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Publication numberUS2269622 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1942
Filing dateAug 2, 1939
Priority dateAug 2, 1939
Publication numberUS 2269622 A, US 2269622A, US-A-2269622, US2269622 A, US2269622A
InventorsDowning Adrian P
Original AssigneeDowning Adrian P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping container
US 2269622 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan.`13, 1942. A. P. DowNlNG SHIPPING CONTAINER Filed Aug. 2, 195.9 6 u @j 2 9 Imm-mll /0 Patented Jan. 13, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHIPPING CONTAINER Adrian P. Downing, Winter Haven, Fla.

Application August 2, 1939, Serial No. '287,859

5 Claims.

This invention relates to shipping containers and particularly to such devices of light-weight or thin wood construction used for shipment of citrus fruit, apples, lettuce, celery and other non-self-supporting bulk commodities, the most prevalent form being containers of the type known as the Bruce box.

The main objects of this invention are to provide an improved box construction arranged for more rapid and eci-ent closure after being packed; to provide a thin wood box having an improved cover or closure construction; to provide an improved closure arrangement for vboxes having ythin end walls that .normally bulge outwardly when the box is packed full; to provide a closure arrangement that will obviate splitting or breaking of the box end walls and end wall liner strips during the closing operation on a full packed box; and to provide a top closure arrangement for fruit, and vegetabl-e and other bulk commodity shipping containers that will increase the speed and eiciency and lessen the cost of the closing operation.

A specific embodiment of this invention is shown in the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a Wire bound Bruce box embodying the improved closure arrangement.

,Fig 2 is an end view of the same showing, in dotted outline, the manner in which hingedly connected side walls are folded to form the box and receive the end panels to be made ready for packing.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan View tof a box and showing, in dotted outline, the normally bulging condition of the end wall when the box is packed full.

Fig. 4 is .a fragmentary sectional View of a top end corner illustrating the action of the top or closure panel cleats during the closing operation.

Fig, 5 is a similar view showing the top corner .of the improved box arrangement in closed position.

Fig. -6 is a similar view showing a moded form .of top or closure cleat.

Fig. 7 is a similar View showing another form of top cleat, and

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of still another form of cleat.

The invention herein disclosed resides in providing a cleat arrangement for the top or closure panel Vof a box whereby, when the topv or closure is hinged to a side panel along one edge, it may be readily swung downwardly to closed position against the outwardly bulging end walls Without the necessity of first pounding inthe end Walls in order to permit the top cleats to pass their top edges; the cleats of the top or closure panel being shaped on their inner sides to cam the bulging end walls into proper position as the top panel is being swung to closed position.

As shown, Ythe box in which the invention is embodied is of the type known as a wire-bound Bruce' box lcomprising a front side panel I, a bottom panel 2, a back side panel 3 and a top or closure panel 4, all connected in a foldable series by means of binding wires 5 which extend from end to end of the panel series. These binding wires have each end terminating in a loop 6 by .means of which the boX is fastened in closed position, and each binding wire is secured to the wall panels by spaced staples in the well-known manner.

Also as shown each of the wall panels is provided with opposite end cleats l, which cleats extend in-substantially end to end relation along the side edges of the panel series, on the inner surface thereof, and provide end reinforcements for the folded box. The cleats 'I are stapled onto the wall panels and have their ends mitered or otherwise formed so that when the box is folded, as shown in Figs, 1 and 2, and closed, the cleat ends will abut each other and the cleats will form a continuous vframe around the inside of each end of the box.

The ends of the box are closed olf by means of separate rectangular end panels 8 which t into the box and set against the inner faces of the cleats l. These .end panels may either be a single sheet of solid wood or other suitable material, or a plurality of slats and, especially in the latter case, are often provided with liners or liner strips 9 along the top and bottom edges, usually on the outer end panel face surface.

As shown in the drawing each cleat 1 on the top or closure panel 4 is shaped on its inner side so as to form a camming surface I0 and obviate any sharp or right angled corner that might otherwise catch on the top edge of the end panels during closure of the box. The camming surface I0 is formed on the inner side of the cleats at the lower corner thereof and extends along the cleat a Idistance sufficient to engage any `portion of the end panel which may be bulged .outwardly when the box is packed, as indicated in Fig. 3.

