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Publication numberUS2274890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1942
Filing dateJan 8, 1941
Priority dateJan 8, 1941
Publication numberUS 2274890 A, US 2274890A, US-A-2274890, US2274890 A, US2274890A
InventorsAlaxendra Cunningham Charles
Original AssigneeAlaxendra Cunningham Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe heel
US 2274890 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1942. c. A. CUNNINGHAM SHOE HEEL Filed Jan. 8, 1941 ATTORNEYS Patented Mar. 3, 1942 UNITED STATES 5 Claims.

My invention relates to new and useful improvements in footgear.

An important object of my invention is to provide a shoe construction having a spring heel adapted to be depressed when the weight of the wearer is directly thereabove and adapted to spring upwardly as the weight of the wearer is shifted forwardly thereof, the resilient action of the heel being unique to impart a desired elasticity to the step of the wearer.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a shoe having a spring heel of the above-mentioned character wherein the heel is unique in its construction to comfortably accommodate the foot of the wearer and to apply the spring action of the heel in a smooth and even manner.

Still another object of my invention is the provision of a shoe having a spring heel of the above-mentioned character that is readily incorporated in a shoe of conventional construction, that is efiicient in its operation and that is inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the drawing, forming a part of this specification, and wherein like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same,

Figure 1 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of a shoe construction embodying my invention, Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view taken on the line 22 of Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the lower layer of the shoe heel,

Figure 4 is a top plan view of the upper layer of the heel,

Figure 5 is a fragmentary'top plan view of the heel portion of the shoe sole, and

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a counter constructed in accordance with the teachings of my invention.

In the accompanying drawing, wherein for the purpose of illustration, is shown a preferred embodiment of my invention, the numeral l designates a shoe in its entirety, a fragmentary portion of which shoe is shown in Figures land 2. My invention is directed primarily to the provision of a spring heel for the shoe and, therefore, only a portion of the sole ll, a portion of the vamp l2 and a portion of the counter I 3 is shown.

My heel includes a layer of leather l4 secured to the rearward end of the sole II and a similar layer l of rubber, or the like, fixedly secured in superposed relation with the layer l4. Any suitable provision may be made for securing the layer l5 to the layer It; however, I have here illustrated the rubber layer as being provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced openings l6 each having a washer ll extending transversely thereof at substantially its middle. The peripheries of the washers are firmly imbedded in the walls of the openings and each of the washers is provided with a central opening adapted to receive a nail I8, or the like. As will be readily apparent, the head of the nail will be seated against the washers a substantial distance from the bottom surface of the layer and y with the pointed shank portion thereof extending into and through the layer It.

The bottom surface of the heel is preferably. formed with a suitable tread, and I prefer that the tread be substantially as illustrated in Figure 1. The outer surface of the layer I5 is formed at substantially its center with an essentially circular protuberance l9 and with a plurality ofessentially small circular protuberances 20 disposed around the border of the heel in spaced relation therewith and with each other. Elongated recesses 2| are cut into the surface of the layer at opposite sides of the protuberance I9, which recesses extend in substantially contiguous relation to the side wall of the protuberance.

Each of the protuberances 29 that may be connected to the protuberance i9 without entering one or the other of the recesses 2! is formed with an elongated integral ridge 22. This unique configuration on the bottom surface of the rubber layer I5 will solidly support the heel and the openings It in each of the protuberances 20 together with the recesses 2! will form suction pockets adapted to prevent the wearer from slipping upon the surface being traversed.

The upper surface of the layer M is provided with a plurality of sockets 23 arranged in spaced relation around the marginal edge thereof. The lower end of a relatively weak spring M is seated in each of the sockets 23 and the upper ends thereof extend through aligning openings 25 in the sole II and project a substantial distance thereabove to support the insole 26 in. normally spaced relation with the sole. A relatively strong spring 2'5 extends through aligning openings in the sole H and layer Hi. The last-mentioned openings are located substantially centrally of the heel and directly above the large protuberance IS on the bottom surface of the layer'lfi and a suitable metallic liner 281s fitted into the passages to prevent the spring 21 from biting into or otherwise chewing the walls of the passages. As best illustrated in Figure 2, the lower end of the liner is closed and rests upon an essentially frusto-conical shaped support 29 rising centrally from the recess 30. The upper end of the spring 21 is coextensive of the upper ends of the springs 24 in a manner to seat against the under surface of the insole 26.

A counter 3! is supported by the portion of the insole extending across the heel and the counter is provided with a pad 32 of sponge rubber, or like material. The pad covers the entire heel portion of the insole and is essentially yieldable and resilient in its nature to comfortably support the heel of the wearer.

