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Publication numberUS2274162 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1942
Filing dateDec 6, 1940
Priority dateDec 6, 1940
Publication numberUS 2274162 A, US 2274162A, US-A-2274162, US2274162 A, US2274162A
InventorsPreble Andrew Y
Original AssigneePreble Andrew Y
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for precooling freight cars
US 2274162 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. '24, 1942. A. Y.v PREBLE METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PREGOOLING FREIGHT CARS Filed Dec e, 1940 "2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I UVVEAYITOR A TTORNEYS 7 Feb. 24, 1942 A. PREBLE METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRECQOLING FREIGHT CARS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec.

INVENTOR:

W 00g ATTORNEYS to employ gates built of lattice *gates areheld against the inner ends of the side of the squeeze andbrgced'in V Patented eb. 1

* UNITED...STATES" PATENT OFFICE v i g. if Ye', 274,162 in f .IMETHODAAND APPARATUS FOR 1 J 'rnncoomuo FREIGHT oARs Asset Y. metre, El oatm al, Application-December a, 1940, Serial No. 368,827 a scream -2 (Cl."62-- -24) This invention relates to a method and apparatus' for precooling vehicles carrying freight, such as freight cars. It is the usual practice to provide an ice bunker car, and to start the V bunkers full of ice. In very hot weather in; trips across the continent, it is necessary to re-ice the bunkers, and this greatly'increases therefrigerating costs. e

] One of thezobjects of the present invention is to provide a simple method and simple appara tus for facilitating a precooling of the car, that is to say, precooling a freight space to such an extentthat the car can start-on its trip without throwing the burden on the bunkers, ofhaving to refrigerate. any portions of the freight'space down from a high" temperature after the car has departed, the general purposebeingto. avoid the necessity for re-icing-on the trip. i This improvement avoids the necessity for usingany refrigerating machinery inside of the car;v but provides simple means by circulation fromgthe exterior to reduce the. temperature of the freight space to a desired temperature. v I Practically all the freight cars have bunkers in their ends, and a door on each side of the car at about its middle. The cargo isstored on each sideof the fsqueeze or space between the doorways and between the two divisions of the cargo, one located toward the forward end 7 of the car, and the other located toward the rear end. In order to prevent the load from shifting in the freight space, it is thepresent practice work, and these cargo at each this position'hy strutsset in position etween the gates.

in each end of the freight car. on its .trip .,with the One of the objectsv of this inventionis to pro-f Q vide a simple method for utilizing the squeeze space and the gates to facilitate the circulation of a cooling fluid such as air, through the freight space and through or betweenthe crates of prod uce that constitutethe cargo.

A further objectof the invention provide a simple method for developing circulating ducts in theLsqueeze space between the provisions or provide simple cargo in a freightf'car, and to apparatus-for effecting this.

Another. objector my invention provide a e simple method and apparatus for eifecting the precoolingwithou-trequiring theicein the bunk .ers to'jassist inthe precooling operation.

A further'object of the invention is to provide I a simple method and apparatus in which the ice 55 in the bunkers can beutilized to assist in the precooling operation.

Further objects of ftheinvention 'will appear Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through a freightcar andof a diagrammatic' nature, illustratingthe method and apparatus as employed where the cooling of the freight space is effe ted independently of the ice bunkers.

Fig. 2 is also a-sectional view similar to Fig. 1, but upon an enlargedscale and showing only the middle portion'of the. car adjacent the doorways. This'view particularly illustrates the meansandapparatus employed for guidingthe cooling fluid or air in precooling the cargo space.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section taken about'on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2; and further illustrating the method and apparatus and the manner in which it is connected up to the cooling plant at'the side of the track. In this view a portion of the end of the car is shown in elevation. a

Fig; 4 is. a perspective illustrating one of the gates employed at the squeeze, for bracing the cargo Within the car, and illustrating how I adaptthese gates to my purpose. a g

' Fig. ,5 is a vertical section through a freight car similarto Fig. '1, and illustrating one of the modifications of my method in which I utilize the of the freightspace." V

I i'g. ]6 is a'vertical secfon similar to Fig. 3, taken about on theline 5-6 'of'Fig. 5. h jInFlgs; 1 to} I illustrate my method and apparatus, in which the operation is such that the cargo'space is cooled independently of the bunkers. Referring'to these figures, I indicates the car body having'ice bunkers 2 and3 in its ends,

and having a. grid -for'm floor 4 composed of lon gitudinal'stringers '5 laid on the car floor and supporting transverselslats 6 on which the freight or cargo such as crates '1 are placed. These crates. are supposed'to hold produce, and the crates are. packed in rows and tiers on each side of the doorway 8 of the car, there being a tightly packed division of these crates on each side of the doorway. In the squeeze or space I opposite the doorways and between the two divisions of the load, it is customary to provide gates III which are'in the form of grills or grating such as illustrated in Fig. 4, and composed of horizontal slats and vertical slats. put in place against the load, and short struts H are put in place between the gates and nailed in position. These struts II are put in place in an inclined position as indicated by the dotted lines, and are long enough so that when they are brought down to a horizontal position they will exert a squeeze or compression on the gates. The bunkers 2 and 3 are provided with the usual upper circulation openings or outlets l2 and similar bottom outlets or openings l3. These openings are preferably provided with shutters such as the shutters or covers l4 indicated on the upper outlets l2.

