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Publication numberUS2270703 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1942
Filing dateNov 22, 1939
Priority dateNov 22, 1939
Publication numberUS 2270703 A, US 2270703A, US-A-2270703, US2270703 A, US2270703A
InventorsErnest E Bernard
Original AssigneeErnest E Bernard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary separator
US 2270703 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 20, 1942. E. E;.BERNARD 2,270,703

ROTARY S'EPARATQR Filed Nov. 22, 1939 Inventor Patented Jan. 20, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2 Claims.

This invention relates to rotary screens or separators and an object of the invention is to provide a device of this character particularly designed for separating rocks and foreign matter from dirt, gravel and the like so that this finer material can be used in the construction of roadways, drives, and the like; and the invention together with its objects and advantages will be understood from a study of the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein Figure l is an elevational view of the separator.

Figure 2 is an end elevational view thereof.

Figure 3 is a sectional view through the rotary drum, and

Figure 4 is a sectional view through the rotary drum taken at right angles to Figure 3.

Referring to the drawing by reference numerals it will be seen that the rotary separator, in the preferred embodiment thereof, comprises a pair of opposed bearing standards 5--5, which support therebetween a driven shaft 6 the ends of which are journaled in the bearings of the standards.

Mounted on the shaft 6 and secured thereto in any suitable manner to rotate with the shaft is a screen-drum I that in the present instance consists of an elongated hub 8 on the ends of which are suitably mounted end plates 9. The end plates 9 are common to inner and outer cylinders l0 and II respectively.

The outer cylinder II is composed of a plurality of laterally spaced rings l2 of metal, wire, or other suitable material that are held suitably spaced from one another by tie-rods I3 the ends of which are secured to the end plates 9 through the medium of pairs of nuts M as shown.

The inner cylinder II) is also composed of a plurality of rings of wire, metal or other suitable material that are closely spaced laterally relative to one another and are secured in suitably spaced relation from one another through the medium of tie-rods I6 that are secured at their ends to the end plates 9 through the medium of pairs of nuts l1.

It will be noted that the rings I2 of the outer cylinder II are spaced farther apart than the rings IS, the arrangement preferably being such that the rings I2 are concentric to alternate rings l5.

Also disposed on the outer cylinder ll intermediate the ends of the latter is a continuous circular pilot track 18 that engages the periphery of a pilot roller l9 suitably supported beneath the separator through the medium of bearing standards 20. Obviously pilot roller l9 and pilot track l8 cooperate to support the separator at the center of the latter. The track I8 has portions thereof connected with the hub 8 by the radial brace rods 8'.

While any suitable means may be provided for revolving the separator, shaft 6 thereof is provided adjacent one end with a gear 2| for cooperation with other gearing forming part of a transmission mechanism for transmitting drive to the shaft from a suitable prime mover or source of power.

Also, suitably mounted at intervals between the inner and outer cylinders l0 and II and extending longitudinally of the separator are baffle plates 22. These bafile plates are arranged substantially tangentially with the inner cylinder and prevent material coming through the outer cylinder from falling to the bottom of the space between the two cylinders which would clog the machine.

In actual practice the material to be separated or screened is picked up by a conveyor 23 and discharged onto the screen at the point indicated in Figure 4 by the notation loading point. The receiving conveyor 44 is placed adjacent the bottom of the device and to the left thereof and the device rotates in the direction of the arrow shown in Figure 4. The material dropping upon the outer cylinder from the conveyor 23 tends to move along with the outer cylinder but, of course, the dirt and small particles will drop through both cylinders upon the ground under the device. The large rocks will pass along with the upper cylinder and eventually drop from the left hand portion thereof upon the conveyor 24 and the small rocks dropping through the outer cylinder will fall upon the inner cylinder and such small rocks will pass around with the small cylinder and eventually slide over the baffle plates through the large cylinder and drop upon the conveyor 24. As will be seen from Figure 4 when a baffle plate reaches discharging position it slopes downwardly and outwardly so as to direct the smaller rocks from the inner cylinder through the outer cylinder onto the conveyor 24.

As before stated this inventon is mainly intended for use in separating rocks and relatively large bodies of foreign matter from dirt, gravel and the like so that the finer material can be used in the construction of roadways, drives and the like, with the large rocks and foreign matter removed therefrom.

By providing the inner and outer cylinders with the rings of the inner cylinder placed closer together than those of the outer cylinder, large and small rocks are removed from the dirt and gravel with such dirt or gravel dropping through the device back upon the road-bed or other surface and also by using the two cylinders there is less danger of the apparatus becoming clogged as the larger rocks are first removed from the material by the larger and outer "cylinder and the smaller rocks dropping through the rings of the large cylinder are caught by the rings of the inner cylinder and removed from the dirt or gravel dropping through the device. By the use of this device the material is more thoroughly screened and with less danger of the apparatus becoming clogged than if but one cylinder was used instead of the two cylinders arranged and constructed as specified.

Having thus described the invention what is claimed .as new is:

1. In a separator of the .class described, a rotary screen horizontally arranged and comprising inner and outer concentric cylinders, each of said cylinders having a peripheral wall composed of a plurality of laterally spaced rings, the rings of the inner cylinder being arranged closer .together'than those of the outer cylinder, means for :depositinglthe material totbe separated upon the outer cylinder adjacent the top thereof, means for rotating the screen in a direction 'to cause the material to pass upwardly from the conveyor, the large particles being carried along with the outer cylinder and dropping from the same as the portions containing the large 'parr ticlesstart to move downwardly, a conveyor for receiving the particles dropping from the large cylinder, the small particles droppingthrough the rings of the outer cylinder falling upon the inner cylinder which conveys these-particles to ,a point where they drop upon the last-mentioned conveyor, finer particles dropping through both cylinders, circumferentially spaced baflle plates located between the cylinders and arranged substantially tangentially to the inner cylinder and each baflie plate sloping downwardly and outwardly at the discharge point of the device.

2. In a separator of the class described, a rotary screen horizontally arranged and comprising inner and outer concentric cylinders, each of said cylinders having a peripheral wall composed of a plurality of laterally spaced rings, the rings of the inner cylinder being arranged closer together than those of the outer cylinder, means for depositing the material to be separated upon the .outer cylinder adjacent the top thereof, means for rotating the screen in a direction to cause the material to pass upwardly from the conveyor, thelarge particles being carried along with the outer cylinder and dropping from the same as the portions containing the large particles start to move downwardly, a conveyor for receiving the particles dropping from the large cylinder, the small particles dropping through the ringsof the outer cylinder falling upon the inner cylinder which conveys these particles to a point where they drop upon the last-mentioned conveyor, finer particles dropping through both cylinders, circumferentially spaced baffie plates located between the cylinders and arranged substantially tangentially to the inner cylinder and each baffle plate sloping downwardly and outwardly .at the discharge point of the device, a trackforming ring surrounding the central portion of the outer cylinder and connected therewith, a hub passing through the center of the inner cylinder, brace rods connecting the track with the .hub.

ERNEST E. BERNARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2857691 *Feb 13, 1956Oct 28, 1958M J Crose Mfg Company IncPipeline ditch filling and pipe padding machine
US4935124 *May 2, 1989Jun 19, 1990International Paper CompanyRotatable wood chip classifier
US5421108 *Feb 18, 1993Jun 6, 1995Capitan Trencher Corp.High volume pipe padding machine
US6125558 *Apr 12, 1995Oct 3, 2000Capitan Trencher Corp.High volume pipe padding machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/285, 209/393, 209/411
International ClassificationB07B1/18
Cooperative ClassificationB07B1/18
European ClassificationB07B1/18