It might be well to note at this point that the rearward end portion of the insole is unattached and that it is merely supported by the extending ends of the springs 24 and 2?. Obviously, if the rearward portion of the insole is unattached and supported only by the springs, weight applied thereto will act to depress the springs; however, immediately upon removal of the weight the resilient action of the springs will again force the heel portion of the insole to the normally elevated position. Thus, when the shoe is applied to the foot of the wearer, normal walking action will cause the weight of the wearer to be alternately applied to and removed from. the heel of the shoe. As the shoe is swung forwardly and pressed on the ground, the weight of the wearer will be gradually shifted from a position rearwardly of the heel to a position forwardly thereof. As the weight passes directly over the heel, the springs will be depressed and, as the weight is shifted forwardly thereof, the resilient action of the springs will urge the insole and counter upwardly to impart a springiness to the step of the wearer. The centrally located relatively heavy spring 2'! will also press downwardly on the support 29 which, by reason of the rubber composition of the layer [5, is inherently resilient to impart an added increment of springiness thereto. The essentially soft and inherently pliant nature of the pad 32 will comfortably accommodate the heel of the wearer and will impart the essentially rapid action of the springs 24 and 27 to the heel of the wearer in a smooth and even manner.

It may thus be seen that all of the constituent parts of the spring heelv hereinabovedescribed, when. properly associated and correlated, will act to render the step of the wearer youthful and elastic and that the spring action will operate in a smooth and even manner. The essentially heavy spring 27 is located centrally to sustain the main portion of the weight and the plurality of relatively weak springs 24 spaced circumferentially therearound will act to distribute the weight evenly over the entire area of the heel.

It is to be understood that the form of my invention, herewith shown and described, is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that various changes in the size, shape and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of my invention, or scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In a shoe construction including an insole and a heel, a plurality of relatively weak springs seated in circumferentially spaced sockets Opening through the upper surface of the heel, and a relatively strong spring seated in a centrally located socket opening through the upper surface of the heel, all of said springs extending above the mentioned surface of the heel and against the said insole in a manner to hold the said insole in spaced relation with the heel.

2. In a shoe construction including an insole and a heel, a plurality of relatively weak springs seated in circumferentially spaced sockets opening through the upper surface of the heel, a relatively strong spring seated in a centrally located socket opening through the upper surface of the heel, and an essentially resilient base supporting the said last spring, all of said springs extending above the mentioned surface of the heel and against the said insole in a manner to hold the same spaced above the heel.

3. In a shoe construction including an insole and superposed upper, lower and intermediate layers, said upper layer constituting a sole and said intermediate and lower layers comprising a heel, a plurality of springs. seating withinjsockets extending through and arranged in spaced relation about the portion of the upperlayer overlying the said intermediate and lower layers, another spring extending through and located centrally of the upper and intermediate layers, the lower end of the, last spring being supported by an essentially resilient projection rising centrally from a recess in the upper surface of the bottom layer and the upper ends of all of said springs projecting substantially above the top surface. of the upper layer and against the said insole to normally hold the same spaced above the said upper layer.

4. In a shoe construction including an insole and superposed upper, lower and intermediate layers, said upper layer constituting a sole and said lower and intermediate layers constituting a heel, a plurality of springs seating in sockets opening through the upper surface of the sole, certain of said sockets being located in spaced relation about the circumference of the portion of the sole overlying the heel and certain of the sockets being located centrally thereof, the inner surface of the said lower layer being provided with an annular recessbelow the centrally located springs and having an essentially resilient support rising centrally from the recess to support the said springs, all of said springs extending above the sole and against the insole in a manner to hold the same spaced above the said upper layer.

5. In a shoe construction including an insole and superposed upper, lower and intermediate layers, said upper layer constituting a sole and said lower and intermediate layers constituting a heel, a plurality of springs seating in sockets opening through the upper surface of the sole, certain of said sockets being located in spaced relation about the circumference of the portion of the sole overlying the heel and certain of the sockets being located centrally thereof, said lower layer being provided with an annular recess below the centrally located springs and having an essentially resilient support rising centrally from the recess to support the said springs, all of said springs extending above the sole and against the insole in a manner to hold the same in slight spaced relation, a counter member supported by the insole, and an essentially yieldable pad carried by the portion of the counter overlying the said springs.

CHARLES ALAXENDRA CUNNINGHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6497057 *Nov 1, 1999Dec 24, 2002Ariat International, Inc.Heel cushion
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/37
International ClassificationA43B21/00, A43B21/12, A43B21/32
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32
European ClassificationA43B21/32