In accordance with my invention, I provide each of the gates III with a cover or sheet I5 of material such as cardboard, that is capable of cutting off flow of a fluid such as cold air; If desired, this cover l5 may be applied in the form of strips slid into position between the horizontal bars of each gate, but as illustrated in Fig. 4, I have applied asheet l5 to cover the entire area of the gate. When the areas of the gates have been covered in this way, I also provide a substantially horizontal dividing wall II which may be supported if desired, on the upper edges of the gates. This dividing wall is preferably at about the level of the upper rows or tiers of the cargo. With the interior of the car'in this condition, the car is run into position opposite the precooling apparatus is, which apparatus ineludes two flexible trunks l9 and 20, the ends of which are attached to a plug or false door 2| that is inserted in the doorway. The precooling apparatus l8 includes a blower or fan'22, and reirigeration coils indicated in dotted lines at 23;

As illustrated in Fig. 3, the suction side of -the blower 2S communicateswith the trunk and the delivery side to the trunk l9. With this arrangement, the air that passes over the cooling coils-at 23 will be forced back through the delivery duct 24 so as to pass through the doorway of the car above the horizontal inserted division wall II. This air current passing inwardly in this way will pass laterally and toward the ends of the car, passing along over the cargo as indicated by the arrows in Fig. 1. This cold air is delivered in suflicient volume to develop a slight pressure to insure that an effective air current will'be developed flowing toward each'end of the car, which will be suflicient to reach-the crates disposed adjacent the ends of the car. As a matter of fact, however, the ends of the car need less precooling than the middle portion, and for this reason it is sometimes advisable 'to provide means for inducing an increased downward flow of the longitudinal air currents through the lower portions of the gates. For this purpose I may omit the cardboard covering near the lower end of each gate, or I may provide openings 25 through the cover sheet l5 'as indicated by the dottedlinesin Fig. 4. The principal efiect of these openings is to develop secondary cooling currents, preventing channeling of the current by the shortest route to itsoutlet. In this way, the distribution through the cargo can be controlled, and dead air pockets avoided.

While the blower '22 isin operation, of course it develops a reduced pressure in the space '26 below the horizontal dividing wall I1, and this of course develops currents of cold air flowing These gates are through the crates and in the longitudinal ehannels 21 between the longitudinal stringers 5 of the false bottom of the car.

It will be'obvious that if desired, the cooling apparatus can be arranged to circulate the air in the opposite direction from that illustrated. However, I prefer to circulate the air as indicated.

In Figs. 5 and 6 I illustrate a method and apparatus in which the direction of circulation is the reverse ofthat illustrated in Fig. 3. In this case I provide covered side gates 28 and 29 extending across the interior of the car at its middle point, and I provide a horizontal division wall 30 that cooperate with these sides 28 and 29 to form a transverse duct 3| to which the delivery trunk 32 of the cooling apparatus 33 may be attached, the suction trunk 34 being connected up in the upper portion of the doorway opening so as to develop a relatively low pressure in the space 35 from which the circulated air i withdrawn as indicated by the arrows, and delivered through the breeching 36 to the fan 31 which circulates the air back through the cooling coils indicated by the dotted lines at 38. In accordance with this method, the air current that is driven transversely across the car in the space 3| below the division wall 30, flows under the lower edges of the covered gates 28 and 29, so that it passes toward the ends of the car through the channel spaces that are formed between the longitudinal stringers 39 of the floor grating. These air currents that flow iongitudinally'to'the ends of the car are driven by the force of the fan through the lower inlet openings 4|] into the interior of the bunkers 4|, so some of the air circulates up or around ice 42, and thence out again into the cargo space through the upper openings 43. The covers 44 for these outlets 43 are preferably held in an inclined position so that as the air current passes out of the bunkers, it is deflected downwardly into the cargo, but eventually is drawn upwardly through the cargo by reason of the fact that the suction of the fan is creating a reduced pressure in the spaces 45 between the upper ends of the bunkers and the reduced pres sure zone 35 in the middle of the car. This method is particularly advantageous to be used where there is an abundance of ice 42, and where the cooling apparatus is not operating at its highest efliciency.

Many other embodiments of the invention may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is:

l. A method of precooling a freight car hay.- ing ice bunkers at its ends, a grating false bottom, a doorway on the side, and with a latticefo;rn gate locatedtoward each side of the doorway for retaining the portion of the load between that gate and the corresponding ice bunker, which consists in providing a substantially fluid-tight covering for the lattioegates; placing a substantially horizontal dividing wall located at about the upper edge of the gates, ex-

tending transversely within the car body opposite the doorway; and circulating a cooling fluid into the'car in the space on one side of the said horizontal division wall, and withdrawing the cooling fluid from the space on the other side of the horizontal division wall.

