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Publication numberUS2274723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1942
Filing dateJan 12, 1940
Priority dateJan 12, 1940
Publication numberUS 2274723 A, US 2274723A, US-A-2274723, US2274723 A, US2274723A
InventorsMorin Louis H
Original AssigneeDavis Marinsky, Morin Louis H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic lock slider
US 2274723 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1942. L H, MOR|N 2,274,723

AUTOMATIC LOCK SLIDER Filed Jan. l2, 1940 NVENTOR 0a/J Mo/P//v ATTORNEY 1 es 36 e219 Patented Mar. 3, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFlcE- 2,214,723 AUTOMATIC LOCK SLIDER n Louis H. Morin, Bronx, N. Y., assigner, by mesne assignments, of one-halt to said Louis H. Morin, and one-halfto Davis Marinsky, Bronx, N. Y.

.Application January 12, 1940, serial No. 313,412

s claims. (Cl. 24-2o5.5)

This invention relates to sliders for separable fastener stringers. More particularly the invention relates to an automatic locking slider having a wedge-like lock element normally urged into operative position by tensional means and moved into inoperative position in operating the slider through the medium of afinger piece or pull.

. be termed a hook end on the element I8, and

The novel features of the invention will be` best l understood from the following description and annexed drawing, in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed and in which the separateparts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views and in which:

Fig. 1 is a sectional plan view of a slider mad according to my invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view through the slider as seen in l.

Fig. 3 is a partial section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 shows perspective views of two slider parts prior to assemblage of the parts.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing a modication. t

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view of the slider as seen in Fig. 5; and

Fig. 7 is a View similar to Fig. 2 showing the Y lock element moved into Vraised position by the bottom-wall I2. The walls are spaced apart and joined by a connecting web I3 centrally of the this end operates in the recess I5 as will beapparent.

Centrally of the wide end portion of the wall II is another recess I9 forming a socket for re e ceiving a coil spring 20 which operates in c,on

nection with a downwardly directed extension 2| on the element 4I8 in normally supporting said element in operative position; or in other words, with the wedge I1 engaging theA surface I6, as seen in Fig. 2. A

Extending between the recesses I5, I9 is a shallow recess or key-way 22 in which the body portion of the element I8 seats to retain the element against shifting movement. This recess has an inclined surface 23 operating upon a rounded or cam surface 24 on the element I8 to guide the element in an upward direction to lift the wedge end .I'I out of the channel of the slider, or in otherwords, out of engagement with the links of the Stringer.

At 251s shown a cap or housing, also preferably formed by die casting. This housing forms a cover or guard for the element I8 and also provides a pivotal mounting for the pivot endV 26' Y of a pull or finger piece 21. The housing 25. is in widel end of the slider, as in conventional slider structures. Each of the walls II and I2 have at their side edgesinturned anges as at Il. The body I8 preferably, but not necessarily, is made as a die casting from metal or metal alloys or from thermoplastic materials. The top wall I I ofthe slider is formed with a recess I5 opening through the narrow end of the wall and terminating in a beveled wall I8, note Fig.2, which forms aseat against which the wedgeshaped end I1 of a lock element I8 is adapted to seat in retaining the slider body I9 against f ,inovement in the direction of the arrow z, Fig. 2,

' on the stringers of a separable fastener. As 55 of the parts Il, 25, 21. may be composed ot onf I the form of a hollow or channeled body having large recesses 28V on opposed side walls forming loose pivot apertures for the pivot end 25 of the pull. The recesses or apertures 28 divide the s ide walls of the'hood25 into.two pair of elongated feet 29. Each foot has outwardly extend- `ing beveled side surfaces 30. The feet 29 are adapted to seat in sockets or recesses 3| formed in the top wall II and at outer sides of these' recessesrare raised ribs 32 which are adapted to engage the beveled surfaces 30 in the manner illustrated in Fig. 8 in permanently securingv the hood 26 upon the top wall II ofthe slider.. v

In producing the slider from thermoplastic materials, it willbe necessary in some instances to heat the slider body suillciently to permit the forming operation with respect to the members 32. At this time it is well to understand, how-v ever, that the use of the members 32 is not absolutely essential in the thermoplastic type of devices, as cement may be utilized toadhere the parts together. In referring to the thermoplastic color, or the parts I0, of one color and the part 21 of a contrasting color, or all the parts may be composed of contrasting colors.V f

IThe hood 25 is recessed at both ends as seen at 33 to receive and provide free movement of the element I8 as will be apparent. The undersurface of the top ofthe hood 25 may also be recessed as seen at 34 to clear an upwardly extending portion 35 on the element' I8 adjacent the shoulder portion 38. This shoulder portion is normally disposed within vthe path of the transi verse apertures 28 of the hood to be engaged by the pivot end 26 of the pull 21, so that when the pull is moved in the direction of the arrow :c in moving the slider alongr the stringers to separate the stringers,`the lock element I8 will be moved forwardlyvcausing the wedge end I1 to be raised out ofthe channel of the slider to provide free passage of the :links of the stringers through the slider. Thisv raised. position of the element I8 is shown in Fig. 7 of the drawing. However, in moving the slider in the opposite direction, that is to say, in coupling two stringers, the pivot end 28 of the pull is moved out of engagement with the shoulder 38, leaving the element I8 free to move vertically in the housing 25. The wedge end I1 ratchetsover the links in this operation..

