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Publication numberUS2270382 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1942
Filing dateMay 20, 1940
Priority dateMay 20, 1940
Publication numberUS 2270382 A, US 2270382A, US-A-2270382, US2270382 A, US2270382A
InventorsNerney George E
Original AssigneeBay State Optical Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eyeglass construction
US 2270382 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 20, 1942. a. E. NERNEY 2,270,382

EYEGLASS CONSTRUCTION Filed May 20, 1940 INVENTOR georye E. Nerney BY I MMW Patented Jam 20, 1942 2,270,382 EYEGLAISJIS CONSTRUCTION George E. Nrney, Attleboro, Mass, assignor to Bay State Optical Company, Attleboro, Mass, I

a corporation of Maine Application May 20, 1940, Serial No. 336,152

5 Claims.

This invention relates to eyeglass construction .and more particularly to the eyewire structure for supporting the lenses.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide an eyeglass construction which is simple, practical, and thoroughly durable. Another object is to provide a construction of the above character which will be light, graceful, and pleasing in appearance. Another object is to provide a construction of the above character whose manufacture will be economical, both from the stand-.- point of labor and materials used. Still another object is to provide a construction of the above character which will be especially strong in vulnerable spots of the above type of construction. A further object is to provide a construction of the above character in which the material is so disposed as to attain a high degree of strength without heavy construction. Another object is to provide a construction of the above character in which the lenses will be securely mounteq by the eyewire. Another object is to provide a construction of the above character in which the visible portion of an eyewire is greatly reduced in size without sacrificing needed strength. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention, accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, as will be exemplified in the structure to be hereinafter described,

and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the draw- I is conducive to a clearer understanding of certain features of this invention, it might here be pointed out that appearance is one of the major factors in eyeglass construction and the present trend is to minimize the size of all non-transparent parts. :This is difiicult to accomplish in eyewire construction without sacrificing necessary strength. Furthermore, when aneyewire 1s materially reduced in size, difiiculty arises in securing the lens and eyewire by a mounting which will absorb the normal strain and shocks resulting from use, A further object of this invention is to overcome these difiiculties, as well as many others.

Referring now to Figure 1, a lens I0 is mounted within an eyewire, generally indicated at I2. Eyewire I2 has attached thereto an endpiece I4, a bridge I6, and a nose pad I8, each secured thereto in a suitable position and by suitable means. Eyewire I2 is preferably split at II to permit the mounting of lens Ill therein, and the two ends of the eyewire are secured together by a screw I5.

As is best shown in Figure 2, the edge of lens II) has a central peripheral groove 29 therealong with surfaces 20 and 22 at the sides thereof. Groove 29 is preferably substantially semicircular in cross section and also is preferably of a radius equal to approximately one quarter of the extends across substantially one half of the width of the lens edge.

Eyewire I2 includes a thin body portion 24 having a substantially semi-cylindrical ridge 26 formed thereon. The Width of body portion 24 is preferably greater than the thickness of lens Ill so that the eyewire edges 28 and 21 extend forwardly and rearwardly beyond the planes of the side faces of the lens. Ridge 26 is of substantial size, its cross-sectional area being greater than the cross-sectional area of the thin body portion 24, and at the sides of ridge 2B are two surfaces 2I and 23. Preferably, the cross-sectionalarea of ridge 26 is slightly smaller in all dimensions than is groove 29. Thus, when assembled, the inner surface 2I and 23 of eyewire I2 are juxtaposed to the surfaces 20 and 22 of the lens edge and ridge 26 extends into groove 29 but does not contact the bottom or sides thereof.

As best seen inFigures 1 and 3 ridge 26 is serrated, having a series of transverse openings, illustratively indicated at 26a, 26b, and 260, which extend a substantial distance therein. These openings are preferably equally spaced around the entire eyewire and permit the eyewire to be easily bent o that its body portion is easily drawn into close contact with the lens edge.

When it is desired to mount a lens in the eyewire, the edge of the lens and groove 29 are coated with a suitable cement which is preferably of a type which has resilient characteristics when set. Next, eyewire I2 is split, lens I0 is placed therein, and the two section are secured together by screw l5. The tightening of screw draws the eyewire into close contact with the edge of the lens, and during this process cement flows into the openings in the ridge and fills the spaces between the eyewire and the lens edge. When the .cement sets, it firmly grips ridge 26 because of the openings formed therein with the result that lens I0 i securely mounted. Furthermore, this cement assures a perfect fit between the ridge and the groove so that any shock is transmitted evenly to all parts of the lens edge and ridge 26 is prevented from exerting a wedging acting in groove 29. Also the use of a resilient cement in this type of construction is an aid in minimizing the effect of shocks on the eyewire.

