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Publication numberUS2272675 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1942
Filing dateMar 11, 1940
Priority dateMar 11, 1940
Publication numberUS 2272675 A, US 2272675A, US-A-2272675, US2272675 A, US2272675A
InventorsKnudsen George M
Original AssigneeKnudsen George M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal separator
US 2272675 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 10, 1942. G. M. KNUDSEN 2372575 GENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR Filed March 11, 1940 50 3 IE; .1; i

INVENTOR. GEO/P65 M KNUDSEN BY ATTORNEY.

Patented Feb. 10, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT orrlca CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR George M. Knudsen, Redlands, Calif.

Application March 11, 1940, Serial N0. 323,331

6 Claims.

This invention relates to improvement in centrifugal separators.

The general object of this invention is to provide an improved centrifugal separator particularly adapted for use in separating mineral from gravel or ore.

Another object of the invention is to provide a centrifugal separator that is resistant to wear and has high efliciency.

A further object of the invention is to provide a separator that is easily, quickly and completely cleaned.

An additional object of my invention is to provide a centrifugal separator bowl which is made of non-magnetizing material.

Another object of the invention is to provide a rubber riiiie member for a centrifugal separator.

A still further object is to provide a novel liner for a centrifugal separator which is easily cleaned and easily removed.

Other objects and the advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a central vertical section through my improved centrifugal separator;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of my improved separator; and

Fig. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary section taken on line 3-3, Fig. 2.

Referring to the drawing by reference, characters I have indicated my improved separator generally at I0. As shown the separator M includes a hemispherical bowl 32 preferably made of aluminum or other non-magnetizing material. The bowl I2 includes an annular rim l3 and'a hub it. A bore i5 extends through the hub it. The axes of this bore l5 and the hub it may be slightly ofiset from the axis of the bowl in order to produce a wabble action when the bowl is rotated.

A rubber bowl shaped rifiie member i6 is loosely positioned within. the bowl. i2 and includes an upper rim i! which extends outwardly and overlies the bowl rim id. The rifiie rim also extends inwardly as at !8. A plurality of at its lowest point. The member i6 is clamped between the inner surface of the bowl [2 and a metal plate 23 by a plurality of bolts 24. The.

riflle memberis attached only at the bottom, the side thereof and the edge being free to shift slightly in the bowl.

The bolts 24 also secure the hub I4 25 secured to a hollow output shaft 26 of a gear box 2?. The upper end of the shaft 28 is positioned in the bore IS. The aperture 22 is in alignment with the bore of the hollow shaft 26. A flange 28 secured to the gear box 21 is secured to a suitable support 29 by bolts 30. A suitable stopper or plug 26' is preferably positioned within the upper end of the hollow shaft 26 and 15 within the bowl l2.

An input shaft 3! of the gear box 21 extends at right angles to the shaft .216 and has a drive pulley 32 secured thereto.

A circular launder 33 is coaxially positioned about .the rim l3 of thebowl E2. The launder 33 includes an outer cylindrical rim 36 an inner cylindrical rim 35 a'flat inclined bottom 36 thus forming an asymmetrical annular chamber. A circular discharge chute 31 is provided adjacent the lower portion of the bottom 36. Therims, bottom and chute are suitably secured as by welding to form a unit.

The launder 33 is shown as supported by a plurality of angle iron legs 38 suitably secured to the outer rim 36 as by welding. The legs 38 extend downwardly and terminate at bearing plates 39 which are secured to the support 29 by bolts 40.

85 An overflow guard 8! is provided and comprises a cylindrical portion 42 and an annular portion 43 suitably secured thereto as by welding.

The guard M is held suspended in position in the launder 33 by a plurality of plates the ends of which engage the upper edge of the por tion 33 and which are shown as adjustably secured to the disk'portion d3 by bolts 65 and washers t8. Elongated slots 6? are provided in the plates M to permit adjustment.

A deflecting baflle blade 58 is secured to each of the plates 45 and extends downwardly parallel to the sides of the bowl l2. It will be seen that the overflow guard and bafiie blade assembly form a removable unit normally engaging the launder.