Thus, when the box is packed full, in the usual bulk packing manner, and the sides and ends are bulged outwardly as is always the case, the top or closure panel may be swung down to closed position with an ordinary swinging movement, the cam surface ID engaging the top edge of the end panel or liner strip, at a point near the cleat of the back side panel where the end panel is just beginning to bulge outwardly, and gently forcing the end panel inwardly by a smooth camming action until the top or closure is in completely closed position with its cleats 'I overlapping the end panel along the entire top edge of the same. The top panel is then fastened by means of the wire loops 6, or other suitable means, in the usual manner and the container is ready for shipment.

Heretofore folding shipping containers for fruit and vegetables, which are made from thin wood veneer usually about 1/8" thick and which have thin end walls, have always been made with reinforcing cleats of rectangular cross-section having a square corner on the lower inside edge; and since such shipping containers always bulge outwardly at the sides and ends when packed there has always been a serious difficulty in effecting a rapid and eiiicient closure of the box top due to the fact that the square lower inside corners of the cleats on the top panel would invariably catch on the top edge of the end panels or of the end panel liner strips, with the result that it was necessary to manually force the outer faces of the end panels inwardly, by beating and pushing on them, in order to permit the cleats of the top panel to pass the upper end panel edges; and even then the top panel cleats would often split the end panels or tear off the liner strips during the closing operation.

In such cases it was then necessary to open the box and replace the end panels with new ones or to make repairs on the original end panels, resulting in much waste of time and material and a considerable increase in the packing costs. Also, beating-in the end panels to knock them inwardly sufficient for the top panel cleats to pass their upper edges results in damage to the box contents.

With my improved arrangement of cleats on the top or closure panel it is no longer necessary to manually force the end panels inwardly prior to and during the closing operation, since the camming surfaces on the top panel cleats will engage the outwardly-bulging top edges of the end panels and gently push them into proper position so that the top or closure panel can be entirely closed. This not only obviates any danger of splitting the end panels or breaking the liner strips thereof, but also results in perfect closing operations and a considerable saving of time and labor.

As shown in the drawing, the camming surface I0 of the top or closure panel cleats may have any one of several shapes. In the form shown in Figs. 1, 4 and 5 camming surface is formed by merely beveling off the lower inside corner of the cleat along the entire length of the cleat, the bevel extending from a point on the lower face of the cleat, spaced somewhat inwardly from the outer edge of the same, to a point on the inner face of the cleat spaced from the top face of the same. In the form shown in Fig. 6, the bevel extends from the outer face of the cleat to a point on the inner face of the same spaced below the top cleat face; and in the form shown in Fig. '7, the inner lower corner of the cleat is rounded instead of beveled to provide the camming surface.

In the form shown in Fig. 8, the camining surface I0 instead of extending from end to end of the cleat is terminated just inside of each end of the cleat for the reason that the side edges of the end panels 8 are always held in position in alignment with the inner face surface of the top panel cleats by the cleats on the side panels l and 3.

While the conventional wire-bound Bruce box is illustrated in the drawing to show an embodiment of my invention, it will be understood that the invention may be applied to other forms of shipping containers for fruits, vegetables and other bulk commodities such as shipping containers having detachable tops and constructions wherein the top or closure panel is hinged or otherwise secured onto one of the side panels after the box is packed and then swung to closed position. Also, it will be understood that duplex boxes either arranged for top or bottom opening boxes having staple hinge connections, nailed box constructions, and corrugated or fibre constructions with wood cleat end reinforcement are to be included within the scope of my invention.

The main advantages of my invention reside in the more rapid and efficient closing of the packed boxes and in the decreased packing cost due to the time saved in the closing operation and due to the obviating of breakage of the end panels or the end panel liner strips. Another advantage resides in the fact that the camming surface of my invention does not in any way weaken or impair the strength of the box and does tend to decrease the weight of the same which is always an important factor.

