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Publication numberUS2269871 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1942
Filing dateOct 30, 1940
Priority dateOct 30, 1940
Publication numberUS 2269871 A, US 2269871A, US-A-2269871, US2269871 A, US2269871A
InventorsDe Botelho Martin
Original AssigneeDe Botelho Martin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soap article
US 2269871 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

252.coMPosnibm. Cross Referencfe Examiner Jan. 13, 1942.. l M DE BOTLHQ 2,269,871

SOAP ARTICLE Filed 0G13. 30, 1940 Patented Jan. 13, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Claims.

'Ihe present invention is directed to an article of manufacture embodying soap of such character as to have certain new and useful properties.

It is among the objects of the present invention to provide a combination of a body of soap with a protective coating thereon such as a bath mitt whereby the combined article of manufacture will oat in Water.

It is also among the objects of the present invention to provide a body of soap having an extremely large number of minute pores disseminated throughout the same, the character and number of such pores being sufficient so that the specific gravity of the body is considerably less than that of water.

It is further among the objects of the invention to provide a method whereby a body of soap of the desired character may be obtained.

In practicing the invention, I provide a body of soap of any suitable size or shape. The soap is provided during the course of manufacture thereof with a large number of pores which are so fine that they are practically invisible except under considerable magnification. These pores are not usually independent of each other, but at least a large number thereof are intercommunicating. However, in spite of such intercommunication, the pores do not become filled with water when the'cake of soap is placed in water, since the gases trapped therein prevent Water from displacing the same. As a result, a very low specic gravity is obtained and the body of soap not only floats in water, but a substantial part thereof is a considerable distance above the surface of the water, so that the tendency of soap in water to soften is considerably lessened, and the loss of soap by solution in the water is minimized. Furthermore, because of the relatively small amount of soap in the cake, the user is not so apt to use an excess of soap, and thus the present invention is more economical in use.

The soap so formed in suitable size and shape is then placed within a fabric or other cover which acts as a bath mitt. A single piece or cake of soap may be so placed and the mitt may be temporarily or permanently sealed so as to retain the same therein. Although the material of the mitt is considerably heavier than water, because of the extremely low specific gravity of the soap itself, the combined article readily floats in water. Even when a relatively small amount of soap is contained within the mitt, the combined article still is able to float.

One method of producing the article of the present invention is as follows: Fats and oils, such as a mixture of cocoanut and olive oils and tallow, or fatty acids derived therefrom, are placed in a steam jacketed soap kettle and to the same is added caustic'alkali such as sodium hydroxide in sufficient amount to react with the oils or fatty acids to form a substantially neutral soap. The kettle is heated, with stirring, Whereby the soap-forming reaction takes place. After this is completed, and while the temperature is relatively high, say about C., there is added to the liquid mass 10% of a solution in Water of hydrogen peroxide. The strength of the solution may vary, but it has been found that this amount of a solution containing 33 volumes of hydrogen peroxide, gives a good result. The solution is mixed with the molten soap composition and is run into soap frames and there allowed to cool. During the cooling operation, which requires a considerable length of time, the hydrogen peroxide slowly decomposes, giving off minute bubbles of oxygen which, because the soap is viscous and semi-solid, are trapped substantially at the points where the bubbles are formed. Be-

- cause of this, there is provided an extremely large number of small pores filled with oxygen and to a large extent intercommunicating.

It is usual to add to soaps various substances such as perfume oils, antiseptics, and the like. In soap as previously made it was necessary that these additions be made in the kettle prior to the casting thereof into solid bodies. Such incorporation requires vigorous agitation of the body of soap, and in the present case such procedure cannot be successfully used as itseifect will be to destroy the minute bubbles of oxygen. In accordance with the present invention, in order to introduce perfumes and the like into the soap, the soap is rst cast in the frames and cooled as stated above. The slabs of soap are then removed from the frames and subjected to a separate procedure. This may be accomplished by atomizing the perfume oil or the like with air and the atomized liquid thenforced into the pores of the soap. Since many of the pores are intercommunicating, the atomized oil will penetrate into the center of the soap body and will be deposited upon the surfaces of the pores. Because of the small size of said pores, the oils, although volatile, will remainftherein with but very little loss over long periods of time. In this manner, various ingredients may be introduced successfully and rapidly into the soap.

