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Publication numberUS2271589 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1942
Filing dateJun 21, 1939
Priority dateJun 21, 1939
Publication numberUS 2271589 A, US 2271589A, US-A-2271589, US2271589 A, US2271589A
InventorsHendrickson Jack L
Original AssigneeHazel Atlas Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auxiliary sponge container
US 2271589 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 3, 1942. J HENDRICKSQN 2,271,589

AUXILIARY S PONGE CONTAINER Filed June 21, 1939 Patented Feb. 3, 1942.

AUXILIARY SPONGE CONTAINER Jack L. Hendrickson, Wheeling, W. Va., assignor to Hazel-Atlas Glass Company,

Wheeling,

W. Va., a corporation of West Virginia Application June 21, 1939, Serial No. 280,385

4 Claims.

stances, etc., it is desirable to have the applicator,

such as a sponge, associated with the container which carries the substance to be applied, so that the applicator will be kept clean and in good condition, and will always be handy when required. One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a combination package of this type.

Another object of the invention is to provide a combined package of this character in which the applicator, when housed, will be visible from the exterior of the package.

A further object of the invention is to provide a combined package of this character which is inexpensive in manufacture, and yet is very efiicient in operation and attractive in appearance.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the closure.

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view of the closure.

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of the cover member which houses the sponge or other applicator.

Figure 4 is an elevational View of the cover member inverted; and

Figure 5 is a Vertical sectional view of the combined package.

Referring to the drawing in more detail, numeral I indicates a metallic closure having a top rim portion 2 and a depending skirt 3. The lower portion of the skirt is incurled to form a bead 4, and extending inwardly thereof are the desired number of spaced lugs 5, four of these spaced lugs being employed in the present embodiment.

Numeral 6 refers to a glass container which may be of any desired shape or size, and in which is packed the shoe polish or cleaning substance. The neck of the container is provided with the usual inclined glass lugs l, with which the closure lugs 5 cooperate. When the closure is placed on the container and rotated these glass lugs draw the closure downwardly into sealing position on the container, in the well known manner. While I have illustrated and described one particular form of lug cap, it will be obvious that any other type of lug cap may be employed, and it will also be obvious that in place of a lug cap I may employ a screw cap. In other words, the invention is not limited to any particular means for locking the cap on the container.

Inwardly of the top rim portion 2 of the closure is an elevated annular flange 8, which is substantially flat and is integrally connected with the rim portion 2. The large central opening 9 in the closure is provided for receiving the cover. and the inner periphery of the elevated flange 8 is provided with three notches ID for temporarily locking the cover in place.

The cover is referred to by numeral II, and in the preferred form illustrated is made of transparent glass. If preferred it may be made of colored or opaque glass, metal or any other suitable material. This cover comprises a top portion l2 and a depending wall 13. Extending downwardly from the wall 13 is a neck portion M, which in the present embodiment is of less thickness than the wall, to form a shoulder I5. Extending outwardly from the neck portion are three spaced glass lugs l6 which cooperate with the notches Ill in the closure. Of course the number of notches and lugs may be varied as desired.

The flange 8 is also preferably provided with a plurality of spaced downwardly projecting ribs ll. The ends of the ribs are preferably tapered upwardly. On rotating the glass cover with respect to the closure, the glass lugs will ride up on the ribs to frictionally lock the cover in place and prevent it from rattling.

Numeral [8 refers to a liner which is arranged in the top of the closure, and which may be made of any suitable material. If the liner is made of cardboard or the like, it should be waterproofed on both sides. An applicator I 9, such as a sponge, is housed in the glass cover, and is held in place by the liner.

The parts are shown assembled in Figure 5, to form the combination package. When the shoe polish or other substance is to be used, the cover I l is rotated to bring the lugs l 6 into alignment with the notches Ill, and the cover is removed to give access to the sponge. The closure is then rotated to release it from the jar 6 which contains the shoe polish or other substance which is to be used with the sponge. Of course the closure can first be removed from the jar, and the cover then removed from the closure, if preferred.

The sponge is now used to apply the shoe polish in the jar to the shoes, or to apply any other substance in the jar. Thereafter the closure is returned to sealing position on the jar, the sponge is replaced in the space provided in the cover II, the lugs l6 of the cover are passed through the notches ID in the closure, and the cover is rotated, whereupon the lugs ride up on the ribs I! to frictionally lock the cover in place. Or. if preferred, the cover with the sponge can first be secured on the closure, and the closure then secured on the jar.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that the invention provides a most convenient package for holding an applicator in position ready for use in applying the contents of the container. It will also be apparent that the package will keep the applicator clean and in good condition, and that the package is attractive in appearance and is inexpensive in manufacture.

