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Publication numberUS2271896 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1942
Filing dateApr 27, 1940
Priority dateApr 27, 1940
Publication numberUS 2271896 A, US 2271896A, US-A-2271896, US2271896 A, US2271896A
InventorsHarry H Lewis
Original AssigneeHarry H Lewis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carbonator
US 2271896 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. H. LEWIS Feb. '3, 1942.

CARBONATOR Filed April 27, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheei 1 lnvenor Harry H. Lewis Azzforn .9

H. H. LEWIS Feb. 3, 1942.

CARBONATOR Filed April 27, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m MQ lflvenfar Harry H Lewis At'zorneys Patented Feb. 3, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE CARBONATOR Harry B. Lewis, Portland, on

Application April 27, 1940, Serial No. 331,999

6 Claims.

- soda fountains and the like, or in carbonating any beverage to be dispensed.

Specifically, this invention concerns a carbonator in which the liquid is sprayed into a chamber of gas, instead of the ,gas being injected into a volume of liquid.

A problem in all carbonating devices is to obtain the desired carbonating or aerating of the liquid most efiiciently but in a minimum length of time, and an object of this invention is to provide an improved device which will be simple and inexpensive of constructionbut which will insure the proper carbonating of the liquid injected into the device and subsequently withdrawn from it.

Another object of this invention is to provide a carbohating device which will function automatically to maintain a supply of the carbonated liquid and control automatically the passage of liquid into the device without'necessitating the use of the common float-operated valve required in most devices of this type.

In certain carbonating devices which have previously been tried out and in which the liquid is sprayed into a chamber containing carbonic acid gas, I have found that ordinarily the passage of the spray 'or cone of liquid from its entrance into the chamber until is reaches tlmolume of liquid at the bottom of the chamber does not permit suflicient absorption of gas by the sprayed liquid, and the result with such devices is that the operation either has to be repeated or other meansmust be employed for mixing the gas with the liquid in the chamber after the sprayed liquid has been collected at the bottom of the cham-' her. I have discovered, however, that when the liquid is forceably injected in the form of a very fine high velocity spray into the end of an elongated gas-filled chamber, the globules of liquid will be caused to rebound repeatedly from the wall surface in the interior of the chamber, and also from the surface of the liquid at the bottom of the elongated chamber, until finally coming to rest, and this rebounding of the globules of sprayed liquid permits them to become thoroughly impregnated with the gas before they finally settle to rest and join the liquid in the bottom of the chamber, resulting in very high carbonization of the liquid.

A further object of this invention, therefore, is to provide a device in' which this method of Figure l to form (Cl- 26l-115) Y I impregnating globules of liquid may be carried 7 out efilciently and under automatic control.

The manner in which Iattain these and inci' dental objects, and also the manner in'which tl apparatus and controls for the same are cor. structed and function, willbe briefly describe with reference to the accompanying drawing constituting part of this specification.

,In the drawings: 7

Figure-1 is a side elevation of my improved carbonator, shown partly in section with certain parts broken away to reveal the interior details of construction, and showing also the courses taken by the globules of the high velocity spray of liquid;

Figure 2 is a similar side elevation showing the position of the charging chamber when the liquid contained has been reduced to, a low level; and

Figure 3 is a corresponding view similar to Figure 2 but illustrating the position of the device diameter. A blank head l2 seals the outer free end .of the shell, and a substantial annular head casting l3, fitted with a removable cover plate or cap I 4, constitutes the closure at the other end, these parts being assembled as shown in a pressure vessel or carbonating chamber.

The entire chamber or vessel I0 is hingeably supported at one end on a suitable base it by means of transversely extending Pins 16 which are made fast'in the lower part of the annular head casting i3 andwhich are'fjournaled in spaced upstanding brackets I11 which form part; of the fixed base l5. This hinged end 'of'the vessel is provided with a depending arm is (seef- Figure 1) to which a rod 20 is pivotally attached The rod 20' extends through; and is slideably disposed in a guiding holearrang ed in the upstanding shoulder 2| of the :base I5. A", compression spring .22 is carried on the rod, 20 and bears against a loose collar 23 which in turn at l9.

bears on the outside of the shoulder 2 i The outer end of the spring 22 bears against the nut 24 von the end of the rod 20 and the tension of the I spring22 may be adjusted by meansof the nut 24. This spring tension is adjusted so as to exert just sufiicient pull on therod 20 to balance the combined weight of the vessel It. and a predetermined volume of liquid in the bottom of the vessel as indicated in Figure 1.