'I'he bars may be then cut into `cakes of regular size and either used as such or placed within a 252.V COMPOSITIQNM suitable bath mitt, as set forth above. The bath mitt acts as a protective means whereby when the soap is placed in water, it will prevent to a substantial extent the softening action of the water on the soap and will avoid unnecessary solution and loss of the soap. Usually, there is provided a layer of flexible, semi-pervious material within the mitt under the upper surface thereof. This has a beneficial effect in several respects, in that, because of its resilience and senil-stiffness, it will tend to hold the mitt in its proper shape at al1 times. Alsothe said layer has the effect of trapping gases which may escape from the soap as it is dissolved and thereby produce added buoyancy in the article.

In the accompanying drawing, constituting a part hereof, and in which like reference characters indicate like parts.

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a combined bath mitt and floating soap article, some parts being broken away for clearness; and

Fig. 2 is a vertical, cross-sectional view of the bath mitt taken along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

The article consists essentially of upper and lower members I and 2 of woven fabric, and preferably of bath towel-like material. 'I'he edges thereof are turned inwardly and stitched at 3 in order to complete the mitt. A handle 4 consisting of a flat strip of fabric overlays the upper member I and is held in place by the stitches 3.

Within the mitt, and in contact with the under surface of member I, is a layer 5 usually of sponge rubber. This has a number of' relatively large pores which are in the main not interconnected and having some measure of buoyancy. Below the layer 5, and filling substantially the entire space, is a body of soap 6, which is preferably in the form of granules, the diameter of which is usually not over one-fourth of an inch. These granules are of porous materials containing mi- "l nute pores which are lled with gas, as set forth above.

By reason of this structure, the complete assembly or article is so light that it readily floats on water. porous character of the soap granules 6, which usually have a specific gravity of 0.9, or even less. Therefore, the entire assembly, including fabric and rubber layer 5, is caused to float. Because the handle l is adjacent to layer 5, the user always has -member I on top, and therefore when the mitt is floating in water or is being used, the dissolving of the soap liberates oxygen or other gas therefrom which travels upwardly and is trapped within the pores or under the surface of the layer 5, thus still further adding to the buoyancy of the product.

Applicant is aware that in the prior art soap had been treated in order to cause it to float in water. However, the prior results were obtained by beating air into soap while it was still in the molten condition. Because of the manner in which this was accomplished, the soap barely floated and when an attempt was made to introduce it into a bath mitt, the combination sank very quickly, as it was impossible to obtain a sufficient amount of air in order to overcome the weight of the fabric of the mitt. According to the present invention, by the production of minute particles of gas, an entirely different resuit is obtained in a completely different manner.

Although I have described my invention setting forth a single embodiment thereof, suitable variations in the method of :procedure and in various steps and ingredients may be made with,-l

lCr

This is due principally to the highly oss Reference ing the scope of the present invention. For instance, the oils or fatty acids used may be whatever is common in the manufacture of soap, and the proportions thereof may be changed at will. It is also feasible to introduce linto the soap various other ingredients. such as color, filler materials, abrasives, and the like, such as are now quite usual in the art. Usually, abrasives have a high specic gravity and soap made therewith feels heavy to the touch. By the present invention, the introduction of the minute pores renders such soaps at least as light as ordinary soaps. Other ways of obtaining the floating qualities are possible. In place of the sponge rubber layer, other materials which give similar results may be used.

I'he introduction of perfume and the like into the soap may take place at any stage after the solidication thereof. The perfume may be added to the slabs of soap, to bars cut therefrom, or even to the finished product. While in the drawing I have shown a single form which the soap may take, this is merely illustrative of the many other forms which are equally suitable, such as balls, rods, cubes, plates, and various combinations of irregular and regular shapes. The proportion of the hydrogen peroxide may be varied within considerable limits, and the greater the amount thereof the less is the specific gravity. While a specific gravity somewhat less than water is suitable, it is preferred that a specific gravity of about .9 be provided, although a greater or lesser specific gravity may be provided.

It is not necessary that the vlayer 5 be of sponge rubber, nor need it be of rubber at all. The principal characteristic desired in this layer is that it be semi-pliable and tend to hold the bath mitt in its proper shape without distortion. It has been found that some artificial plastic products, such as rubber substitutes and resinous plastics, are also suitable for the purpose. Furthermore, it is not essential that this layer have pores, although it is highly desirable. In addition, one may introduce into the body of soap granules, shreds I of moisture-proof material, such as Cellophane or the like, which have an inherent resilience and which are semi-stiff. By mixing such shreds with the soap granules, it prevents the sticking of the soap particles together and tends to hold the article in its proper form. Various other details of construction may be changed, as for instance the lateral edges of I and 2 need not be in-turned, but the stitching 3 may be made on an outwardly turned seam. Also, there may be incorporated in the same at one of the ends of the mitt, a loop or the like whereby the article may be hung up to dry without distorting the shape thereof.