Having fully described the invention, what I claim is:

1. An auxiliary sponge container, including a metallic closure for a receptacle, said closure formed of a single piece of sheet metal and including a top, said top having a central opening and a flat annular portion adjacent the periphery of the top, a liner in said closure in position to cooperate with the annular flat portion of the closure top and the neck of the receptacle to seal the latter, an integral skirt depending from the outer periphery of the fiat annular portion, means on the depending skirt 'for engaging exterior projections on the receptacle neck to lock the closure on the receptacle by rotation, a

sponge retaining glass cover, means for remo'vably securing the glass cover in mouth-down position on the top of the closure in alignment with said opening, and said liner acting as a closure for the mouth of the sponge retaining cover.

2. An auxiliary sponge container, including a metallic closure for a receptacle, said closure formed of a single piece of sheet metal and including a top, said top having a central opening and a flat annular portion adjacent the periphery of the top, a liner in said closure in position to cooperate with the annular flat portion of the closure top and the neck of the receptacle to seal the latter, an integral skirt depending from the outer periphery of the flat annular portion, means on the depending skirt for engaging exterior projections on the receptacle neck to lock the closure on the receptacle by rotation, a sponge retaining transparent cover, means for removably securing the transparent cover in mouth-down position on the top of the closure in alignment with said opening, and said liner acting as a closure for the mouth of the sponge retaining cover.

3. An auxiliary sponge container, including a metallic closure for a receptacle, said closure formed of a single piece of sheet metal and including a top, said top having a central opening, spaced notches provided in the metal surrounding the opening, said top having a flat annular portion adjacent the periphery of the top, a liner .in said closure in position to cooperate with the annular fiat portion of the closure top and the neck of the receptacle to seal the latter, an integral skirt depending from the outer periphery of the flat annular portion, means on the de- I pending skirt for engaging exterior projections on the receptacle neck to lock the closure on the receptacle by rotation, a sponge retaining glass cover, spaced glass lugs on the glass cover a'djacent its mouth, the said notches in the closure top and the lugs 0n the cover cooperating to removably secure the cover in mouth-down position on the top of the closure in alignment with said opening, and said liner acting as a closure for the mouth of the sponge retaining cover.

4. An auxiliary sponge container, including a metallic closure for a receptacle, said closure formed of a single piece of sheet metal and .including a top, said top having a central opening. spaced notches provided in the metal surrounding the opening, said top having a flat annular portion adjacent the periphery of the top, a liner in said closure in position to cooperate with the annular fiat portion of the closure top and the neck of the receptacle to seal the latter, an integral skirt depending from the outer periphery of the flat annular portion, means 'on the depending skirt for engaging exterior projections on the receptacle neck to lock the closure on the receptacle by rotation, a sponge retaining glass cover, spaced glass lugs on the glass cover adjacent its mouth, said lugs adapted to pass down wardly through the said notches in the closure top, ribs projecting downwardly from the closure top, said ribs adapted to be frictionally engaged by the glass lugs on the cover when the cover is rotated, and said liner acting as a closure for the mouth of the sponge retaining cover.

JACK L. HENDRICKSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2936089 *Jan 17, 1957May 10, 1960Goldfarb Adolph EPackaging means and method for premiums and the like
US2979193 *Feb 2, 1959Apr 11, 1961American Can CoMerchandising package
US3413128 *May 8, 1967Nov 26, 1968Preferida IncBottle
US4165815 *Jan 23, 1978Aug 28, 1979Vetter Kathryn ACosmetic container with cleaning surface
US5064082 *Apr 27, 1990Nov 12, 1991Elizabeth Arden Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Compartmented container having a seal member and magnifying lid
US6070752 *Sep 25, 1998Jun 6, 2000East End, Inc.Combined merchandise container and display device
US6196411Jun 15, 1999Mar 6, 2001East End, Inc.Combined merchandise container and display device
US6299014Jun 1, 2000Oct 9, 2001East End, Inc.Combined merchandise container and display device
US6302288Jun 1, 2000Oct 16, 2001East End, Inc.Combined merchandise container and display device
US7210577Jan 30, 2004May 1, 2007East End, Inc.Cover and media disk display apparatus for a container
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/522, 401/125, 215/6, 15/258
International ClassificationA47L23/05, B65D51/24, A47L23/00, B65D51/28
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/05, B65D51/28
European ClassificationB65D51/28, A47L23/05