Inthis connection it will be understood that a light spring 28 is all that is essential, as the function of this springis only to move the element I8 into the position shown in Fig. 2. Locking the slider against movement in the direction of they arrow a: on the stringers is caused by the wedging of the end I1 between a link and the beveled surface I6 of the slider whichin turn will cause the end I1 to engage the links of the fastener in the manner described in said Marinsky patent. The top wall II of the slider is also preferably provided with raised posts or bearing surfaces 31 to support the pivot end 28 of the pull in spaced relation to the outer surface of the wall II of the slider.

It will be understood that by reason of the simplicity in the construction of the several parts of the slider and the fact that all of the parts may be die cast, a very economical form of lock slider construction is provided. Furthermore,

the problem of assembling sliders of the. type and kind under consideration is materially simplified since all drilling, tapping, and other machining 'operations are dispensed with. `Still further,

sliders that are constructed in accordance with my invention, composed of metal, may be easily plated or coated toprovide the desired finish thereon.

. In Figs. 5 and 6 ofthe drawing, I have shown another adaptation of my invention which differentiates from the structure shown in Figs. l to 4 inclusive, primarily in the shape and contour of the lock element and the location of the spring supporting the lock element in operative posiside of the longitudinal center of the slider asV will readily appear in Fig. 5 oi' the drawing. The element 40 has at its inner end a'laterally offset part 43 forming a seat upon which one end of. a

spring 44 rests. The other end of the sprin seats in a hood portion 45. Y

The hood portion-45 is recessed at one end as r seen at 45 to receive the hook end 4I of the lock element when raised to inoperative position in the movement of the slider longitudinally of the stringers. In operating the slider to uncouple the stringers, the lock element is moved out of engagement with the beveled surface 42 against the tension of the spring 44 by the action of the pull, and when thus disengaged from the surface 42, it will be apparent that the hook end 4I of the lock element is free to cam over the beveled surfaces of the links 49 in ratchet fashion. Likewise, in the movement of the slider to couple the stringers, the beveled surface of the end of the lock element will bear against the links 49 suiilciently to move the lock element out of enposition. The hood 45 is recessed as seen at 54 hood' has feet 29 seating in recesses formed in the upper' surface of the slider. as with the construction shown in Figs'. l to 4-inclusive, being retained in position by inturned members in Fig. 5. These members are similar to the members It will be understood that other adaptations of the invention as herein disclosed may be made in cially true .in a structure similar to that shown4 in Figs.' .1 to 4 inclusive.

The wedge I1 has a V-shaped end Ila for engagement with the links of the fastener stringers.,

The same structure is provided in the end 4I of the element 40, as clearly seen in Fig. 6 of the drawing. A

It will also be understood' that the particular location ofthe surfaces I6, 42 is really immaterial, as these 'surfaces may be positioned at any v point along the slider but preferably arranged at or adjacent the contracted end thereof.v It may be said that the wedge parts I1, 4I constitute ex.

tensions of the surfaces I5 and 42, which extensions are movable into and out of the path of the links traveling through the channel of the slider.

It will be apparent that the hoods 25and 45 in addition to shieldingthe lock element and the pivot of the pull, is also extended sumciently to form a guard to take any stress or strain tov which the slider may be subjected in laundering ,-or otherwise. and produces what is commonly referred toas a non-crush slider.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new and `desire to secure by Letters Patent is: f

l. A lock slider comprising a channeled slider body having a pull and a lock element supported for independent movement withrespect to said slder body by a hood xedly secured thereto,- said lock element comprising an elongated mem- 1 br having downwardly extending hook rparts at opposed ends thereof, one hook part operatively extending through a recess formed in'one wall of said slider and registering with an inwardly beveled wall of said recess, -resilient means between said slider body and the other hook end of said lock element for normally supporting the rst-named ho'ok end thereof in engagement with the'beveled surface of said recess, and an upwardly extending shoulder on said lock element intermediate the hook parts thereof adapted to be engaged by said pull in moving said lock element longitudinally against the action of said resilient means.

2. A lock slider comprising a channeled slider body having a pull and a lockl element supported for independent movement with respect to said slider body by a hook ixedly secured thereto, said lock element comprising an elongated member `having downwardly extending hook parts at opposed ends'thereof, one hook part operatively extending through a recess formed in one wall of said slider and registering with an inwardly beveled wall of said recess, resilient means between said slider body and the other hook end of said lock element for normally supporting the rst-.named hook end thereof in engagement with the beveled surface of said recess, an upwardly extending shoulder on said lock element intermediate the hook parts thereof adapted to be engaged by said pull in moving said lock element -longitudinally against the action of said resilient means, and the lower surface of said lockelement adjacent the rst-named hook part thereof having a cam surface cooperating with a corresponding cam surface on said slider body for raising said hook part when the lock element is mdved longitudinally tion of the slider.

