the shaft so that the shaft and collar do not come in contact in any position of the shaft. In the side walls of the collar 69 are notches 10 (Fig. 5) in which are carried rolls 1|. Vertical movement of the rolls in the notches is prevented by a washer 10 at the top and by bottoms walls 10 of the notches. The sides of the notches 10 are inclined so that when the receptacle 33 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction as viewed from the top in-Fig. 1 (a clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 5) the rolls 1| are jammed between the inclined surfaces of the notches" and the inner walls of the flange 68, holding the receptacle against rotation. When the receptacle is rotated, in the reverse direction, the rolls occupy the position shown in Fig. 5, and offer no resistance to the rotation of the receptacle.

The side walls of the receptacle are provided with ribs 12 which tend to prevent rotational movement of the clothes around the receptacle during washing. The ribs also key the clothes and liquid to the side walls of the receptacle at the startof extracting. The clothes are prevented from falling over the upper edge of the receptacle by means of an annular guard ring 13 which is located slightly below the lower edge of the receptacle. During washing, water may be continuously discharged into the top of the receptacle. The excess water will flow through openings 14 in the 'guard ring and over the upper edge of the receptacle. The inner edge of the guard ring is provided with a cylindrical flange i terminating in a rolled edge 16 which serves as a casting, the lower end of which is closed by a plate is. Extending across the side walls of the the casting is a strut is in which is fixed a sleeve bearing 85 guiding the lower end of the shaft 8. In the upper side of the strut i9 is a seat 8! in which is arranged a ball thrust bearing 32. A shoulder 83 on the shaft 8 transmits the thrust from the shaft through the ball bearing 62 to the strut is. The ball bearing therefor carries the weight of the receptacle 33 and contents, the weight being transmitted through the universal joint between the shafts 8 and lb. The bearings Si? and 82 are located within the gear casing. and are therefore easily lubricated.

In the top wall of the gearcasing is a boss 8d in which is fixed a sleeve bearing 85. Journaled in the bearing 85 is a sleeve 86 the upper end of which projects outside the gear casing and has keyed thereto a pulley 87 which is driven through a v-belt 88 by a reversible electric motor 89. The

motor is suitably supported, in a manner not shown, from the base 2. Integral with the lower end of the sleeve 88 is a pinion ed'which meshes with a gear 9i rotatably carried on a shaft 92 fixed in a boss 93 integral with the top wall of the gear casing. The gear 5! is supported on the shaft 92 by a thrust washer Qt bearing against the lower endof the hub 95 of-the gear. The thrust washer is held in place by a snap ring as. On the hub 95 is cut a pinion a? which meshes with a gear 98 rotatably surrounding sleeves 99 and use fixed to the shaft 8. Projecting fromthe lower side of the gear 98 is a hub ml which bears on the bail thrust bearing 82.

Between the gear 98 and the shaft 8 is an overrunning clutch (Fig. 8) which comprises rolls m2 confined between the adjacent ends of sleeves $9 and idii and fitting in notches Hi3 formed in the shaft 8. When the gear 98 is rotated in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 8, the rolls are in the position shown and there is no connection between the gear and the shaft. This may be termed the "free position of the clutch, i. e. the position in which no driving connection 'is established. When the gear 98 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 8, the rolls are wedged between the irm'er surface of the hub mi and the inclined surfaces of the notches m3, establishing a driving connection between the gear and the shaft. In this condition, the clutch is in its engaged or driving posion.

Between the sleeve 86 and the shaft 8 is an overrunning clutch which comprises rolls I04 confined between sleeves H and ms fixed to the rotate the pulley 81 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed from the top of Fig. 6, the overrunning clutch between the sleeve 86 and the shaft 8 is in the -free-position, i. e. the position in which no driving connection is established between the sleeve and the shaft, while the overrunning clutch between the-gear 98 and the shaft 8 is in the engaged or driving position establishing a driving connection to the shaft. Under these circumstances the shaft 8 is rotated at a relatively slow speed ina counterclockwise direction through the reduction gearing which comprisesthe pinion 9d, the gear 9!, the pinion 91, and the gear 96. This causes the sleeve at to be rotated giving the agitator $2 an orbital. movement in the receptacle which effects the washing action. The over-running clutch between the flange 68 of the receptacle and the collar 69 fixed to the sleeve M (Fig. 5) holds the receptacle stationary, as explained above.