These and other variations in the details of the invention may be made within the spirit thereof, and the scope of the invention is not to be limited except by the character of the claims appended hereto.

What I claim ist 1. A bath mitt comprising a closed container of bath towel fabric, a relatively narrow fabric handle across one face of said container, a relatively flat member of semi-stiff porous material within said container and adjacent to said handle, granular soap filling the space between said member and the other face of said container, said soap having fine microscopic gas-filled pores therein providing a specic gravity substantially less than that of water, the specific gravity of the combined soap and mitt belngless thanthat Examiner of water to cause the same to iioat thereon with said fiat member uppermost and in a position to trap gas released from said soap, said fiat member acting to cause said mitt to float with the handle above the water.

2. A bath mitt comprising a closed container of bath towel fabric of relatively flat oval shape having an upper and lower face, a relatively narrow fabric handle across one face of said container over the lesser diameter thereof, the ends of said handle being secured to the sides of said container, a relatively fiat member of semi-stiff porous material within said container and adjacent to said handle, granular soap filling the space between said member and the other face of said container, said soap having ne microscopic gas-filled pores therein providing a specific gravity substantially less than that of water, the specific gravity of the combined soap and mitt being less than that of water to cause the same to float thereon with said at member uppermost and in a position to trap gas released from said soap.

3. A bath mitt comprising a closed container of bath ltowel fabric, a relatively narrow fabric handle across one face of said container, a relatively at member of semi-stii porous material within said container and adjacent to said handle, granular soap lling the space between said member and the other face of said container, said soap having line microscopic gas-filled pores therein providing a specic gravity substantially less than that of water, the specific gravity of the combined soap and mitt being less than that of water to cause the same to float thereon with said fiat member uppermost and in a position to trap gas released from said soap, a plurality of relatively long shreds of moisture-proof semistiff material having an inherent resilience interspersed among the granules of soap to prevent the sticking together of the soap granules and to maintain said mitt in its initial form.

4. A bath mitt comprising a closed container of bath towel fabric, a relatively narrow fabric handle across one face of said container, a relatively flat member of semi-stiff porous material within said container and adjacent to said handle, granular soap lling the space between said member and the other face of said container, said soap having ne microscopic gas-lled pores therein providing a specific gravity substantially less than that of water, the specific gravity of the combined soap and mitt being less than that of water to cause the same to float thereon with said iiat member uppermost and in a position to trap gas released from said soap, said flat member having a convexity therein and acting to cause said mitt to float with the handle above the Water.

5. A bath mitt comprising a closed container of bath towel fabric, a relatively at member of semi-stiff porous material within said container, granular soap filling the space between said member and the other face of said container, said soap having fine microscopic gas-filled pores therein providing a specific gravity substantially less than that of water, the specific gravity of the combined soap and mitt'being less than that of water to cause the same to float thereon with said at member uppermost and in a position to hold gas released from said soap.

MARTIN DE BOTELHO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2932044 *Nov 3, 1958Apr 12, 1960Louis J WoodrowDiscardable dentifrice applicator
US4062792 *May 27, 1976Dec 13, 1977Mcnabb Charles LSoap cake construction and manufacture
US4240624 *Aug 29, 1978Dec 23, 1980Wilson Bradford WHand grip exercise device
US5361445 *Feb 26, 1993Nov 8, 1994Sponge Fishing Co., Inc.Scrubber washer apparatus
US5915434 *Jun 26, 1997Jun 29, 1999Juarez; Mark ReinleHand-held body washing and scrubbing device
US7256168 *May 8, 2001Aug 14, 2007Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AktienWashing or cleaning agent shaped bodies
US8578548Jul 26, 2012Nov 12, 2013John Robert CostelloAbrasive cleaning glove
US20110052305 *Aug 24, 2010Mar 3, 2011Julie LerosHand held gel pack
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/8, 15/244.4, 510/152, 510/438, 15/209.1, 510/145, 554/182, 401/201, 554/202, 510/455, 510/142
International ClassificationC11D17/02
Cooperative ClassificationC11D17/02
European ClassificationC11D17/02