3. A slider for separable fastener stringers comby said pull in the operaprising a channeled slider body, an elongated lock element arranged directly upon the `outer surface of said body and movable longitudinally thereof, means keying said element to said body,.

body and movable longitudinally thereof,` one end of said element having a hook part operatively extending through the aperture of said ed to be engaged by the pull, in'operating thev slider in one direction, to move the lockelement longitudinally of the slideragainst the action of said spring in Withdrawal of the lock part from said channel.

6. A lock slider comprising achanneled body, the outer wall of said body having -an elongated recess, said wall having at one end an opening extending into thechannel of said body, a'lock element arranged in the elongated recess of said body and movable longitudinally thereof, one end of said element having a hook part operatively I connection with the slider, means on said element adjacent the pivot of the pull adapted to be engaged by the pull, in operating the slider in one direction, to move the lock element longitudinally of the slider against the action of said spring in withdrawal of the lock part from said channel,

and said pivot forming means comprising a hood substantially enveloping said lock element.

7. In a lock slider, a channeled slider -body having an aperture at one end opening into the Achannel of said body through one Wall thereof,

a pull, meansgon said wall ofthe slider forming a pivot for said pull, an elongated lock element for the most part disposed upon and slidably movable on the outer surface of said .wall of the slider, one end of said element having an in- Wardly extending hook part operating in the 1y pivoted to the slider, and means on the lock element engaged by the pivot of the'pull, in one directional movement of the slider by said pull, to move the lock element longitudinally of the slider against the action of said spring in the removal of the hook portion from said channel. y 4. A lock slider comprising a channeled slider body, a lock element, a hood fixedly secured-to aperture of said slider` wall and offset a distance greater than the thickness of the slider wall to project into the channel of said slider, means yieldably supporting the hook part of said elel ment in said operative position, and a shoulder said body to support said element for independent longitudinal movement with respect to said body,

said element having an offset flange portion forming a spring seat, an elongated spring supported in said body and engaging the ange of said element to normally support said element in locked position, said body having a recess opening into the channel ofthe slider at one end thereof, the corresponding end of said element having a hook part operatively extending through said recess into the channel of said body, an upwardly extending shoulder portion on the lock element adapted to be engaged by the pull, in one di-y rectional movement of the slider, to move said element against the action of said spring and in withdrawing the hook part from said channel.

5. A lock slider comprising a channeled body, the outer wall of said body having an elongated recess. said wall having at one end an opening extending-into the channel of said body, a lock element-arranged in the elongated recess of said on said element engaged by the pivot of the pull in moving saidlelement to withdraw the hook part from the channel of the slider.

8. A lock slider for separable fastener stringers comprising a channeled body, one wall of said body having an elongated recess,'a lock element seating in said recess to key the .same to said slider Wall, the outer end of therecess being said element operatively extending through said aperture into the channel of said body, means comprising interengaging beveled walls between said hook part and slider wall to limit movement of said element in one direction, and means whereby said element may be manually moved longitudinally of the slider body against the action of said spring to withdraw the hook part of said body.

LOUIS H. MORIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2443360 *Apr 14, 1944Jun 15, 1948Talon IncAutomatic lock slider for slide fasteners
US2487386 *May 1, 1945Nov 8, 1949Conmar Prod CorpAutomatic lock slider
US2502055 *Aug 5, 1944Mar 28, 1950Louis H MorinAutomatic lock slider
US2512213 *Jun 13, 1944Jun 20, 1950Louis H MorinAutomatic lock slider
US2535508 *May 5, 1945Dec 26, 1950Conmar Prod CorpAutomatic lock slider
US2542547 *Oct 11, 1946Feb 20, 1951Morin Louis HAutomatic lock slider
US2588893 *Aug 3, 1946Mar 11, 1952Talon IncAutomatic lock slider for slide fasteners
US3508304 *May 14, 1968Apr 28, 1970Scovill Manufacturing CoLocking type slide fastener
US3991447 *Jul 8, 1975Nov 16, 1976Yoshida Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaSlider for sliding clasp fastener
US4048699 *Dec 31, 1975Sep 20, 1977Yoshida Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaSlider for slide fastener
US5255418 *Nov 10, 1992Oct 26, 1993Chen Shih ChungAutomatically locking slider for concealed zipper
US7000293 *Jul 2, 2004Feb 21, 2006Yu-Pau LinConcealable zipper slider structure
US20060000066 *Jul 2, 2004Jan 5, 2006Yu-Pau LinConcealable zipper slider structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/424
International ClassificationA44B19/30, A44B19/24
Cooperative ClassificationA44B19/308
European ClassificationA44B19/30G