Thus the spring 22 is so adjusted that when the amount of liquid in the bottom of the vessel It has been reduced to the level indicated by the :broken line in Figure 2, the spring will cause ,the vessel to tilt upwardly; but when the volume of liquid in the vessel is sufllciently increased, for example, until the level of the liquid reaches that indicated by the broken line in Figure 3,'the weight or the liquid will cause the spring 22 to compress until the vessel is tilted downwardly as shown in Figure 3. The purpose of this tiltable mounting for the vessel, l will-be hereinafter explained.

A conventional mercuroid electrical switch 25 is attached to the vessel It in such manner that when the vessel is in the positions shown in Figures 1 and 2, the mercury within the switch will bridge the gap between the conductors 26 and 21 and thereby act to close the electrical circuit to the driving motor M (Fig. 2), of the pump P which supplies liquid to the vessel. Similarly, when the vessel is tilted downwardly to a predetermined degree, for example, to the position shown in Figure 3, the mercury switch will open prevent further operation of such motor.

The pump P (Fig. 2), connected to the water pipe line, or to any other source from which the liquid to be carbonated is obtained, is connected to the vessel by the flexible tube 28. The end Another flexible tube 3| connects the vessel l0- with a storage tank (not shown) or other suitable source of carbonic acid gas in which the gas is carried under high pressure and from which the gas is delivered through a pressure-reducing valve (not shown), which reduces the pressure to that which is desired to be maintained within the vessel l0, and thence through the flexible tube 3| to the vessel 10. A plug 32 threaded into the head casting I3, provides means for relieving the gas pressure in the vessel l0 should it become necessary to remove the cover plate from the vessel for cleaning or for any other purpose.

The water or other liquid, after being charged with the carbonic acid gas, maybe drawn from the vessel as required through the pipe 33 which is disposed in the cover plate I! and which has an extending end 34 curved downwardly so that th entrance into the end 34 will be submerged in the liquid in the bottom of the vessel at all times. The discharge pipe 33 has a suitable manual control valve (not shown) of the usual type so that the discharge pipe 33 will be shut oft-at all times except when it is desired to draw charged liquid from the vessel.

When the water or other liquid to be carbonated is delivered to the vessel III in the form of a high. velocity atomized spray, the globules of liquid from-the comically-shaped spray will strike the inside walls of vessel III, or the surface of any liquid at the bottom of the vessel, at various angles andb'e deflected in the manner indicated by the arrows in Figure 1. As a result these globules will bounce back andforth more or less, following largely a zig-zag course to the opposite end of the vessel. The reason for making the vessel elongate will now be apparent since the longer these globules of liquid remain in motion, before flnally settling to rest in the colthe circuit through conductors 26 and 21 and thus .carbonic acid gas.

sprayed into the vessel asupply of charged water lected liquid in the bottom of the vessel, the

greater will be the opportunity aflorded them for and the force of the atomized spray or velocity of th globules be sutflcient to produce this desired result on the traveling globules during their course through the chamber. It is also important that too much liquid should not be allowed to accumulate within the chamber or vessel III, for of course theaction of the globules could not occur and the liquid could not be delivered in 'a spray if the level of the liquid in thebottom of the vessel were to reach a heighth sufllcient to obstruct the nozzle 30. q