When the motor is rotated in the direction to cause rotation of the pulley 8? in a clockwise direction, as viewed from the top of Fig. 6, the

over-running clutch between the sleeve 86 and the shaft 8 is in the position to establish a driving connection to the shaft 8 and the shaft is accordingly rotated at the same speed as the pulley. Under this condition the over-running clutch between the'gear 9B and the shaft 8 is in the free position so that no driving connection is established'between the gear Q8 and :the shaft 3. Since no reduction gearing is interposed between the pulley and the shaft 8, the shaft is rotated at a relatively high speed and in a clockwise direction. During this rotation of the shaft, the clutch between the flange 68 and the collar 65 is in its free position.

7 During the high speed rotation of the shaft 8,

a driving connection between the shaft i d and the receptacle 33 is effected by means of a centrifugal clutch which is carried in the thrust collar 42. This clutch comprises two shoes see which are held against a squared cam surface we on the thrust collar by means of two split rings lid. During washing, when the shaft it is rotated at a relatively slow speed, of the order of a magnitude of revolutions per minute, the split rings- H0 are strong enough to hold the shoes. I08 against the squared portion E09. During extracting, the shaft 50 is rotated at a'speed of the order of 1200 R. P. M. As soon as the speed of rotation of the shaft in exceeds a few hundred R. P.'M. the clutch shoes I08 move outward under the action of centrifugal force and touch the inner surface of the sleeve 34 which forms the hub of the receptacle 33. As soon as shaft 8 and arranged in notches Nil in the shaft.

When the sleeve 86 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction, as' viewed in Fig. 7, the rolls a are in the position shown, this being the "free" position in which no driving connection is established between the sleeve and the shaft. When the sleeve 86 is rotated in a clockwise direction the rolls 164 are wedged between the inner sur-- the shoes I08 contact the inner surface of the sleeve 34, rotation of the shoes is retarded and the squared surface MS of the clutch 42 c00per ates with the inner surface of the shoes in! and wedges the shoes tightly against the-inner surface of the sleeve 34 to the position shown in Fig. 4. The pressure between the sleeve and the shoes is proportional to the torque exerted on shaft Ill. I'l'iis effects a positive driving connection between the shaft and the receptacle which causes the receptacle to be rotated. Similarly, when the speed of the shaft is retarded by the brake in stopping, the shoes release and immediately wedge in the opposite direction. During the high'speed (clockwise) rotation'of the shaft I0, the over-running clutch between the receptacle and the, sleeve N (Fig. 5) is in the free position, permitting the rotation of the receptacle.

In the use of the washing machine, the receptacle is filled with liquid and clothes and the motor is rotated in the direction to cause rotation of the pulley 81 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed from the top of Fig. 6. 'This causes the shaft 8 to be rotated at a relatively slow speed through the reduction gearing which comprises the pinion 90, the gear 9|, the pinion 91, and-the gear 98, causing the agitator 62 to be given anorbital movement in the receptacle squeezing the clothes between the sides of the receptacle. During washing, the over-running clutch between the flange 68 and the collar 69 holds the receptacle stationary. At the conclusion of the washing operation the direction of the rotation of the motor is reversed causing the shaft 8 to be rotated at a relatively high speed through the clutch between the sleeve 88 and the shaft 8. During the high speed rotation the liquid is centrifugally extracted from the clothes in the receptacle. The over-running clutch between the flange 68 and the collar 89 is in its free position duringthe high speed rotation of the receptacle, and accordingly, offers no resistance. With this construction, the shift from washing to extracting is obtained by reversing the direction of rotation of the motor. Since the motor must come to a standstill before reversing its rotation, it is not possible to simultaneously operate both the washing and extracting mechanism and there is no need for interlocks or other safety devices to prevent the simultaneous operation of the washing and extracting mechanism.

What I claim as new and desire tosecure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

means including an over-running clutch for preventing rotation of the receptacle during rotation of the agitator, said clutch being arranged between the receptacle and a stationary part of the machine, and a connection between the receptacle and the shaft means effective upon high speed rotation of the shaft means in the reverse direction for effecting rotation of the receptacle to extract liquid from the material contained therein.

3. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle for receiving material to be washed, a rotatable agitator in the receptacle, shaft means, a connection between the agitator and the shaft means whereby the agitator is rotated in the receptacle for washing upon rotation of the shaft means in one direction, and a connection between the receptacle and the shaft means effective upon high speed rotation of the shaft means in the reverse direction for rotating the receptacle to extract liquid from the material contained therein. 1

' the receptacle to extract liquid from the material 1. In a washing machine, a receptacle for receiving material to be washed, a rotatable agitator in the receptacle, means for supporting the receptacle in rotatable relation to the agitator, shaft means, a connection between the agitator and the shaft means whereby the agitator is rotated with the shaft means, means effective pon rotation of the shaft means in one direction for resisting rotation of the receptacle whereby the agitator is rotated relative to the receptacle, and a connection between the receptacle and the shaft means effective upon high speed rotation of the shaft means in the reverse direction for effecting rotation of the receptacle toextract liquid from the material contained therein.

2. In a washing machine, a receptacle for receiving material to be washed, a rotatable agishaft means, a connection between the agitator and the shaft means whereby the agitator is rotated with the shaft means. for washing'upon contained therein.

5. In a washing machine, a vertical sleeve, a shaft extending through the sleeve, a receptacle having a hub surrounding the sleeve, an agitator in the receptacle connected tothe shaft, means tator in the receptacle, means supporting the rerotation of the shaft means in one direction,

for selectively rotating'the shaft in reverse directions, means including an over-running clutch arranged between the receptacle hub and said sleeve for holding the receptacle stationary effective upon rotation of the shaft in one direction whereby the agitator is rotated relative to the receptacle for washing, and means effective upon high speed rotation of the shaft in the reverse direction for rotating the receptacle to extract liquid from the material contained therein.

6. In a-washing machine, a receptacle, an agitator therein, means for rotating the agitator in the receptacle in one direction, means including an over-running clutch for holding the receptacle against rotation during therotation of the agitator, and means for rotating the receptacle in the reverse direction for extracting liquid from the material therein.

GEORGE W. DUNHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441926 *Jul 13, 1946May 18, 1948Otto E ZahnCombination washing and drying machine
US2461629 *Mar 2, 1944Feb 15, 1949Gen Motors CorpClutch and brake mechanism
US2494436 *Aug 6, 1943Jan 10, 1950Thor CorpCombined clothes washer and extractor
US2498420 *Jul 17, 1944Feb 21, 1950Hemmeter George TCombination clothes washer and extractor
US2538246 *Oct 21, 1944Jan 16, 1951Osmund Holm-HansenWashing machine
US2568614 *Oct 4, 1945Sep 18, 1951Admiral CorpClothes-washing machine with a horizontally reciprocating agitator
US2630001 *Aug 20, 1948Mar 3, 1953Bush AgWashing machine
US2648212 *Dec 10, 1949Aug 11, 1953Gen ElectricCombined washing machine and spin tub with one-way fluid drive
US2660870 *Aug 20, 1948Dec 1, 1953Kennedy Edward FClothes-washing and extracting apparatus
US2695510 *Jul 8, 1948Nov 30, 1954Kendall ClarkWashing machine
US2730886 *Dec 6, 1951Jan 17, 1956Speed Flex IncClothes washing machines
US2826055 *Jul 8, 1952Mar 11, 1958Borg WarnerWashing machine drive mechanism
US2826056 *Aug 28, 1953Mar 11, 1958Easy Washing Machine Company LDrive for automatic washer
US2832207 *Apr 27, 1955Apr 29, 1958Hoover CoWashing machines
US2859877 *Aug 30, 1954Nov 11, 1958Gen Motors CorpSuspension system for spinner type washing machine
US2879655 *Mar 10, 1954Mar 31, 1959Gen Motors CorpWashing and extracting machine
US2901294 *May 7, 1956Aug 25, 1959Maytag CoTub seal and bearing structure
US4291556 *May 4, 1979Sep 29, 1981Whirlpool CorporationAutomatic washer transmission shift mechanism
US5491859 *Nov 30, 1993Feb 20, 1996Maytag CorporationConversion from rotary to oscillating transmission
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/23.6
International ClassificationD06F13/00, D06F13/02, D06F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationD06F13/02, D06F13/08
European ClassificationD06F13/08, D06F13/02