In operation-a suitable quantity of ore is introduced into the rifile member 56 preferably in a finely divided state and when desired mixed with sufficient water to form a pulp. The bowl as It and the rifile member it are then rotated by to a flange.

a suitable prime mover (not shown) through the pulley 32 and the gear box 21.

Free metallic particles, such as gold, are carried by centrifugal action into the spaces between the ribs l9 and the waste material passes upwardly and is discharged into the launder 36 whence it is discharged through the chute 31. The separating action is aided by the agitation resulting from the wabbling action of the bowl I 2 and by the kneading action of the soft flexible rubber ribs of the rifiie member. The baffle blades 44 prevent any scouring action which might otherwise remove the separated metal from between the ribs of the riille member. The bowl may be cleaned by removing the plug 26' and flushing with water. 7

By making the bowl of-non-magnetizing material I secure an improved result, since with an iron or steel bowl a magnetic field appears to be set up by the rotation of the separator and this fleld appears to magnetize 'the magnetic iron (or magnetite) which frequently occurs in placer sands, thus causing the iron containing particles to adhere and pack in an iron or steel bowl.

By providing the wabbling action of the bowl I secure a better result, due apparently, to the varying pressure from the centrifugal action of the material on the flexible rubber rifliing. This action appears to provide a sort of kneading movement so that a better recovery is made.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that I have invented a novel centrifugal separator which is highly efficient for its intended purpose.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In a centrifugal separator, a base, a vertical shaft rotatably mounted on said base, means to rotate said shaft, a bowl member mounted on said shaft for a wabbling rotation, a flexible resilient riiiie member positioned within and conforming to said bowl member and centrally secured thereto, said riiiie member including a plurality of inner annular flexible ribs, the lower surface of said ribs being substantially horizontal and the upper surface thereof inclined, an annular trough-like launder surrounding the periphery of said bowl, and an over-flow guard ring engaging the top of said launder.

2. In a centrifugal separator, a base, a vertical shaft rotatably mounted on said base, means to rotate said shaft, a substantially hemispherical bowl member mounted on the upper end of said shaft with the axis of said shaft out of alignment with the axis of said bowl to provide a wabbling rotation of the bowl, a flexible resilient riflie member positioned within and conforming to said bowl member and centrally secured thereto, said rifile member including a plurality of inner annular flexible ribs, the lower surface of said ribs being substantially horizontal and the upper surface thereof inclined, an annular trough-like launder surrounding the periphery of said bowl, said launder including an inclined bottom and a chute adjacent the lowest point of said bottom, an over-flow guard ring engaging 3. In a centrifugal separator, a base, a vertical hollow shaft rotatably mounted on said base, means to rotate said shaft, a removable plug in the lower end of said hollow shaft, a substantially hemi-spherical bowl member mounted on the upper end of said hollow shaft with the axis of said shaft slightly eccentric to the axis of said bowl, 9. flexible, resilient, rifile member positioned within and conforming to said bowl member and centrally secured thereto, said hollow shaft communicating. with the interior of said rifile member, said rifile member including a plurality of inner annular flexible ribs, the lower surface of said ribs being substantially horizontal and the upper surface thereof inclined, an annular trough-like launder surrounding the periphery of said bowl, said launder including an inclined bottom and a chute adjacent the lowest point of said bottom, an over-flow guard ring engaging the top of said launder, and a plurality of radial baffle plates adjustably secured to said ring, said bafile plates conforming to the shape of the rifile member and spaced therefrom.

4. In a centrifugal separator, a base, a vertical shaft mounted to rotate on the base, a one piece bowl made of nonmagnetizable material, means to eccentrically mount the bowl on the vertical shaft, and a flexible rubber riffie lining member within said bowl, said member having the upper portion thereof free from attachment to the bowl, said member including a plurality of inner, annular, flexible ribs, said ribs having horizontal bottoms and having downwardly and inwardly inclined upper surfaces.