The operation of my device is very simple. Let it be assumed that the carbonator is to be used for carbonating water. '.The vessel I0 is connected through tube 3| to the usual carbonic acid gas storage tank, which causes the vessel to be filled with the gas under pressure. When the vessel I0 is empty of liquid the spring 22 will hold the vessel in the upwardly inclined position shown in Figure 2 to start. Water is then supplied through tube 28 by means of the electrically-operated pump P (Fig. 2), and the pump will operate as soon as the electric power is turned on through switch S, inasmuch as the circuit to the pump over the conductors 28 and 21 is closed by the mercury switch 25 as indicated in Figure 2. The water, due to the force of the pump, will be delivered in the end of vessel It in the form of an atomized high velocity spray, as previously explained, and the globules of the water, before coming to rest and collecting in the bottom of the vessel, will be impregnated by the As water continues to be gradually collects in the bottom of the vessel where it is maintained under pressure and from which the charged water may be obtained as needed merely by opening a manual valve or faucet (not shown) at the end of the discharge pipe 33. As the supply of charged water in the bottom of the vessel It increases, .thus increasing the weight of water in the vessel, the vessel gradually tilts downwardly against the force of the spring 22 until it is finally tilted suiflciently to cause the mercury switch 25 to open the circuit to the pump, which will occur in some position of the vessel as that shown in Figure 3. This automatically stops the operation of the pump andno more water can be collected in the vessel It until some of the charged water is first removed. Withdrawal of a sufllcient amount of I this supply of charged water will cause the spring 22 again to raise the vessel, flrst to the horizontal position illustrated in Figure 1, and then, if more of the charged water is withdrawn, to the extreme position shown in Figure 2. A suitable stop 35 (Figure l) is provided to prevent the vessel.

being tilted upwardly too far. In ordinary use however, the range of the change of position of the vessel will, in most cases, be only between the horizontal position of Figure l and the downwardly tilted position of Figure .3.

Thus the action of my apparatus is entirely automatic. All that is necessary is that when one supply tank of the carbonic acid gas is exhausted, another be connected to the tube 3|. Unlike some of the other carbonators previously invented, in my device the pump supplying liquidfloat-control valves is dispensed with-entirely,

and only a simple and inexpensive mercury switch, attached in'any convenient point on the outside of the tiltable vessel, is all that is required. As long as any liquid remains in the vessel lo, the inner end 34 of the discharge pipe 33 will re'malnsubmerged, due to the upward tilting. of the vessel as the level of liquid becomes lower., The maximum amount of liquid which can collect in the vessel is regulatedby adjusting the tension of the screw 22 by means of the nut 24 on ,the rod 20. All danger of flooding the carbonating chamber is prevented. The liquid accumulated in the bottom of the vessel is also kept in a state of agitation, as long as the pump is operating, due to the striking of the surface of the liquid by the globules of liquid set in motion by the spray. This agitation of the device in producing the bouncing motion desired for the globules of liquid. Under the direct pulsating action of the reciprocating pump the pre sure at the distributing nozzle will vary between certain high and low limits with each cycle 'of the pump piston. This variance in the force of the spray from the nozzle will affect not only the force with which the globules are projected into the chamber and against the walls of the chamber, but also the angles at which the globules strike the walls and the corresponding angles of accumulated liquid has a desirable effect in causing the liquid to continue to absorb more and more of the gas in the pressure chamber.

In my device the pump supplying the spray of liquid will not be caused to operate every time a small amount of the carbonated liquid is withdrawn from the vessel, due to the fact that a considerable volume of liquid is allowed to accumulate in the vessel. A delay provided by the required tilting of the vessel in order to overcome the increasing resistance of the spring 22 also provides a desirable time differential between the starting and stopping of the pump. This is an a important feature of my device and an improvement in this respect over some of the float-control carbonators inwhich withdrawal of a comparatively small amount of the carbonated liquid is sufficient to cause the motor immediately to start operating. Thus, referring to Figures 2 and 3, it will be noted that as liquid accumulates in the vessel ID the level of the liquid, and consequently the weight of the liquid, increases much more rapidly at the left end or movable end of the vessel than at the other end, due to the downward tilting of the vessel. The increased rate at which the level and weight of the liquid are augmented atone end, in comparison with the rate occurring at the opposite end, is accompanied by increased resistance offered by the spring 22 as its compression increases, since a greater and greater force is required to produce equal further longitudinal compression of any compression spring. The result of this arrangement is that when the vessel is filled to the predetermined maximum, the withdrawal of a subapparatus arid'furthermore that it is not necessary to provide any air dome or other pressure chamber between the pump and thedelivery nozzle, that it, in fact, is even desirable to have the spray pulsating under the impulses of the,

reciprocating, pump. A pulsating spray I have found to be even better than a steady spray in my deflection. It will be apparent that this variance in the courses taken by the globules at different moments will result in more widespread distribution ofthe globules and intermingling of the moving globules with the ga in the chamber than might occur if the globules folloiwed constant courses under a steady pressure spray.