Although several embodiments of my invention are herein shown and described, it will be understood that details of the arrangements shown may be altered or omitted without departing from the spirit of this invention as defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. A shipping container comprising a connected series of wall panels each having opposite end cleats on their inner face surfaces, said panels being foldable to box form and said end cleats coacting to provide a continuous internal reinforcing frame at each end of the container, end panels arranged to set against the inner side of said cleats, and one of said Wall panels being arranged as a closure for the container, said closure panel cleats each having a cam surface on its lower inside edge and meeting the inner surface of the cleat to engage the upper outside edge of the respective end panel and cam it inwardly upon closing of said container, and the inner surface of each of said closure panel cleats forming a substantial abutment for the end panel which is cammed in.

2. In a shipping container having an open side and thin end walls normally bulging outwardly when said container is packed, a closure panel for said open side having end cleats on its inner face, said cleats each having a cam surface on its lower inside edge to cammingly engage the free edge of a respective outwardly bulging end wall and slidably force the same inwardly as said closure panel is positioned to close the open side of said container, said cam surface meeting the inside surface of Ythe cleat so as to provide a substantial abutment for the end panel which is cammed in.

3. In a shipping container having an open side and thin end walls each abutting the inner side of a respective series of end cleats secured on the inner surfaces of the container side walls, said end walls normally bulging outwardly beyond said end cleats when said container is packed full, a closure panel for said open side, and end cleats on said closure panel arranged for alignment with the respective rst mentioned cleats and each having a cam surface on its inside lower edge to slidably engage the bulging edge of a respective end wall and cam the same inwardly as said closure panel is pushed to closing position on said container, said cam surface meeting the inside surface of the cleat so as to provide a substantial abutment for the end panel which is cammed in.

4. In a shipping container having an open side and thin end walls each abutting the inner side of a respective series of end cleats secured on the inner surfaces of the container side walls, said end walls normally bulging outwardly beyond said end cleats when said container is packed full, a closure panel for said open side hingedly connected to one of the container side walls, and end cleats on said closure panel each having a cam surface on its inside lower edge to slidably engage the bulging edge of a respective end wall and cam the same inwardly into alignment with the inside surface of the respective series of end cleats as said closure panel is pushed to closing position on said container, said cam surface meeting the inside surface of the cleat so as to provide a substantial abutment for the end panel which is cammed in.

5. In a shipping container having an open side and thin end walls normally bulging outwardly when said container is packed full, a closure panel for said open side, and end cleats on the inner face of the closure panel each having its lower inside corner portions beveled to provide a cam surface to engage the free edge of a respective outwardly bulging end wall and cammingly force the same inwardly as said closure panel is positioned to close the open side of said container, said cam'surface meeting the inside surface of the cleat so as to provide a substantial abutment for the end panel which is cammed.

6. In a shipping container having an open side and thin end walls normally bulging outwardly when said container is packed full, a closure panel for said open side, and end cleats on the inner face of the closure panel each having its lower inside corner portions rounded to provide a cam surface to engage the free edge of a respective outwardly bulging end wall and cammingly force the same inwardly as said closure panel is positioned to close the open side of said container, said surface meeting the inside surface of the cleat so as to provide a substantial abutment for the end panel which is cammed in.

ADRIAN P. DOWNING.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5823374 *Apr 29, 1997Oct 20, 1998Wu; Jack Chieh-YuanCollapsible box formed with bamboo strips
US7011214 *Dec 27, 2002Mar 14, 2006Dm & BbPrivate pallet-box cargo shipping system
US7482928Mar 13, 2006Jan 27, 2009Private Pallet Security Systems, LlcMini pallet-box moving container
US7714708May 13, 2005May 11, 2010Brackmann Rogers FSmart pallet-box cargo container
US20030123965 *Dec 27, 2002Jul 3, 2003Brackmann Rogers F.Private pallet-box cargo shipping system
US20050232747 *May 13, 2005Oct 20, 2005Brackmann Rogers FSmart pallet-box cargo container
US20080297346 *Mar 13, 2006Dec 4, 2008Private Pallet Security Systems, LlcMini pallet-box moving container
Classifications
U.S. Classification217/47
International ClassificationB65D6/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D9/20
European ClassificationB65D9/20