2. A method of precooling a freight car having ice bunkers at its ends, a grating false bottom, a doorway on the side, and with a lattice form gate located toward each side of the doorway for retaining the portion of the load bea substantially horizontal dividing wall located at about the upper edge of the gates extending transversely within the car body opposite the doorway; circulating a cooling fluid into the car from the exterior and into the space on one side of the said horizontal division wall, withdrawing from the car the cooling fluid in the space on the other side of the horizontal division wall, and forming holes at any desired level through the said coverings to develop a secondary path for the cooling fluid and prevent formation of any dead air pockets. 4

3. A method of precooling av freight car having ice bunkers at its ends, a grating false bottom, a doorway on the side, and with a latticeform gate located toward each side of the doorway for retaining the portion of the load between that gate and the corresponding ice bunk- 'er, which consists in providing a substantially fluid-tight covering for the lattice gates; placing a substantially horizontal dividing wall located at about the upper edge of the gates extending transversely within the car body opposite the doorway; and circulating a cooling fluid from the doorway inwardly into the space above the horizontal dividing wall and so that the circulating fluid passes outwardly through the doorway from the space below the said horizontal di- I vision wall;

4. In apparatus for precooling a, freight car having a side door at an intermediate point of its-length, with a cargo space on each side of the door, the combination of a grating false bot tom for the car with means forsupporting the same so as to permit flow of air currents in a general longitudinal direction under the grating,

a transverse gate inside the car and adjacent each side of the doorway, each gate having a covering for limiting flow of air past the same downwardly adjacent its point of escape from the ice bunkers, and thereby directing the cooling current down into the freight space adjacent the bunkers, and withdrawing the cooling fluid through the upper portion of the doorway.

6. A method of precooling a freight car hava freight space with side doors leading into the same, and having ice bunkers at its ends with inner walls dividing off the bunker space from the freight space, and'with elevated openings on their inner walls leading from the upper ends of the ice bunkers into the freight space, which consists in providing a, transverse duct at the doorway, having a substantially horizontal dividing wall and side walls extending downwardly therefrom to a point adjacent the false bottom, circulating cooled air into the duct throughthe doorwayso that the cooled air passes laterally from said duct under the false bottom, thence into the ice' bunkers and upwardly through the ice therein, deflecting downwardly the current of ice-cooled air passing outwardly through the said and longitudinally of the 'car, means including braces between the gates for holding them pressed laterally against the cargo in the freight spaces, a substantially horizontal cover extendair through the'doorway at the space above the said horizontal wall of the duct.

7. A method of precooling a freight car having! ice bunkers at its ends, with inner walls at its ends dividing off the bunker space, a side door, and having openings on the inner walls of the bunkers leading from the upper ends of the ice bunkers into the freight space, which consists in circulating precooled air into the car along the car floor and into the lower ends of the ice bunkers, thence upwardly through the ice, and in an ice-cooled current passing through the said upper openings into the freight space, deflecting the said ice-cooled air current downwardly at said openings, and withdrawing the air thereafter through the upper portion of thedoorway.

8. A method of precooling a freight car having ice bunkers at its ends, a grating false bottom, a doorway on the side, and with a latticeform gate located toward each side of the doorway for retaining the portion of theload between that gate and the corresponding ice ing transversely of the car-from the doorway v and at about the level of the upper edges of the gates cooperating with the gates to form a. duct extending transversely to the car opposite the doorway, and means for circulating a precooling fluid through the said duct, through the cargo space and the space above the said cover, and through the space below the grating.

5. A method of'precooling a freight car having a false bottom, ice bunkers at its ends, and

bunker, which consists in providing a substantially fluid tight covering for the lattice gates;

, placing a substantially horizontal dividing wall located at about the upper edge of the gates extending transversely within the car body opposite the doorway; and circulating a cooling fluid aside doorway, which consists in circulating cooling fluid inwardly through the doorway at a low level and thence laterally from the doorway so that the cooling fluid passes longitudinally of the car and upwardly through the ice bunkers from below, permitting the, current of circulating fluid to escape from the ice bunkers into the freight space, obstructing the path of flow of the current so as to deflect the aid current in through j the doorway into the space above the horizontal dividing wall and thence laterally so as to flow longitudinally of the freight space within the car,.and thence.outwardly through the doorway on the other side of the said horizontal dividing wall, and providing openings in I the covering of the lattice gates disposed near jacent to the sides of the fluid-tight coveringthe floor of th car so as to prevent channeling of the circulating fluid and preventing the formation of a dead pocket in the freight space adtoward the ends of the car.

' Y ANDREW Y. PREBLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439487 *Mar 16, 1945Apr 13, 1948Clarence J LoftusMethod of precooling the lading of refrigerator cars comprising the reversal of air flow
US2538382 *Mar 12, 1948Jan 16, 1951Clarence J LoftusPrecooling combination for precooling a through-lading-load in the usual side door refrigerator car
US4143588 *Aug 2, 1977Mar 13, 1979Exler Petrus A TContainer comprising an improved floor structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/95, 62/237, 62/424, 62/421, 62/413, 454/91, 62/406
International ClassificationB61D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D27/0081
European ClassificationB61D27/00D2