Various modifications of course may be made in the apparatus which I have described without departing from the principles of my invention. All that is necessary is that a high velocity spray of liquid be injected into a gas-filled vessel and the vessel so shaped and arranged that the globules of liquid will be forced to take courses which are sufficiently tortuous and long to afiord opportunity for the globules to become properly impregnated with the gas before coming to rest, and that suitable controls be provided. The particular simplecontrols which I have described, including the adjustable compression spring, mercury switch, and gravity actuated carbonating chamber, I consider to be most preferable in the carrying out of my invention.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for Jcarbonating liquids comprising an elongated sealed substantially horizontal vessel, a stationary support for said vessel, said vessel being pivotally-mounted on said support, one end of said vessel movable in a short vertical are, a spray nozzle located in one end of said vessel, means for delivering liquid to said nozzle under pressure, said means including a motor, means for supplying gas under pressure to said vessel, a liquid discharging outlet located at the bottom of said vessel, an electric switch in the circuit to said motor operated by the pivotal movement of ,said vessel, spring means controlling the position of said vessel, said spring means arranged to permit said vessel to tilt when the liquid in said vessel has reached a predetermined maximum to cause said switch to open, whereupon the greatest depth of liquid will be at the end of said vessel opposite said nozzle, and requiring a substantial quantity'of liquid then to be drawn from said vessel before said. vessel will return to said minimum position and start said motor operating.

2. An apparatus'for carbonating liquids comprising an elongated sealed substantially horizontal vessel, its length being several times its width, is; stationary support for said vessel, said vessel being pivotally-mounted on said support, one end of said vessel movable in a short vertical arc, a spray nozzle located in one end of said vessel, means for delivering liquid to said nozzle underpressure, said means including a motor, means for supplying gas under pressure to said vessel, a liquid discharging outlet located at the bottom of said vessel near the nozzle supporting end, an electric switch in the circuit to said motor operated by the pivotal movement of said vessel, spring means controlling the position of said vessel, said spring means arranged -to hold said vessel tilted slightly upwardly when the liquid in .said vessel has reached a predetermined minimum to close said switch, with the greatest depth of liquid at the nozzle end or said vessel, but to permit said vesselto tilt downwardly to open said switch when the liquid in said vessel has reached a predetermined maximum causing the greatest supplying gas under pressure to said vessel, a' liquid discharging outletlocated at the bottomof said vessel, an electric switch in the circuit to said motor operated by the pivotal movement said vessel, spring counter-balancing means for said vessel, said spring means arranged to hold said vessel tilted slightly upwardly when the liquid in said vessel has reached'a predetermined minimum to close the switch .to said motor, with the greatest depth of liquid at the nozzle end of said vessel, but to permit said vessel to tilt downwardly when the liquid in said vessel has reached a predetermined maximum to open said switch, thus causing the greatest depth of liquid to be at the end of said vessel opposite said nozzle, and to require a substantial quantity of liquid then to be drawn from said vessel before said vessel will return to said minimum position and start said motor operating.

4. An apparatus for carbonating liquids comprising an elongatedsealed cylindrical substantially horizontal vessel, its length being several times its diameter, a stationary support for said vessel, said vessel being pivoted to said support at one end, the other end of said vessel movable in a short vertical are, a spray nozzle located in the supported end of said vessel, a pump delivering liquid to said nozzle under pressure, a motor operating said pump, means for supplying gas under pressure to said vessel, a liquid discharging outlet located near the supported end of said vessel, a mercury switch in the circuit to said motor attached to said vessel operated by the pivotal movement of said vessel, spring counter-balancing means for said vessel, said spfiig means arranged to hold said vessel tiltedslightly upwardly to close said switch when the liquid in said vessel has reached a predetermined minimum, with the greatest depth of liquid at the supported end of said vessel, but to permit said vessel to tilt downwardly to open said switch when the liquid in said vessel has reached a predetermined maximum causing the greatest depth of liquid to be at the opposite end of said vessel, whereby a substantial quantity or liquid must be drawn from said vessel when said vessel is in downward tilted maximum position before said vessel will return to said minimum position and start said motor operating.