Thus an eyewire construction is disclosed which is neat and attractive in appearance in that the visible portions of the eyewire are very small. Furthermore, strength has not been sacrificed in achieving this result as the increased width of the eyewire adapts it to resist longitudinal strains which tend to bend it transversely and ridge 25 forms a backbone to resist all types of strains.

Accordingly, eyewire I2 is a practical and efiicient construction which is designed to securely and attractively mount a lens while at the same time it protects the lens edge and the lens from shocks and strains resulting from use. It will now be apparent that I have provided an eyeglass structure in which the several objects hereinabove referred to, as well as many others, have been successfully and practically accomplished.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the above invention, and as many changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter hereinabove set forth or shown in the accompanying drawing is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In eyeglass construction, in combination, a lens having an edge comprising a groove and a pair of fiat surfaces, said pair of flat surfaces being positioned adjacent the planar surfaces of said lens, an eyewire having a pair of flat surfaces and a ridge formed on the surface of said eyewire which is juxtaposed to said lens edge when said eyewire and said lens are in assembled relationship, said eyewire flat surfaces being positioned opposite said lens edge flat surfaces and said ridge extending into said groove, the crosssectional area of said ridge being smaller in all dimensions than the cross-sectional area of said groove and a cement cushion positioned between said eyewire and said lens edge, said cement filling the space between said ridge and groove and thus coacting with said ridge to prevent lateral movement of said lens with respect to said eyewire.

2. In eyeglass construction, in combination, a lens having an edge including a groove bounded by a pair of flat surfaces, and an eyewire including a body portion having a ridge formed thereon, said body portion being thin and substantially flat and extending forwardly and rearwardly beyond the planar surfaces of said lens, said ridge extending into said groove and said body portion being juxtaposed to said fiat surfaces, the cross-sectional area of said ridge being smaller in all dimensions than the cross-sectional area of said groove, and a cement positioned between said eyewire and said lens edge to form a resilient cushion therebetween, said cement filling the space between said ridge and said groove and thus coacting with said ridge to prevent lateral movement of said lens with respect to said eyewire.

3. In eyeglass construction, in combination, a lens having an edge including a groove bounded by a pair of flat surfaces, an eyewire including a body portion having a ridge formed thereon, said ridge extending into said groove and said body portion being juxtaposed to said flat surfaces when said eyewire and said lens are in assembled relationship, a plurality of openings formed in said ridge extending transversely thereof, and a cement positioned between said eyewire and said lens edge.

4. In eyeglass construction, in combination, a lens having an edge including a groove bounded by a pair of flat surfaces, an eyewire including a body portion having a ridge formed thereon, said ridge extending into said groove and said body portion being juxtaposed to said fiat surfaces when said eyewire and said lens are in assembled relationship, said ridge being smaller in cross-section than the cross-sectional area of said groove, a plurality of transverse openings formed in said ridge, and a cement positioned between said eyewire and said lens, said cement extending into said transverse openings.

5. In eyeglass construction, in combination, a lens having an edge comprising a groove and a pair of fiat surfaces, said flat surfaces being adjacent the planar surfaces of said lens, an eye wire including a substantially fiat thin body portion having a ridge formed thereon, the crosssectional area of said ridge being as great as the cross-sectional area of the body portion of said eyewire, said body portion extending around the periphery of said lens and being juxtaposed to said lens edge flat surfaces, and a plurality of openings in said eyewire extending transversely thereacross.

GEORGE E. NERNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4022524 *Oct 31, 1975May 10, 1977Cesare FlorioEyeglass frame
US4340282 *Nov 12, 1980Jul 20, 1982Mamoru MurakamiLens securing device
US6588897 *May 31, 2002Jul 8, 2003No. 1308676 Ontario, Inc.Safety eyeglasses frame
EP0083918A1 *Dec 23, 1982Jul 20, 1983A. Schmied Silhouette-Modellbrillen Fabrikationsgesellschaft m.b.H.Plastics spectacle frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification351/154, 351/140
International ClassificationG02C1/06, G02C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG02C1/06
European ClassificationG02C1/06