5. In a centrifugal separator, a hollow shaft, a substantially hemispherical bowl member mounted on and communicating with said hollow shaft, a riilie member within said bowl member and conforming thereto, said riflle member including a plurality of flexible inner annular ribs, and means adjacent to the axis of the bowl for securing the rifile member to the bowl, the ritlie member being elsewhere free from attachment to the bowl.

6. In a centrifugal separator, a base, a vertical shaft rotatably mounted on said base. means to rotate said shaft, a substantially hemi-spherical rubber bowl member mounted on said shaft, a flexible resilientriflle-member positioned within and conforming to said bowl member and centrally secured thereto, said riffle member extending loosely over the interior of said bowl member, said riflle member including a plurality of inner annular flexible ribs, the lower surface of said ribs being substantially horizontal and the upper surface thereof inclined, an annular trough-like launder surrounding the periphery of said bowl, an overflow guard ring engaging the top of said launder and planar radial baffles removably secured to said ring and extending into the bowl.

GEORGE M. KNUDSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2527695 *Nov 15, 1949Oct 31, 1950Bennett John EDevice for comminuting fruits and vegetables
US2585753 *Nov 30, 1948Feb 12, 1952Drury Herbert RCentrifugal separator
US2847590 *Jun 1, 1955Aug 12, 1958Bendix Aviat CorpElectrical ignition generator
US3012710 *Oct 27, 1958Dec 12, 1961Westfalia Separator AgCentrifugal separator having lining of elastomer material
US3096282 *Dec 30, 1957Jul 2, 1963Sharples CorpImprovement in centrifuges
US3096283 *Jun 24, 1959Jul 2, 1963Becton Dickinson CoContainer for blood and machine for separating precipitates from liquid blood constituents
US3135684 *Dec 30, 1959Jun 2, 1964Holderbank CementSeparating pulverous or granular material from a carrier medium
US4361480 *Jul 29, 1981Nov 30, 1982Corbus Henry FSeparator unit for gold mining assembly
US4776833 *Oct 23, 1986Oct 11, 1988Knelson Benjamin VCentrifugal separator
US4983156 *Jul 3, 1989Jan 8, 1991Benjamin KnelsonCentrifugal separator
US5222933 *Mar 20, 1992Jun 29, 1993Benjamin V. KnelsonCentrifual discharge of concentrate
US5338284 *Jul 30, 1992Aug 16, 1994Benjamin KnelsonCentrifugal separator with substantially continuous discharge of fines
US5372571 *Jun 22, 1993Dec 13, 1994Benjamin V. KnelsonCentrifugal separator with water jacket and bottom discharge
US5421806 *Sep 6, 1994Jun 6, 1995Benjamin V. KnelsonMethod for sparating materials of different specific gravities using a centrifuge having a water jacket and base discharge ducts
US6872360 *Oct 14, 1999Mar 29, 2005Fondation Jean Dausset-CephCentrifuging device for laboratory analyzer
US6962560 *Jul 31, 2003Nov 8, 2005Knelson Patents Inc.Continuous centrifugal separation of slurry using balls contained in a recess of a bowl
US6986732 *Nov 14, 2003Jan 17, 2006Knelson Patent Inc.Centrifugal separation bowl with material accelerator
US6997859 *Oct 29, 2003Feb 14, 2006Knelson Patents Inc.Centrifugal separator with fluid injection openings formed in a separate strip insert
US7144360 *Apr 12, 2005Dec 5, 2006Knelson Patents Inc.Centrifugal separator with a separate strip insert mounted in the bowl
US7503888 *Mar 27, 2008Mar 17, 2009Knelson Patents Inc.Centrifugal separator of heavier particulate materials from light particulate materials in a slurry using a stepped lead-in surface
US8808155 *Jul 13, 2010Aug 19, 2014Flsmidth Inc.Centrifuge bowl with liner material molded on a frame
US20110028296 *Jul 13, 2010Feb 3, 2011Edwin John William ZonneveldBowl structure for a centrifugal separator
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/45, 494/81, 494/64, 494/47, 494/43
International ClassificationB04B7/00, B04B7/08
Cooperative ClassificationB04B7/08
European ClassificationB04B7/08