5. In anapparatus for carbonating liquids, an

elongated sealed cylindrical substantially hori-- zontal vessel, a stationary support for said vessel,

. said vessel being pivotally-mounted on said support at one end, the other end of said vessel mov- "able in a short vertical are, a spray nozzle 10-- cated in the supported end of said vessel, a pump delivering liquid to said nozzle under pressure, a motor operating said pump, means for supplying gas under pressure to said vessel, a liquid discharging outlet located at the bottom '01 said vessel near the'supported end, a mercury switch inthe circuit to said motor attached to said vessel operated by the pivotal movement of said vessel, an arm depending from said vessel, a horizontal rod' pivotally-attached to said arm, means slidably supporting said rod, a compression spring on said rod so arranged as to oiler resistance to the pull on said rod caused by the downward tilting of said vessel, whereby a substantial quantity of liquid must be drawn from said vessel when said vessel is in downward tilted maximum position before said spring will return said vessel to its raised position to start said motor operating.

6. In an apparatus for carbonating liquids, an elongated sealed cylindrical substantially horizontal vessel, its length being several times its,

diameter, a stationary support for said vessel, said vessel being pivotally mounted on said support at one end, the other end of said vessel movable in a short vertical are, a spray nozzle located in the supported end of said vessel, means for delivering liquid to said nozzle under pressure, said means including a motor, means for supplying gas under pressure to said vessel, a

liquid discharging outlet located near the supported end of said vessel, a mercury switch in the circuit to said motor attached to said vessel operated by the pivotal movement of said vessel, spring counter-balancing means for said vessel, said spring means including an arm depending from said vessel, a horizontal rod pivotally-attached to said arm, means slidably supporting said rod, a compression spring on said rod so arranged as to offer resistance to the pull on said rod caused by the downward tilting of saidlvessel, whereby, upon the tilting of said vessel, the greatest depth of liquid will be at the end opposite said spray nozzle and said vessel will tilt when, it contains its maximum quantity, and whereby a substantial quantity of liquid must be drawn from said vessel when said vessel is in downward tilted maximum position before said vessel will return to said minimum position and HARRY H. LEWIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2511172 *Dec 28, 1945Jun 13, 1950Lyon Ind IncPressure operated switch
US2541757 *Oct 25, 1945Feb 13, 1951Cleveland Detroit CorpLiquid and gas contact apparatus
US2573158 *Mar 7, 1949Oct 30, 1951Walter E MuthAir humidifier
US2575267 *Sep 10, 1947Nov 13, 1951Gottlieb LouisApparatus for producing charged water
US2588677 *Feb 26, 1948Mar 11, 1952Carbonic Dispenser IncAutomatic liquid carbonator
US3617032 *Sep 3, 1968Nov 2, 1971Cornelius CoCarbonator and method of carbonation
US5259997 *Mar 3, 1993Nov 9, 1993Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd.Spraying water into perforated bowl; supplying carbonic acid; high speed
US6142456 *Apr 23, 1997Nov 7, 2000Idec Izumi CorporationMethod and apparatus for dissolving and mixing gas and liquid
US6767009Dec 17, 2001Jul 27, 2004The Coca-Cola CompanyCarbonator with targeted carbonation level
USRE37499 *Nov 9, 1995Jan 8, 2002Sanyo Electric Co., LtdApparatus for manufacturing carbonated water
WO2003051499A2 *Dec 17, 2002Jun 26, 2003Coca Cola CoCarbonator with targeted carbonation level
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/27, 261/DIG.700, 261/19, 261/115
International ClassificationB01F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0057, B01F3/04808, Y10S261/07
European ClassificationB67D1/00H4, B01F3/04C8G